First Release of Apache Sling

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News: First Release of Apache Sling

  1. First Release of Apache Sling (17 messages)

    Sling is intended to bring back the fun to Java developers and make the life of a web developer easier. It deals with the important task of bringing your content into the web and providing a platform to manage/update the content. Underneath the covers Sling makes use of a Java Content Repository (such as Apache Jackrabbit). Sling is built into OSGi bundles and therefore benefits from all advantages of OSGi. On the development side a scripting layer (using Apache BSF) allows to use any scripting language with Sling (of course you can use plain old Java, too). And on top of this, Sling helps in developing an application in a RESTful way. As the first web framework dedicated to JSR-170 Java Content Repositories, Sling makes it very simple to implement simple applications, while providing an enterprise-level framework for more complex applications. Apache Sling currently comes in four flavors: - A standalone application (a jar containing everything to get started with Sling) - A web application (just drop this into your favorite web container) - The full source package (interested in reading the source?) - Maven Artifacts (available through the Apache Incubator Repository) For more information, please visit the Apache Sling web site at http://incubator.apache.org/sling or go directly to the download site at http://incubator.apache.org/sling/site/downloads.cgi The Apache Sling Community -- Carsten Ziegeler cziegeler@apache.org

    Threaded Messages (17)

  2. HREF for Sling[ Go to top ]

    Your HREF for Sling is wrong, it includes the comma and the link gives a 404.
  3. Re: HREF for Sling[ Go to top ]

    HREF fixed.
  4. Given the fact that Carsten is a core developper of Apache Cocoon, can we expect Sling to become the very core of some future Apache web frameworks, such as Cocoon? (that would definitely be a good news).
  5. As a Sling committer, I don't think there are any plans to make Cocoon run on Sling. Implementing Cocoon-like pipelines, or using a minimal version of Cocoon inside Sling sounds much more probable, that might be useful for example to generate PDF documents from Sling using FOP and XSLT transforms. The extreme modularity provided by OSGi makes it possible to write something like that without having to know much about Sling internals, so contributions are very much welcome, of course...
  6. How do you plan to orchestrate the Sling components in a web application? REST-style (ie. orchestration is somewhere else)? or provide some kind of workflow system?
  7. Very exciting[ Go to top ]

    This is the most interesting thing I've seen for the Web in a long, long time. I've been noodling in my head a very similar system, but this goes beyond what I was thinking, and it more innovative and flexible. This thing is wide open in terms of flexibility. This is what happens when you take a JCR and, basically, "expose" it to the web. On the one hand, its very "back to basics". It's got nothing on the modern component frameworks in terms of developing sophisticated "web apps". It is, in fact, quite "old school". You can look at this as a minor step up from web development ca 1995, where everything as just HTML and CGI. But it is more than that. In old school apache, you had static resources and scripts. But here, you have content nodes with meta data, and scripts are used to create the content. This is very powerful. With servlets, we'd have to put filters or write servlets to handle the requests, and we'd have them mapped in a flat space, but with hierarchical names. Or we'd have "meta" servlets serving entire spaces (*.jsp, for example, or /this/that/*). Here we can look at content as a hierarchy of nodes and readily attach logic on the nodes, if we want to. We can put logic on specific nodes, we can put it on branches, we can readily handle different representations. Also, we can do this all dynamically. We can upload changes on the fly, we can upload SERVLETs on the fly, no container restart required (thanx to OSGi). Finally, this is on a full boat JCR, which should include version control (doesn't really say, but JackRabbit has some support for that, so if not now, should be close). I wouldn't use this for a internal office order entry system. Far better frameworks for that. But for more conventional "web sites", that are more content than logic, I think this is a very powerful base system that can be really flexible.
  8. Re: Very exciting[ Go to top ]

    It would almost be perfect for a site like TSS, for example. Trivial to do, really.
  9. Re: Very exciting[ Go to top ]

    It would almost be perfect for a site like TSS, for example. Trivial to do, really.
    Yeah, looks like a good match for that.
  10. Something like: <% sling.wicket_component("component_name", "/catalog/list"); %> where "component_name" is some Wicket component deploy through OSGi bundle, Sling fetch the data from the repository wrap it in a Wicket model, hand it off to the Wicket component to generate html, allow header contribution. Wouldn't this be nice?
  11. <% sling.wicket_component("component_name", "/catalog/list"); %>
    ...Wouldn't this be nice?
    It sure would, and you're welcome to discuss this over on the Sling developers list if you think you could contribute something!
  12. TSS in Sling[ Go to top ]

    It would almost be perfect for a site like TSS, for example. Trivial to do, really.
    Actually yesterday David Nuescheler and myself recreated TSS in Sling in 10 minutes, live on stage at the Jazoon conference [1] ;-) To be honest we did not *completely* recreate TSS, but starting from a set of static pages saved from the TSS site, 10 minutes are enough to start Sling from scratch (runnable jar, no installation required) and add the very small amount of Sling code required to create, edit, approve and display posts. [1] http://preview.tinyurl.com/53usl5
  13. Was the event filmed?[ Go to top ]

    It is a pity that the event was not filmed. Was it?
  14. Re: TSS in Sling[ Go to top ]

    It would almost be perfect for a site like TSS, for example. Trivial to do, really.


    Actually yesterday David Nuescheler and myself recreated TSS in Sling in 10 minutes, live on stage at the Jazoon conference [1] ;-)

    To be honest we did not *completely* recreate TSS, but starting from a set of static pages saved from the TSS site, 10 minutes are enough to start Sling from scratch (runnable jar, no installation required) and add the very small amount of Sling code required to create, edit, approve and display posts.

    [1] http://preview.tinyurl.com/53usl5
    Yeah, same thing happened at TSSJS-Vegas. It's a good presentation.
  15. Re: TSS in Sling[ Go to top ]

    I'd love to see this presentation. Or just (reasonably detailed) slide, or simply a write up of what was done and why.
  16. There is a video of David Nüscheler doing the presentation at Webtuesday in Zürich: http://log.hugoschotman.com/hugo/2008/06/webtuesday-2008-05-13-apache-sling-by-david-nuescheler.html And there are two screencasts of Sling, where the second demoes the same action of "re-writing" TSS: http://dev.day.com/microsling/content/blogs/main/firststeps1.html http://dev.day.com/microsling/content/blogs/main/firststeps2.html
  17. There is a video of David Nüscheler doing the presentation at Webtuesday in Zürich:

    http://log.hugoschotman.com/hugo/2008/06/webtuesday-2008-05-13-apache-sling-by-david-nuescheler.html

    And there are two screencasts of Sling, where the second demoes the same action of "re-writing" TSS:

    http://dev.day.com/microsling/content/blogs/main/firststeps1.html

    http://dev.day.com/microsling/content/blogs/main/firststeps2.html
    All these links can be found on Day Software developer's portal and blog, http://dev.day.com/. Generally, the "sling" category at and blog is a good source of Sling news, tutorials, and more: http://dev.day.com/microsling/content/blogs/main.html?category=sling Finally, dev.day.com *is* built on Sling! Disclaimer: I work for Day.
  18. Cool stuff[ Go to top ]

    Cool stuff really! It took maven 45 mins to download all the dependencies though.