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News: JavaRebel 1.2 released, now with full Spring support

  1. The latest stable release of the JavaRebel code reloading agent includes a plugin for Spring that reloads Spring configuration on-the-fly boosting development productivity even more. See the screencast and download JavaRebel and the plugin. For this stable JavaRebel release we have focused on two main themes: stability and extensibility. This includes the following changes from 1.1:
    • Reworked core. Thanks to the numerous enhancements to the core JavaRebel can now handle any esoteric code or container there is.
    • Reworked SDK. Thanks to the new API and configuration you can now make any part of your application or library code reloadable, no matter where or how is it located. SDK is available as open-source.
    • JavaRebel plugins. It is now easy to support custom classloaders, containers and frameworks by registering a simple Plugin. Open-source example plugin, plugin development howto and a discussion mailing list are available at ZeroTurnaround Community.
    • Equinox OSGi container, IBM WebSphere and Atlassian Confluence plugins are now supported
    See the full list of changes or just download JavaRebel now. In addition to that we have released a JavaRebel plugin for Spring that allows reloading/reinjecting Spring dependencies on-the-fly without reloading the bean factory or application context. We have prepared a screencast that demonstrates the Spring plugin features. See the plugin installation manual for more details or just download it. Now that the infrastructure is in place we plan to provide more plugins for the most popular frameworks that enable seamless zero turnaround even when updating configuration or other resources. You are welcome to join our community and contribute a plugin for your favorite framework or platform.

    Threaded Messages (9)

  2. FYI[ Go to top ]

    It never worked for me until now because I can specify packages that should be reloadable, nice one! When will there be a hibernate plugin? If you really dont want javarebel to be used without a full license you should make it less easier to hack it ;)
  3. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    When will there be a hibernate plugin
    We created the Spring plugin with some help from the Spring folks, otherwise it would be much much harder for use. When we get some Hibernate folks to chip in and help us you can expect a Hibernate plugin.
    If you really dont want javarebel to be used without a full license you should make it less easier to hack it ;)
    Well, in addition to this being illegal we rely on plain old moral values for people to pay for the licenses. It is a pain to protect Java applications from hacking and we mainly try to ensure that you cannot forge licenses and have to apply actual patches for the application to run. We could add self-verification, but a skilled hacker would bypass and an unskilled one wouldn't know where to start anyway. However you can let us know how did you attack the code (support at zeroturnaround dot com) and we might make it harder for the next guy.
  4. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    If you really dont want javarebel to be used without a full license you should make it less easier to hack it ;)

    Well, in addition to this being illegal we rely on plain old moral values for people to pay for the licenses. It is a pain to protect Java applications from hacking and we mainly try to ensure that you cannot forge licenses and have to apply actual patches for the application to run. We could add self-verification, but a skilled hacker would bypass and an unskilled one wouldn't know where to start anyway. However you can let us know how did you attack the code (support at zeroturnaround dot com) and we might make it harder for the next guy.
    Jevgeni, I wholeheartedly approve of the attitude of relying on end-user mores. But... that, and $5 USD, might buy you a cup of coffee. The problem is that people aren't moral. I'm sure that the comment was originally meant in the spirit of "Well, I noticed you don't have much in the way of protecting yourself, not that I would steal myself!" but the sad fact is that people are more than happy to do whatever they can to get away with whatever they can.
  5. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    The problem is that people aren't moral. I'm sure that the comment was originally meant in the spirit of "Well, I noticed you don't have much in the way of protecting yourself, not that I would steal myself!" but the sad fact is that people are more than happy to do whatever they can to get away with whatever they can.
    And what do you suggest we do? The code is already obfuscated and we use PKI to ensure that there is now way to generate licenses. Protecting the application against modification on Java is a very tricky business. Java bytecode is just too high level and editing it is too easy. As I said we could do some more self-verification, but it would only delay a determined hacker. And our sales seem to show that most people do have a conscience or at least don't have the necessary aptitude with the Java bytecode hacking :).
  6. Jevgeni, I am one of your customers that bought Javarebel, and I too was pleasantly surprised by the light DRM you have in there. I am sure developers of the caliber that Zero Turnaround employ could create a fiendish, difficult to crack (and legally unlock!) DRM system for Javarebel, and I am happy you have chosen to instead rely on maturity and morals of your customers, and are focusing on real development. Keep up the good work, sir!
  7. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    I'm not suggesting you do anything. Like I said, I wholeheartedly approve of the stance you've taken. I just wish I had enough faith in people to think that the stance is justified - and I'm glad you seem to think it is.
  8. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    I'm not suggesting you do anything. Like I said, I wholeheartedly approve of the stance you've taken. I just wish I had enough faith in people to think that the stance is justified - and I'm glad you seem to think it is.
    My experience is that the kind of companies that would purchase large numbers of licenses such as enterprise IT shops are unlikely to use software illegally. At least in the US, that is. The reasons for this are 1. They required that the software being used has some sort of support. 2. The risks of stealing are not seen as worth the payoff. If a developer were to hack the software unbeknownst to their supervisors, it's most likely just a matter of time before it's discovered and either purged from the enterprise or purchased. You actually might sell more licenses that way because the software becomes crucial before it can be rejected based on 'enterprise' (read: BS) reasons. On a side note, this is also why open source can be very profitable and you have the side benefit of not wasting time trying to prevent theft which is (I believe) impossible.
  9. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    And our sales seem to show that most people do have a conscience or at least don't have the necessary aptitude with the Java bytecode hacking :).
    I always believe right pricing is the *key*. Personal license of $50 is very fair. It is very hard to convince the management to buy license for everybody unless we prove it is very indispensable to the project. The management needs minium of these information to consider buying this software. - What features it offers - What missing features of IDEA does this offer - If it so good, can we go with Eclipse + JavaRebel and forego IDEA licenses - Finally what all features are applicable to our project :-( To prepare a document to rationalize our claim, I find it easy to spend $50 and buy personal license and close the issue :-) thanks Murali Varadarajan
  10. Re: FYI[ Go to top ]

    I'm sure that the comment was originally meant in the spirit of "Well, I noticed you don't have much in the way of protecting yourself, not that I would steal myself!"
    You are right about that in my case, I bought a personal license the other day