Discussions

News: The next step in Project OpenESB’s evolution: commercial support

  1. The idea behind creating Project OpenESB (https://open-esb.dev.java.net/) three years ago, was to create a fully open source ESB based on open standards. The idea was to create a community where developers could develop components that would plug into this OpenESB or any other standards-compliant ESB. Like every open source project, OpenESB started small: just a few developers, just a few people using the code. Over the past few years, there has been an enormous growth in the number of developers and the number of users. Today OpenESB has evolved into a vibrant community: the project counts more than 60 components contributed by more than 15 different organizations. Although interest in OpenESB has been high, one thing holding back companies putting it into production was lack of commercial support and indemnification. Few people in IT are willing to deploy a system into production without having guarantees that they can fall back on an organization when something goes wrong. The next step in the evolution of an open source project is to have companies backing that project with commercial support. Project OpenESB is now taking that step: Sun Microsystems will be offering commercial support on a subset of the OpenESB components. Sun engineers are working in the community to create a binary distribution of OpenESB called GlassFish ESB. The first milestone-release of this distribution was posted on the OpenESB site today. See https://open-esb.dev.java.net/Downloads.html. In the next two months, testing on this distribution will be completed so that the release can go GA in December. For more information, see https://open-esb.dev.java.net/glassfishesb/

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. Re: JBI components[ Go to top ]

    How will 3rd party JBI components be supported by Sun: https://open-esb.dev.java.net/Components.html will there be an initial roll-out of basic support for the ESB, then depending on demand, additional support for specific components?... douglas dooley douglasdooley.blogspot.com
  3. Re: JBI components[ Go to top ]

    How will 3rd party JBI components be supported by Sun:

    https://open-esb.dev.java.net/Components.html

    will there be an initial roll-out of basic support for the ESB, then depending on demand, additional support for specific components?...

    douglas dooley
    douglasdooley.blogspot.com
    Indeed, the first roll-out will have a limited set of components, and over time more and more components will be added to the distribution. There will be OpenESB components that will not be part of the GlassFish ESB distribution, but still may be commercially supported, either by Sun as part of other product suites (e.g. Java CAPS), or by a partner. Which components will be commercially supported, and which components will only supported in the community, depends on the demand that Sun or its partners sees. HTH, Frank Kieviet OpenESB Community Manager
  4. Re: revenue sharing[ Go to top ]

    Frank, I am going to offer an opinion, and if you have the time and a perspective on it, i would like to hear your feedback: developers will write more components for JBI if there is a web-site that addresses the specifics of the support model, in terms of what constitutes demand-worthy inclusion in the Sun supported distribution of openESB... for instance, that Corba component from Imola: http://wiki.open-esb.java.net/Wiki.jsp?page=CORBABC how, if it is distributed with openESB, will it be split with the supporting vendor/developer?...i guess what i am getting at is to understand how exactly will the hand-off of expertise happen, and how will Sun compensate those component developers that have their components distributed with openESB?... like i said, a ton of details on the policies and plans for support will go a long way to giving an incentive to additional developers to get involved in the JBI effort, which is what is needed at this point... thanks, doug
  5. Re: revenue sharing[ Go to top ]

    Hi Doug, I had to check a few things before I could post an answer... here goes: with respect to what model we're using, we are still learning about the models for contribution and how we can then roll that into a commercially supported offering. Here are the main things we see so far but we are very willing to receive input from folks who have or want to put "skin in the game". So far, we have established good relationships with solution and service delivery companies that want a lightweight ESB. They use OpenESB, with additional contributions that they have made, to solve customer problems and earn revenue. This benefits them as they leverage Sun's investment in building the platform. The community benefits as they often bring unique knowledge and expertise back to the community. What they have been telling us is that the lack of support by a big vendor for the software stack that they bring in, is a problem. Sun supporting the stack makes it an easier sell for these partners to develop a customer solution on top of this stack. This was one of the reasons we chose to do GlassFish ESB. Some partners will leverage Sun's support, some re-sell, others will go-it-alone, which is all perfectly fine. In terms of choosing what components Sun will support: it's basically about demand, driven from our community. We will probably never provide commercial support for all the components in the community. Some may never achieve the quality levels needed or just maybe never be "popular" enough. What will drive our decision is the interest level in the community. How do we turn third-party contribution into commercially supported product: well, it starts with a conversation with the contributor. We then make a judgment on how much it will cost us and decide if its worthwhile. Sometimes the contribution is great and therefore our cost is low. Other times we need to spend more time on adding "systemic qualities", fixing bugs, adding or extending automated test suites, developing documentation, etc. It looks like the model where a partner generates revenue on services, and Sun generates revenue on support of the underlying stack, works out for the benefit for both parties. Nothing is set in stone though, and Sun is willing to work with partners to come up with other mutually beneficial approaches. HTH, Frank Kieviet OpenESB Community Manager blog: http://blogs.sun.com/fkieviet
  6. Re: awesome[ Go to top ]

    Frank, Thank you, that is a very encouraging post, from the standpoint of someone who has been thinking about and looking in to ways to benefit from the immense progress, momentum, and installed base that Glassfish has achieved... I will think about what you have said some more, and will probably write a blog post on my perspective, but it seems to me that this Glassfish ESB distro. is yet another example of how much Sun software is dominating right now, very impressive... b in touch, doug
  7. Re: blog entry[ Go to top ]

    Maybe I am being a little over-the-top, but this whole Glassfish ESB thing has basically thrown the middleware market in to a new gear, and i have put some ideas and arguments down in the form of everyone's favorite mode of communication - - a blog entry: http://douglasdooley.blogspot.com/2008/09/jbi-and-glassfish-esb.html I am half-giddy about the potential of what the Glassfish team is presenting, and half-concerned that i am over-looking something, but until someone comes on here with some dour, antagonistic, and presumably "JBI is irrelevant" counter-argument, i am going to re-state the basic premise of my blog post, in one statement: The long sought model for taking away the inherent competitive advantage of Microsoft has been found...top that...one thing that i keep thinking about all day, and as i wrote the blog entry is basically concerning the JBoss ESB and tools announcement from a few weeks back, when they answered my question about supporting JBI, with a 'not-right-now' type of answer... i just don't get it, what the hell does JBoss have to fear from JBI, i mean i really challenge anyone at JBoss, Mule, Iona, and even Apache to come on this thread and give me a reason why i am off, and why not supporting JBI is a better idea than the marketplace that Sun is creating with the Glassfish ESB... finally, i say, finally, Sun is getting their act together, and exhibit A in this progress remains the moniker which encapsulates all that is good within the company: Glassfish...
  8. Re: blog entry[ Go to top ]

    i just don't get it, what the hell does JBoss have to fear from JBI, i mean i really challenge anyone at JBoss, Mule, Iona, and even Apache to come on this thread and give me a reason why i am off, and why not supporting JBI is a better idea than the marketplace that Sun is creating with the Glassfish ESB
    As an Apache Member, founder & committer of Apache ServiceMix and an IONA employee I don't really see any reason for not supporting JBI - after all integration is about integrating things; so not integrating with all the existing JBI components from Sun, Apache and elsewhere seems just silly. We're certainly committed to supporting JBI and OSGi in ServiceMix - along with Spring, Spring DM along with
  9. Re: blog entry[ Go to top ]

    Hmmm - TSS seemed to trim my post :)
    i just don't get it, what the hell does JBoss have to fear from JBI, i mean i really challenge anyone at JBoss, Mule, Iona, and even Apache to come on this thread and give me a reason why i am off, and why not supporting JBI is a better idea than the marketplace that Sun is creating with the Glassfish ESB
    As an Apache Member, founder & committer of Apache ServiceMix and an IONA employee I don't really see any reason for not supporting JBI - after all integration is about integrating things; so not integrating with all the existing JBI components from Sun, Apache and elsewhere seems just silly. We're certainly committed to supporting JBI and OSGi in ServiceMix - along with Spring, Apache ActiveMQ, Apache Camel and Apache CXF to provide a complete open source integration solution. James Iona Open Source Integration