Book: Service Oriented Architecture with Java

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News: Book: Service Oriented Architecture with Java

  1. Book: Service Oriented Architecture with Java (16 messages)

    I recently read “Service Oriented Architecture with Java” by Binildas CA, Malhar Barai, and Vicenzo Caselli. This book provides a look at some of the tools in the Java world that can be applied to support a Service Oriented Architecture. There are 6 Chapters in all: Chapter 1: The Mantra of SOA This chapter reviews basic tiered architecture, EA and the basic points of benefit of SOA including better integration, business agility, asset re-use, increase ROI Chapter 2: Web Services and SOA Practically all current SOA implementations now are built upon web services. XML over the Http protocol is covered. Representational State Transfer(REST) is covered. Main java implementations of web services are introduced including JAX-WS 2, Axis2, Spring-WS, and XFire/CXF 2.0. Chapter 3 : Web Service Implementations Code is presented for getting a web service up and running in JAX-WS2, Axis2, Spring-WS, and XFire/CXF 2.0 The coded examples are very easy to follow and can get a developer up and running quickly. Chapter 4: Data and Services – All Roads Lead to Enterprise Service Bus This chapter reviews JDO(Java Data Objects) as an alternative to JDBC along with sample code and examples. Service Data Objects(SDO) are covered as a way to abstract data within and SOA. Apache Tuscany DSO is covered with an example. Service Component Architecture(SCA) is described along with a Tuscany SCA java example Benefits of MOM and ESB are also covered. OpenESB is covered as an open source option for implementing an ESB. Chapter 5 – Traditional Integration Technology 2 Case Studies are presented showing the advantages of an SOA based architecture over that of EAI. Chapter 6 – Goals We Can Achieve with SOA Loose Coupling, Reusability, Seamless Integration, Return on Investment(ROI) All in all this is a pretty good book. It’s focus is definitely to provide information on a SOA implementation in a java oriented environment. This book covers the basics of the open source options to getting java based web services and infrastructure. I would strongly recommend this book to those trying to do open source SOA implementations in java.

    Threaded Messages (16)

  2. I fully agree[ Go to top ]

    It's true that this book is a must-have for any Java-guy who wants to get a refresh on SOA & webservices implementations. Strongly recommended as well !
  3. Re: I fully agree[ Go to top ]

    I am surprised that a book on SOA , only talks about Web Services as mechanism to build SOA components. I hope I am wrong, but it seems apparent from the chapter names. The real definition of SOA is independent of Web Services. Web Services just happenes to be one of the numerous transport -I/O mechanisms to access a SOA component. It is strange that people fall in to the popular myth traps. To me a book on SOA should talk about how to build components and make it independent, rather than preaching me to host it as a web service. Just my 0.1 cent
  4. Re: I fully agree[ Go to top ]

    True there are may ways to access your services may it be via SOAP , RMI - EJB , Hessian etc.. All you need is an interface and a framework to access your components, the thing about having SOAP as the defacto standard for accessing your services is a bit old-fashioned and is not an always practical solution.
  5. Link of the book[ Go to top ]

    Where is the link of the book or the web site where we can find more information ?
  6. Link of the book[ Go to top ]

    http://www.amazon.com/Service-Oriented-Architecture-Malhar-Barai/dp/1847193218/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1219408269&sr=8-1
  7. Link of the book[ Go to top ]

    http://www.packtpub.com/service-oriented-architecture-for-java-applications/book
  8. I ordered the book because of the promising table-of-contents. The title could have been better chosen, something like Building Webservices with Java. A major disadvantage is the choice of not doing the contract-first (XSD) approach in Spring-WS. Overall it offers a nice bunch of examples which can be used by newbies, for the hotter stuff you have to look for other resource.
  9. We count the years....[ Go to top ]

    2008 and still a book on SOA that is mainly focused on SOAP, one of the worst technology stacks that one could come across during the last 10 years or so. One that really fulfils the good old mantra "Hard to do the easy stuff and quite impossible to do the hard stuff". In particular, with SOAP (and in particular with SOAP over HTTP) you can never achieve "loose coupling" in a practical sense. The only thing you achieve is "late binding" which is something very different.
  10. SOAP is OK[ Go to top ]

    2008 and still a book on SOA that is mainly focused on SOAP, one of the worst technology stacks that one could come across during the last 10 years or so.

    One that really fulfils the good old mantra "Hard to do the easy stuff and quite impossible to do the hard stuff".

    In particular, with SOAP (and in particular with SOAP over HTTP) you can never achieve "loose coupling" in a practical sense. The only thing you achieve is "late binding" which is something very different.
    It's nice to throw some vague SOAP criticism into air and complain about how non-perfect it is. The fact is there is no real alternative to it or else you would have named it (and at the same exposed the alternative to actual criticism) In real life 99% of people implementing SOA will do it using SOAP and web services. I would much rather read a book that tells me what actually goes on in the world, than a book that waves hands about cute, pink, abstract SOA dreams "that are not bound to the old, evil SOAP".
  11. SOAP is unacceptable[ Go to top ]

    SOAP is three things: 1) an effort to backfill the limitations of HTTP by layering aspect protocols on top of it; this is axiomatically impossible. 2) a single-proxy communication model -- every message must go through "the" SOAP server. From a mechanical standpoint, this is too foolish to deserve specific refutation. Its practical consequence is that the SOAP server has to "open the envelope" of every message, which is semantically unacceptable. The plentiful evidence begins with the need to invent yet more aspect protocols to get around the inherent misfactoring of the security model that results. 3) a body of implementation practice focussed on using schema validation to determine message integrity at the wrong layer. This prevents compatible versioning, which in turn prevents incremental adoption and maintenance. The alternative is HTTP, which is a protocol for manipulating resources, which represent information. It does what it does; and it doesn't do -- and cannot be plastered over to do -- what it doesn't.
  12. Re: SOAP is OK[ Go to top ]

    Er...no. There are lot of large-scale implementations that simply use messaging (choose your transport - MQ, Tibco...) and plain XML and some kind of a mediation layer (transformation, routing) to reach out to diverse back ends and still keep things reasonably loosely coupled without having to stuff everything into a SOAP message. Walk into any bank and you'll see what I mean.
  13. Re: SOAP is OK[ Go to top ]

    Messages servers like MQ or Tibco have some advantages over soap based solutions. Their messages are much lighter than soap wrapped messages. But you must know the format of the message to parse it and then bind it to your domain object. I choose SOAP for low-medium vol operations and messaging for high vol ones. But I guess if your system can truly scale out, SOAP perhaps is better than messaging due to its portability
  14. Re: SOAP is OK[ Go to top ]

    In real life 99% of people implementing SOA will do it using SOAP and web services. I would much rather read a book that tells me what actually goes on in the world, than a book that waves hands about cute, pink, abstract SOA dreams "that are not bound to the old, evil SOAP".
    No, most people hopefully got round to plain XML if they want loose coupling - possibly together with a proper messaging solution that takes care of routing in a way that is bizarrely complex when using SOAP. And don't get me started about service versioning and caller-transparent interface extensions. Or they simply use one of the strongly typed, note-quite-so-loosely coupled solutions available in the market place, like Corba or EJB that are much more robust, perform better and are infinitely more convenient to use compared with SOAP.
  15. Very good book[ Go to top ]

    First of all, this book is not 800 or more pages of conceptual blah blah. This book is mind-sized to less than 200 pages of practical no-nonsense knowledge on SOA; 169 pages to be exact. The authors clearly have a thorough understanding of SOA from a business point-of-view as well as of the application level implementation aspects. They succeeded in bringing SOA to earth, presenting no more and no less of SOA than it is. In their own words: We convert the business processes to "services" and expose it to be "oriented" with its business goals. The software design "architecture" that conforms to this is SOA. Not only does this book offer practical insights in the architectural and business aspects of SOA, why XML and web services is a good idea at the implementation level, the limitations of RESTful services, why an ESB, aspects of data handling, and tight coupling versus loose coupling. The authors also demonstrate how all of this can me implemented with today's available tools and frameworks in a Java environment. You really can try out at home how these concepts work. For this purpose the Java code snippets used in the book are downloadable from the publishers website. There is a easy case study included which compares a traditional EAI solution with an SOA-based solution of a simplified business problem. Really a brilliant and yet easy to understand illustration. If you are a programmer (not necessarily a Java programmer) and you want your SOA-programming understanding to be state-of-the-art, this book is one that should be on your shortlist for reading shortly . But also if you are a designer or an architect with little or no Java knowledge, the book is still very valuable in understanding when and how to apply an SOA-approach; you just skip the Java details. As I said, it is not an overloaded book as many others are, but just a mind-sized set of interesting need-to-know knowledge from a holistic point-of-view, business as well as implementation, written in a style which offered me a few hours of delightful reading. -Jack http://soa-eda.blogspot.com
  16. Thank you all for those kind comments. Appreciate the time taken out for studying the book. We will try incorporate your comments in the next book. Regards Malhar Barai - Co author
  17. Copy review in next edition[ Go to top ]

    @Malhar Barai, You are free to copy my review in the next edition of your book. -Jack
    Thank you all for those kind comments. Appreciate the time taken out for studying the book.

    We will try incorporate your comments in the next book.

    Regards
    Malhar Barai - Co author