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News: JavaOne 2008: Day One (So Far)

  1. JavaOne 2008: Day One (So Far) (11 messages)

    JavaOne 2008 Day One has started, of course, and it's an interesting show, with a lot of undercurrents about JavaFX (as expected) and multimedia - and mobile applications. There's a lot more, of course, and this thread is meant for people to add comments at will... The opening keynote was ... interesting. If only it had been 2007, it would have been great - and in 2007, it was interesting, as most of this keynote was 2007's JavaFX introduction all over again. It looks great now (still) but ... I couldn't see people being interested, once they got over being dazzled with the flashy graphics. JavaFX is being reintroduced to the same people who weren't done forgetting it from last year - it's a little hard to watch this year. Let's face it, guys, the rabbit's dead. The conference is quiet compared to last year. Some of the biggest news isn't being said, or has already been posted: the SpringSource Application Platform was released last week, of course, which would have been a major release here - but it's hard to see Sun offering Spring that kind of press at JavaOne. A note from the floor: lots of interesting booths, but the logo above the BEA booth stands out: It says "Oracle | BEA" instead of just BEA... Feel free to post your thoughts in this thread about things you've seen.

    Threaded Messages (11)

  2. I understand that JavaFX should be taken with care, since it's on the razor's edge. But I've seen a fundamental difference so far: last year (and just up to a few time ago) I've seen only demos and small applets; this year Stephan Janssen demonstrated a real application (the version of Parleys.com based on JavaFX). It's worth mentioning that he said that a stand-alone client for uploading movies that they made has been made with JavaFX with no special care (same code as the applet), while with Air/Flex things would have been much harder (if even possible). Stephan has a specific talk with a comparison with the two technologies in the next days and we'll learn more.
  3. The (accelerated) multimedia capabilities of JavaFX looked interesting. However, JavaFX is supposed to be the Sun alternative for doing Rich Internet Applications, but it basically boils down to Java Applets. I've never really liked the way Applets perform in a browser, and with me many others as the alternatives to applets are way more popular. I still expect there's something to be announced in the Portal area. There's a booth with Glassfish and Liferay, and Sun might replace it's own Portal Server with this open source portal implementation. This would make Glassfish a very interesting platform, but we'll see about that the next few days...
  4. Re: JavaOne 2008: Day One (So Far)[ Go to top ]

    I've never really liked the way Applets perform in a browser, and with me many others as the alternatives to applets are way more popular.
    I think I remember reading something about the applet issue being addressed. Something might already have been done. I'll have to did for it. This might be it - https://jdk6.dev.java.net/plugin2/
  5. Applets are dead[ Go to top ]

    Applets are dead. I'm surprised that it's even a topic. If you want to do Rich Internet, you focus on a framework that delivers HTML/Ajax as output. Even Microsoft's second go at Flash with Silverlight may very well fail even though, given it's C# programming model it *could* easily be technically more compelling than Flash. But if you look at the speed at which Flex apps load with the new Flash cache (way faster than HTML/Ajax), well, who needs JavaFX? What is the compelling reason to use it for the end user. The load time of applets? Those nasty applet security alerts? Downloading tens of Megs for the Java runtime? Unless, of course, it compiles to Flash/Flex/Flash. Then it becomes a better way to write for a main stay platform. Well, the one place it may shine is on mobile. And it may gain some traction in the enterprise space where Java developers can more easily apply their skills on a Java based platform. Then again, even in the enterprise space, why not use something like GWT or one of the other Rich Internet platforms?
  6. OSGi support is also a very good news. But I am not sure that, for such a core technology, like module kernel, having both standards is that good. Having 2 module systems would make more difficult to move modules from Java kernel to an OSGi-only kernel. At the end, is OSGi going to win ? While thinking these days about OSGi-like technology, I am wondering about Java-Jini links. With OSGi support into the JDK, Java looks like gaining one feature Jini has. So, I wonder about what remains into the Jini pockets. Programming style ? Some specific services (like Javaspace) ? Other stuff ? This being said, the new applet way looks like also quite interesting. Being able to drag and drop applets outside the browser is a first step showing applet lifecycle is not linked anymore to the browsers: this gives another door to push Java on the desktop.
  7. Being able to drag and drop applets outside the browser is a first step showing applet lifecycle is not linked anymore to the browsers: this gives another door to push Java on the desktop.
    this sounds extremely interesting. I hope that Sun finally gets its act together. A focus on the consumer desktop is far more important than the server side technologies like OSGI. Java is already strong on the server side, but very weak on the client side. This needs to improved.
  8. Sorry, it should read: This needs to _be_ improved.
  9. Being able to drag and drop applets outside the browser is a first step showing applet lifecycle is not linked anymore to the browsers: this gives another door to push Java on the desktop.


    this sounds extremely interesting. I hope that Sun finally gets its act together. A focus on the consumer desktop is far more important than the server side technologies like OSGI. Java is already strong on the server side, but very weak on the client side. This needs to improved.
    D&D of applets outside the browser is showed during Robert Brewin's web cast available here.
  10. With OSGi support into the JDK, Java looks like gaining one feature Jini has. So, I wonder about what remains into the Jini pockets. Programming style ? Some specific services (like Javaspace) ? Other stuff ?
    Can you elaborate on that? Does OSGi support mobile code?
  11. With OSGi support into the JDK, Java looks like gaining one feature Jini has. So, I wonder about what remains into the Jini pockets. Programming style ? Some specific services (like Javaspace) ? Other stuff ?


    Can you elaborate on that? Does OSGi support mobile code?
    From Wikipedia entry1 : "The [OSGi] Framework implements a complete and dynamic component model, something that is missing in standalone Java/VM environments. Applications or components (coming in the form of bundles for deployment) can be remotely installed, started, stopped, updated and uninstalled without requiring a reboot; management of Java packages/classes is specified in great detail. Life cycle management is done via APIs which allow for remote downloading of management policies. The service registry allows bundles to detect the addition of new services, or the removal of services, and adapt accordingly. The original focus was on service gateways but the applicability turned out to be much wider. The OSGi specifications are now used in applications ranging from mobile phones to the open source Eclipse IDE. Other application areas include cars, industrial automation, building automation, PDAs, grid computing, entertainment (e.g. iPronto), fleet management and application servers.". From a coarse-grained point of view, Jini is about discovering, assembling, using and un-assembling services. I just see service proxys are modules that may assemblied into a module system. OSGi provides such module system. Then, it looks like Java is gathering some Jini features, or least, some basic features that may be use to do some Jini-like programming are going to appear into JDK. It sounds like Jini as a testbed for interesting features for Java. This raises some interesting questions. One is the following: why not going to move forward and to define another (Java EE ?) profile to include (more interesting stuff of) Jini into regular Java development kits ?
  12. applets[ Go to top ]

    One can build applets, they just can't be deployed by end users. (6.10 supports very limited things and it's deployment will be to small % of end users in coming years) .V