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News: Book Review: Algorithms in Java

  1. Book Review: Algorithms in Java (13 messages)

    Algorithms in Java is an excellent reference for those who want to go beyond the Java APIs to better understand the data structures and algorithms that programmers use in manipulating data. Its examples in Java make it possible to both follow the algorithm descriptions in code and to lift that code out and use it in actual implementations.
  2. I love abstractions; it's the mathematician in me. But I believe strongly that you should understand what it is you are abstracting before you do so. You have the sorting and searching algorithms as Java APIs, but unless you've actually coded them at some point in your life, in some language, you don't know how to pick the right one. You won't know which one to use, and why you're using it, unless you've studied the alternatives and coded them yourself first. I'm just not sure if that defeats the purpose of abstractions to begin with. You say these topics aren't sexy, but I find them both fascinating and essential for anyone with aspirations to become a programmer.
  3. The book is awesome, IMHO it's the best book on Algorithms focused on Java out there. However, I don't like the java style used in the book.
  4. Are we talking about a new book, or the Sedgewick book that's been out for over 10 years? If so, what's the point of this post? Besides the 2 sentences, the content of the post doesn't make much sense either. And to title the post "Book Review"? Where is the review? Peter, I know you're new here, but the editorial staff rarely allows something like this crap to slip through. Yes, there are many posts that are ridiculous, but this one beats them hands down. Ilya
  5. You've got to click on the article off the right-hand panel. I was also confused at first.
  6. It's the still-incomplete series that's new, yes. The older books - some of which are way older than ten years - are still valid, but this was based on the Algorithms in Java volumes being published NOW.
  7. It's the still-incomplete series that's new, yes. The older books - some of which are way older than ten years - are still valid, but this was based on the Algorithms in Java volumes being published NOW.
    Joe, agree that books on general topics that are very old are still very valid and sometimes actually are better than the newer books. I guess when I posted this, I didn't look at the right side, but I'm sure the same oversight was done by many. It would help to have a link to same article by you from the news post as the one from the right hand panel. Otherwise it looks like some troll post. Ilya
  8. Algorithms in Java is an excellent reference for those who want to go beyond the Java APIs to better understand the data structures and algorithms that programmers use in manipulating data. Its examples in Java make it possible to both follow the algorithm descriptions in code and to lift that code out and use it in actual implementations.
    Well, if the purpose is to go beyond Java maybe is better to take a look at Knuth's bible. Guido
  9. Algorithms in Java is an excellent reference for those who want to go beyond the Java APIs to better understand the data structures and algorithms that programmers use in manipulating data. Its examples in Java make it possible to both follow the algorithm descriptions in code and to lift that code out and use it in actual implementations.

    Well, if the purpose is to go beyond Java maybe is better to take a look at Knuth's bible.

    Guido
    Knuth and Sedgewick are complementary, IMO. Sedgewick was a student of Knuth's, so they're certainly aware of each other. :)
  10. Hi, This (those?) book(s) seems extremely useful. I looked on Amazon and I found 2 books (Part 1-4 and Part 5) that came out on 2002 and 2003 (third edition). Are they the one you reviewed ? Is these more recent edition than those ? And a last thing: it would be useful to have the ISBN in the review :-)
  11. ISBN?[ Go to top ]

    Can someone provide the ISBN for this book?
  12. The review includes the following text: "The second volume - which covers graph theory - is a little more esoteric... the graphs here are thought of as connected nodes, not pie charts and the like." In that case, the book is esoteric in many other ways. The tables are not the sort one eats off, the trees are data structures rather than large plants and a hash has nothing to do with ground beef. The notion of a graph as a set of vertices connected by edges is fundamental to computer science and underpins many well-known algorithms in computing. Is the intention to patronise the readers of the review, or were you just not that well placed to review this particular book?
  13. The review includes the following text:
    "The second volume - which covers graph theory - is a little more esoteric... the graphs here are thought of as connected nodes, not pie charts and the like."

    In that case, the book is esoteric in many other ways. The tables are not the sort one eats off, the trees are data structures rather than large plants and a hash has nothing to do with ground beef.

    The notion of a graph as a set of vertices connected by edges is fundamental to computer science and underpins many well-known algorithms in computing. Is the intention to patronise the readers of the review, or were you just not that well placed to review this particular book?
    Fair enough. But when I say I have a graph library, what I've found most people think of is a charting library. Therefore, it's worth pointing out that it's using graphs in the formal sense, not the colloquial sense.
  14. Is this book available somewhere? Any direct link?