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News: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8

  1. JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8 (43 messages)

    IntelliJ IDEA 8 supports the widest range of modern tools and frameworks, right out of the box. It is easily tuned to your specific needs and so does not overload you with what you don’t use at the moment. Key new features and improvements: - SQL support - Core Java features: new refactorings, code inspections, tools for working with unit tests, innovative features such as "Dataflow to This" and more - Better performance: reduced startup times, faster project builds, and version control updates - UML class diagrams for exploring the code structure visually - JBoss Seam - Built-in debuggers for JavaScript and Flex - Improved Maven support, with repository browser and archetypes - FreeMarker and Velocity - Spring 2.5, Spring Web Flow, Spring MVC, Spring Dynamic Modules - Struts 2 and GWT 1.5 - RESTful WebServices - and more: http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/features/newfeatures.html Get your copy of the fresh release: http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/download/index.html and experience IntelliJ IDEA 8 live.

    Threaded Messages (43)

  2. Congrats! Has anyone tried v8 yet, and can comment on the performance aspects? We tried to migrate to v7, and found it to be a memory hog.
  3. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    It definitely starts up much faster, but overall felt more sluggish, I reverted back to v7.4. I'll wait for the next patch to try it out again. Anyway, congrats, IntelliJ is an amazing product!
  4. I had the same experience and reverted back to 7.0.4
  5. Is it more sluggish than a tricked out Eclipse? How about compared to Netbeans. Anyone know?
  6. Eclipse is dramatically faster and more responsive on Linux. Netbeans and IntelliJ are barely usable on Linux due to the JVM (I'm using JDK 1.6u10 on a quad core w/ a Quadro graphics card). Eclipse uses SWT whereas Netbeans/IntelliJ are most likely using Swing. On Windows, eclipse seems more responsive, but it's far less noticeable. In my experience, each IDE has some strength that makes it better than the others. IntelliJ seems much more polished than Eclipse & Netbeans. I don't care for the way that IntelliJ and Netbeans handle builds. For both, build is a manual process. For Eclipse, if you want to see all your compiler errors, you save your file and look at your problems tab (which is normally open at all times). There is no concept of a manual build in eclipse. Builds are done, by default, in the background & transparently to the developer. It seems like a minor feature, but it has really affected projects I've worked on. I've noticed that IntelliJ & Netbeans users commit code with far more warnings than Eclipse users as they only see the warnings for the file they have open. My biggest problem with IntelliJ after the horrible Linux performance is that it downloads/updates all your maven dependencies on startup, locking the IDE. The final major issue for me is that TMK, IntelliJ doesn't have a profiler. Certainly their help file in 8.0 has no mention of one. For core Java, Eclipse is king. Netbeans is the king of visual Swing development, and seems to get a lot of great features early (like the built in profiler or JavaFX development). IntelliJ seems to be a more reliable web development platform and has a lot of nice features. As of version 7.0 (I'm not too well versed in the 8.0 features), there wasn't a lot that IntelliJ did that eclipse didn't, however it seems that everything eclipse did, IntelliJ did just a little better (other then the issues I mentioned above). Their price and quality are great. I wish Sun would improve their JVM so I could give them a chance.
  7. Eclipse is dramatically faster and more responsive on Linux. Netbeans and IntelliJ are barely usable on Linux due to the JVM (I'm using JDK 1.6u10 on a quad core w/ a Quadro graphics card). Eclipse uses SWT whereas Netbeans/IntelliJ are most likely using Swing. On Windows, eclipse seems more responsive, but it's far less noticeable.

    In my experience, each IDE has some strength that makes it better than the others. IntelliJ seems much more polished than Eclipse & Netbeans. I don't care for the way that IntelliJ and Netbeans handle builds. For both, build is a manual process. For Eclipse, if you want to see all your compiler errors, you save your file and look at your problems tab (which is normally open at all times).
    And the same thing happens in IntelliJ, not sure what you're talking about. There is no problems tab per say, but the project navigator highlights problems right away and you can see problems in your files as you type, don't even have to save anything.
    I've noticed that IntelliJ & Netbeans users commit code with far more warnings than Eclipse users as they only see the warnings for the file they have open.
    That bologna as well, IntelliJ gives you a warnings dialog before you try to commit. IntelliJ also has far more code inspections than eclipse, which you can toggle on and off.
    The final major issue for me is that TMK, IntelliJ doesn't have a profiler.
    They don't, but they have great plugins into JProfiler and YourKit. Which IMO are above and beyond what free profilers provide out there. But if you want a free profiler, you can always use visualvm or other open source profile tools, of course they are not as polished as YourKit.
    For core Java, Eclipse is king.
    I think you're eating bologna again:-). There is really no doubt even from folks that swear by eclipse that IntelliJ's smart editing capabilities and re-factoring support is light years beyond Eclipse. I've used eclipse numerous times and it's editing support for java is quite weak. Something as simple as context aware completions is way more advanced in IntelliJ.
  8. Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    Hello Ilya, TSS is a friendly forum, there's no need to throw insults. I admit that I've invested a lot into Eclipse and have far less experience with Netbean/IntelliJ and would like to hear your input. First of all, by default, IntelliJ 8.0 doesn't have auto-build. Let me be very specific. I use maven and have a multi-module project. Take a core interface that's been implemented in multiple places and introduce a compiler error by renaming a method. On eclipse, I see 5 errors in my problems tab about 1 second after saving, across multiple modules. In IntelliJ, I see no complaints until build. I opened my project in IntelliJ 8 it has far more warnings in eclipse than IntelliJ 8 (default settings), which I see appear in real time, making it easier to fix. Can you please provide more details about what you're talking about in some of your specific points?
    IntelliJ also has far more code inspections than eclipse, which you can toggle on and off.
    Far more? Could you please elaborate? I think the other readers would be very interested in hearing as I'm sure I'm not the only one who would consider switching if we found strongly compelling reasons to so. Also, have you really turned on all the warnings in Eclipse 3.4? There are quite a few that aren't on by default that I wish were, like forcing @Override/@Deprecated annotations and warning about unused method params. If you want even more, PMD and FindBugs are great plugins to get additional warnings.
    There is really no doubt even from folks that swear by eclipse that IntelliJ's smart editing capabilities and re-factoring support is light years beyond Eclipse.
    No doubt? You can now say there's one doubter :) What can you refactor in IntelliJ that you can't in Eclipse? Again, this is an opportunity to show the Eclipse folks the light.
    I've used eclipse numerous times and it's editing support for java is quite weak. Something as simple as context aware completions is way more advanced in IntelliJ.
    Hate to sound like a broken record, but please tell us more. Eclipse's context-aware completions seem to work perfectly when editing a Java file. What does IntelliJ offer? As said before, Eclipse has many weaknesses. My main reason for not spending more time in other IDEs is that they're painfully slow in Linux. I want to see IntelliJ succeed, but by giving people compelling reasons to switch, not simply insulting those who use other platforms.
  9. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    What can you refactor in IntelliJ that you can't in Eclipse?
    Is a "Extract a code fragment with multiple output values into a method object" refactoring available in eclipse?
  10. Re: Can you elaborate[ Go to top ]

    Hi Steven,
    Take a core interface that's been implemented in multiple places and introduce a compiler error by renaming a method. On eclipse, I see 5 errors in my problems tab about 1 second after saving, across multiple modules. In IntelliJ, I see no complaints until build.
    Autobuild is not really required. In the same file IntelliJ tells you instantly about errors or warning while editing. Pretty much any change you can make that impacts other classes can be done trough refactoring. That way your project will not fail and autobuild is not required. Renaming a method that is used in multiple places is a [SHIFT + F6] away.
    I opened my project in IntelliJ 8 it has far more warnings in eclipse than IntelliJ 8 (default settings)
    So you are comparing the default IntelliJ setting with your Eclipse environment that you tweaked to suite your programming style? You even mention a couple of plugins for Eclipse to help you out there. I've done projects in teams with mixed setups (Eclipse and IntelliJ mostly). And one thing that always sticks out is the enormous amount of IDE warnings I get once I open a file that was created by a team-member using Eclipse. Each IDE can be tweaked and enhanced to warn about a lot of issues, but the default settings is much more strict in IntelliJ.
    IntelliJ also has far more code inspections than eclipse, which you can toggle on and off.
    You want a full list of code inspections? It is huge! And IntelliJ also has plugins to extend it even further. Personally I don't know which IDE has more. But I do know that out-of-the-box the settings for IntelliJ make more sense to me. Some of the warnings that stick out are unused parameters/variables/imports and missing or empty @param tags in Javadoc. When I open code from team-members that use Eclipse those items give me warnings and when an Eclipse user opens up a file that was created by an IntelliJ IDEA user hardly any warnings show up. Then again.. this is shouldn't be an issue, since you need to setup your environment to match the code style that was agreed upon in the team wether you're using IDEA or Eclipse.
    I think the other readers would be very interested in hearing as I'm sure I'm not the only one who would consider switching if we found strongly compelling reasons to so.
    Switching takes time and you need to get adjusted. I've been trying IDEA 8 today and it does feel more sluggish while editing on my Mac Pro. But generally speaking IntelliJ makes me more productive and improves code quality. Using the @Nullable/@NotNull annotations for example, makes NullPointerExceptions a thing of the past and the code analysis tools are very powerful. Howard Lewis Ship (of Tapestry fame) also switched a while ago: http://tapestryjava.blogspot.com/2007/11/another-intellij-zealot.html And he blogged several times about IntelliJ features he loved and which made his life lot easier. But I'm sure there are plenty of stories from other people around that switched to Eclipse as well. Luckily each and everyone has their own preference and the freedom to go with what they prefer.
    What can you refactor in IntelliJ that you can't in Eclipse?
    In the past I've had quite a few problems refactoring in Eclipse actually, but they are usually less common situations. I've seen several code-breaks in projects over the years as well because Eclipse didn't properly refactor everything as expected. One example I remember: A developer using Eclipse once mistakenly created a clone method, overriding the default Object.clone(). The method should have had a custom name though since it was not actually a generic clone implementation. He used the code all though the application though and Eclipse couldn't refactor the name back then. I had to do it using IntelliJ IDEA. It is a couple of years ago already, so Eclipse probably improved those things as well. It is just one issue I remember right now.
    Eclipse's context-aware completions seem to work perfectly when editing a Java file.
    The actual statement was that IDEA's context-aware completions are more advanced, not that Eclipse's completions are broken. I must admit that it's been at least a year since I last used Eclipse myself. But what I found really annoying was that completion in Eclipse didn't work anymore if there was an error in your code a couple of lines before. You had to first fix the code before completion started working again. This meant you had to leave your current thought-proces to fix something else just because the IDE says so. This is not the case with IntelliJ. It seems to go out of its way to help the user instead of the other way around. It all depends on what you are used to and what you prefer. I switched years ago and never looked back, even though the alternative is free and I have to pay for IntelliJ myself (personal license). I think developers should use the tools they like the best, which is why I often work in teams with a mixed toolset. This gives you the best of all worlds and keeps the developers happy.
  11. Re: Can you elaborate[ Go to top ]

    But what I found really annoying was that completion in Eclipse didn't work anymore if there was an error in your code a couple of lines before.
    You had to first fix the code before completion started working again.
    +1. This kind of things (even if they seem so simple) are the difference between a really fine and smart java editor as intellij and a regular one as eclipse.
  12. Re: Can you elaborate[ Go to top ]

    But what I found really annoying was that completion in Eclipse didn't work anymore if there was an error in your code a couple of lines before.
    You had to first fix the code before completion started working again.


    +1.

    This kind of things (even if they seem so simple) are the difference between a really fine and smart java editor as intellij and a regular one as eclipse.
    Well, while I generally like Intellij more, and since I have to work regularily on Javascript, it is a must anyway (no other IDE comes even remotely close) If we look at annoying issues, every IDE has them. In Intellij it is mostly the lack of compile on save like Eclipse and Netbeans 6.5 has it. It makes working with things like javarebel a pain! This should really be finally tackled also by Intellij.
  13. Re: Can you elaborate[ Go to top ]

    In Intellij it is mostly the lack of compile on save like Eclipse and Netbeans 6.5 has it.
    There is 'build on frame-deactivation' in IntelliJ IDEA. When I switch into my browser to test the changes I made to a webapp, IntelliJ will have built the project well before I have had a chance to hit 'refresh'. I haven't been able to find that feature in IDEA 8 though. I hope it is simply because they moved things around and I'm looking in the wrong places. I would really miss that feature.
  14. Re: Can you elaborate[ Go to top ]

    In Intellij it is mostly the lack of compile on save like Eclipse and Netbeans 6.5 has it.

    There is 'build on frame-deactivation' in IntelliJ IDEA. When I switch into my browser to test the changes I made to a webapp, IntelliJ will have built the project well before I have had a chance to hit 'refresh'.

    I haven't been able to find that feature in IDEA 8 though. I hope it is simply because they moved things around and I'm looking in the wrong places. I would really miss that feature.
    This is unfortunately not quite the same. I had used this before 8.0 came out and stopped again. The problem is, that in some projects mainly in ones with many non java resource files, the build can take quite a while, and if you activate it, as soon as you lose focus the build starts and takes half a minute. Quite annoying in this case! The compile on save is really a time saver, you hit the save button and the current file is compiled and errors are shown instantly. This also adds quite a lot of speed in regards to web development, if you use that in combination with javarebel, you basically get instantly your changes deployed to your webapp, just like in a scripting language. I am glad Netbeans has added that feature already, this pretty much was the only feature which kept me stuck to Eclipse for the last 7 years! It was so important to me that I did not want to move over to other choices although I was not that happy with Eclipse all the time!
  15. Re: Can you elaborate[ Go to top ]

    The problem is, that in some projects mainly in ones with many non java resource files, the build can take quite a while, and if you activate it, as soon as you lose focus the build starts and takes half a minute.
    I have worked on large multi-module projects with many Java resource files as well. The build only takes a lot of time if you let IntelliJ do a clean build or if you let IntelliJ create a full war-file. If you setup you development environment to simply deploy to an exploded folder, only the altered files are compiled or copied. You can configure your appserver to look directly in the exploded folder and changes can be picked up immediately with JavaRebel (or in my case Tapestry 5). So it takes some setting up, but you can use this feature as a way of auto-deploying the changed files. I have a double-monitor setup. I usually make the change in IntelliJ and then click on the browser on my second monitor. The frame-deactivation causes IntelliJ to start building/deploying the changed files which should take very little time. I see the progress on my first monitor and I can usually hit the F5 button in the browser straight away.
  16. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    Let me be very specific. I use maven and have a multi-module project. Take a core interface that's been implemented in multiple places and introduce a compiler error by renaming a method. On eclipse, I see 5 errors in my problems tab about 1 second after saving, across multiple modules. In IntelliJ, I see no complaints until build. .
    See, here is the problem. It isn't the tool, but the user. If I do as you suggest and manually rename an interface. I don't see a problem until compiling...unless I go to an implementer of the interface than the flags the problem. I don't see the others. However, who would do that? Perhaps someone who wants to prove a point or doesn't know to use Rename. I've been using idea since version 2 and as far back as version 2 you could use the Rename refactor. When I first tried it, I would right click, go to refactor, see rename. Now, I . Idea takes care of making all the changes. So, how do you want to use the IDE? To me, it makes sense to use the refactor to rename. I don't have to worry about the compiler because Idea makes sure everything is set. To you, you would rename it manually and depend on the compiler to show the problems. Of course, now you've got to go back and manually fix all the problems. Wouldn't the refactor way be faster? I could be wrong, but doesn't Eclipse disallows some functions if the caused compiler problems. For example, routinely will have something like ThisClass myClass = getMyClassFromThing(); This method doesn't exist. I may then write some more, then refactor a block of code into a method, before going back and defining getMyClassFromThing(). My understanding was that Eclipse wouldn't allow say, the refactoring, because it would have a compiler error. If this is true, that's a disadvantage to me. Idea has the gutter which keeps me informed of the state of affairs and I can move around as my thinking allows. I've very rarely hit the scenario you listed because I tend to rename via refactoring.
  17. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    I can move around as my thinking allows.

    I've very rarely hit the scenario you listed because I tend to rename via refactoring.
    One other thing, in the interace, you have a "I". The "I" shows all methods that implement the interface. If you manually change the methodName, the "I" vanishes showing that no one is implementing that interface. Again, a visual indicator that something is wrong. To me, that is a flag that stands out, but I know the look for it. In an implementation, I look for the "I" to show that whoops, I just misspelled something and it really isn't implemeting that class. Also, the class itself ticks red to warn me. As an Eclipse user, you may not be used to Idea nuances, but an experienced Idea user would notice things like this. It takes time for any user to be truly proficient on a complex tool.
  18. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    Let me be very specific. I use maven and have a multi-module project. Take a core interface that's been implemented in multiple places and introduce a compiler error by renaming a method. On eclipse, I see 5 errors in my problems tab about 1 second after saving, across multiple modules. In IntelliJ, I see no complaints until build. .


    See, here is the problem. It isn't the tool, but the user.
    Nah, it's not the user. It's a useful feature in Eclipse. For instance, there are some refactorings that aren't easily possible. Perhaps I'm deciding to break the code because I'm rewriting the internals so heavily. In the case of these situations, i simply break the method and save, and i instantly see all the problems pop up. In some cases, I just want to quickly see what's going to break so i can think about it. Very quick and easy. Works well in a team situation as well. If someone breaks the build, Eclipse will show me as soon as I refresh and compile around it. The compile on save is very useful for working with JavaRebel and things like that also. Don't get me wrong -- IntelliJ is a superb IDE. It's just that I (and many others) really like the background compile on save. And just as Eclipse users tend to underestimate IntelliJ, the opposite happens also. Andrew
  19. U never save in intellij, intellij saves all files for you, i use it since version 3 and haven't saved one file manually (using ctrl-s), never lost any data. You can always revert using ctrl-z or using local history or your version system. So instead of pressing ctrl-s (wich isn't needed) just press ctrl-F9 (make) wich will compile all adjusted java files. I don't see the problem here....
  20. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    Let me be very specific. I use maven and have a multi-module project. Take a core interface that's been implemented in multiple places and introduce a compiler error by renaming a method. On eclipse, I see 5 errors in my problems tab about 1 second after saving, across multiple modules. In IntelliJ, I see no complaints until build. .


    See, here is the problem. It isn't the tool, but the user.


    Nah, it's not the user. It's a useful feature in Eclipse.

    Andrew
    I'm not suggesting that the feature isn't useful, but the example that he gave, that you omitted was one of renaming method interfaces. In that context, the auto-compile, IMO, isn't more useful than the mechanisms available to idea. The indicator that Idea 8.0 currently displays to give you warnings of problems outside of the file in which you are currently working is a direct result(I believe) of me lobbying Intellij for a mechanism that can tell me if I have project wide problems. A background, continous compile wouldn't be a bad thing to have. I would welcome any help catching problems faster, preferably *before* I type. However, the example he gave is well handled by Idea. To me, the background compile is not a deal breaker compared to Eclipse's rigidity with respect to things like the workspace. Idea provides a smoother experience, for me. Someone metioned how auto-complete is affected by errors above the line on which you are working. That's a much bigger deal to me than auto-compile. I routinely will create a method that doesn't exists and will do things with its output before going back to fill it in. For me, I've been able to successfully adapt Idea into even Eclipse only projects without having to change anything about the exist project structure. However, I've worked at Idea only shops and the Eclipse people(one a senior sharp guy) had issues getting eclipse to cooperate in a pretty standard project structure. From what I've seen, if you deviate from Eclipse's expectations too far, you will get problems. At this point, we are into the classic IDE battle. I liked VI over Emacs too. :-)
  21. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    At this point, we are into the classic IDE battle. I liked VI over Emacs too. :-)
    Here's the cool thing from my point of view -- we have at least 3 top class Java IDEs battling it out: IntelliJ, Eclipse and Netbeans. IntelliJ is pure quality, Eclipse is extension focussed and pretty sharp, and Netbeans has improved year on year until it has become a contender. The UML stuff in IntelliJ is very nice, I really like it. However, my mind is now wired to expect project-wide errors on save which until recently was only offered by Eclipse. Netbeans has added this feature also; i'm not sure when it crept in, but they have done it very well. Andrew
  22. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    Read my post man (4 or 5 posts up), just hit ctrl-F9 in stead of ctrl-s and your files will be saved, compiled and project-wide error will be shown...
  23. Re: Can you elaborate?[ Go to top ]

    At this point, we are into the classic IDE battle. I liked VI over Emacs too. :-)

    Here's the cool thing from my point of view -- we have at least 3 top class Java IDEs battling it out: IntelliJ, Eclipse and Netbeans. IntelliJ is pure quality, Eclipse is extension focussed and pretty sharp, and Netbeans has improved year on year until it has become a contender.

    The UML stuff in IntelliJ is very nice, I really like it. However, my mind is now wired to expect project-wide errors on save which until recently was only offered by Eclipse. Netbeans has added this feature also; i'm not sure when it crept in, but they have done it very well.

    Andrew
    It has been added in 6.5, I have to admit i have not tested it yet. But since I am in the stage of going away from Eclipse (too much productivity lost with infighting against various bugs in the JEE parts) I will give Netbeans 6.5 a serious try. I am one of those currently who is moving away from Eclipse due to the other two choices being way better.
  24. It seems like a minor feature, but it has really affected projects I've worked on. I've noticed that IntelliJ & Netbeans users commit code with far more warnings than Eclipse users as they only see the warnings for the file they have open.
    See, I see the opposite. I'm the only Idea user in a sea of Eclipse guys and the number of warnings is stunning. Compiler warnings, tons of glitchly code stuff, bad javadoc. Idea flashes errors all the time *before* you even compile so I'm not sure how you've got it configured. Perhaps you have the code analysis turned off. I almost never get compiler problems. When I do, it is because I didn't catch a problem with a red tick because of all the items the eclipse users let slip into the code. I use Eclipse with GWT Designer, but don't care for the tool in general. Idea allows me to easily adapt to any environment for the build, but eclipse just appears to be much more rigid and where you put things and how you access them. I believe that Idea, by far, is better for Core Java(IDE navigation, Refactoring, etc) while Eclipse has the Plugin support. I've never run Idea on Linux, but on Windows I have few complaints
  25. Eclipse is dramatically faster and more responsive on Linux. Netbeans and IntelliJ are barely usable on Linux due to the JVM
    I have used IntelliJ on Linux for the last 5 years and have had not mayor performance problems at all, at least not more than with eclipse.
    It seems like a minor feature, but it has really affected projects I've worked on. I've noticed that IntelliJ & Netbeans users commit code with far more warnings than Eclipse users as they only see the warnings for the file they have open.
    Mmm, just like David said, i am the only idea user on a bunch of eclipse lovers and my code is way more polished in terms of warnings than theirs.
    For core Java, Eclipse is king
    Well, i could just let pass by all the other comments but this one is just plain false. Are you joking? I have to use eclipse as well (mainly cause bea->oracle workshop is eclipse based and can't get ride of it) and it's miles away from intellij on that aspect, i really miss intellij when work on eclipse. Regards
  26. Polished?[ Go to top ]

    Mmm, just like David said, i am the only idea user on a bunch of eclipse lovers and my code is way more polished in terms of warnings than theirs.
    Well, the level of polish in your code is probably based more on your experience level or general skill. Every beginner I know starts out on Eclipse and most of the best programmers I've worked with use a mix of the IDEs. Most IntelliJ coders I work with write well written code, because, on average, they're more experienced than the average eclipse user. Although I could have phrased it much better, I wasn't intending to insult their coding ability but stating that they miss a lot of compiler warnings because their tool doesn't show them warnings in real-time. I've seen team members switch IDEs on me when 7.0 came out and had to have discussions with them about their increase in minor compiler warnings (like unused params). Although this is largely a subjective debate, I have to disagree with you on the performance comparison. Do you really use Linux as you primary development platform? IntelliJ 8.0 take seconds to render it's drop down menus on first load and has visibly slower rendering even after every drop down has been loaded already. Eclipse is indistinguishable from a native app, like GEdit. When I work on Windows, which is very rare, IntelliJ performs a lot better. If I used Windows, I'd probably switch to IntelliJ.
  27. Re: Polished?[ Go to top ]

    Hi Steve.
    I've seen team members switch IDEs on me when 7.0 came out and had to have discussions with them about their increase in minor compiler warnings (like unused params).
    Not sure how does your team have intellij configured but at least that "unused params" warning is definitively active on a default intellij installation. May be i should compare warning to warning both IDEs in order to comment with all certainty, course if i have the time ;-).
    Do you really use Linux as you primary development platform?
    8 years ago i don't use windows for any thing but play some games. May be i should install intellij on windows and play with it to compare the performance. Not tested v8 yet, but at least with 7 i work pleasantly. Best Regards.
  28. Re: Polished?[ Go to top ]

    Mmm, just like David said, i am the only idea user on a bunch of eclipse lovers and my code is way more polished in terms of warnings than theirs.


    Well, the level of polish in your code is probably based more on your experience level or general skill. Every beginner I know starts out on Eclipse and most of the best programmers I've worked with use a mix of the IDEs.

    Most IntelliJ coders I work with write well written code, because, on average, they're more experienced than the average eclipse user.

    Although I could have phrased it much better, I wasn't intending to insult their coding ability but stating that they miss a lot of compiler warnings because their tool doesn't show them warnings in real-time.

    I've seen team members switch IDEs on me when 7.0 came out and had to have discussions with them about their increase in minor compiler warnings (like unused params).

    Although this is largely a subjective debate, I have to disagree with you on the performance comparison. Do you really use Linux as you primary development platform? IntelliJ 8.0 take seconds to render it's drop down menus on first load and has visibly slower rendering even after every drop down has been loaded already. Eclipse is indistinguishable from a native app, like GEdit.

    When I work on Windows, which is very rare, IntelliJ performs a lot better. If I used Windows, I'd probably switch to IntelliJ.
    Idea does show problems in real-time. (Undeclared variables, unreachable statements, missing expressions, variables not being used...all out of the box, heck Resharper(Intellij's VS C# tool) does the same thing. And you absolutely get warnings about unused parameters. You are simply not correct on this issue. Perhaps the problem is that they ignore the warnings or turned them off in their tool?
  29. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    It felt fine to me. I only installed the plugins I needed though. If you installed everything then performance is going to suffer.
  30. Congrats! Has anyone tried v8 yet, and can comment on the performance aspects? We tried to migrate to v7, and found it to be a memory hog.
    It is always important to ramp up the memory requirements with Intellij. v8 with a mac is buggy, crashes. You need to delete a jar out of its lib directory (growl.jar) to get past it. This is a known issue and you'll have to wait for a patch. Intellij has handled Maven really well but with V8 they tried to make it too smart and now it won't work with GMaven: (for some reason you can't override the settings to ignore the entire target folder when there is a generated-sources folder inside it) Anyway, as much as I like IDEA, I can't recommend v8 right now. I'd go instead with the most recent build of V7 (google for their EAP page of Selena) which I thought hummed along quite nicely. With IDEA it is important to look at its own logs and make sure none of the plugins are throwing errors. Disable any that you do not use, e.g. ideaTalk. In version 7 for the mac it was always important to delete fslogger out of the bin directory of the IDEA home folder and ramp up the memory in the plist.
  31. Just wanted to expand on my answer and say the issues I'm having are with the mac version. Windows version may be more stable though the maven/gmaven problem I bet still exists.
  32. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    I've been using version 8 preview for quite some time now, and it has been great, so I never reverted back to 7. The only beef I had with 8 preview was that when you killed a debugged process, the debugger would detach but the process would sometimes not get killed, so it had to get killed with kill -9. I think that's why they added the 'skull' button, to kill -9 a process... :-) This is gone from GA. This seems to be fixed with 8 GA. I find 8 GA fast, responsive and quick. I allocate 800MB to it (mx and ms) and 120M for perm generation. It works very well for me and I haven't yet run into any problems. I love IDEA ! Bela P.S.: I'm in no way affiliated with JetBrains
  33. Actually having used Eclipse, Intellij and Netbeans. I must say Intellij definitely is the best of the bunch. To make it simple, eclipse from the refactoring and editing capabilities always seems to be 1-2 versions behind. Besides that, Eclipse has serious problems in the area of bugs. Ever since the WTP has seen the light of day editing JEE projects with a core Eclipse distro has been a huge pain. Back then in 1.0 it was unusable period, nowadays it is usable but with hickups and holes in the configuration left and right. Add to that that there still is no decent subversion support out of the box. Eclipse only is usable within a distro. For me MyEclipse has made JEE development bearable. While not perfect either, it works way better than anything the eclipse world has to offer on its own. Also the update server situation and add your own extensions situation has become way worse. The entire infrastructure needs a serious cleanup. You often get the same entries two or three times within the same update server and you dont have a chance to know whether it hoses your install or not. The solution again is to pay for an Eclipse distro. Intellij however seems to be way more polished with scripting support second to none currently, and lightyears ahead of everyone else. Maven support also is way better. Now to Netbeans, I always liked it but have stopped using it seriously years ago. But things might change with 6.5 again since it finally has gotten compile on save. But now already it is way better than Eclipse but falls short in the Scripting area to Intellij! The funny thing is, that Netbeans becomes more and more like Intellij with every version and Intellij becomes more and more like Netbeans with every version. My guess is, that Netbeans will always be a little bit behind Intellij in the Editing areas, while Intellij over the long run will get the full visual capabilities where Netbeans currently shines. But the Eclipse project has a serious problem while the Netbeans team got their act together around 5.5, and the rate it is improving is amazing! Funny thing is Eclipse seemed to have started to stall around the same time while both other IDEs have recovered. Eclipse nowadays faces the problems Intellij had after the Visual Fabrique desaster and Netbeans before 5.5, they simply need to shift their priorities and tighten the development again!
  34. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    I have upgraded from version 7 to 8 and I am quite happy with it. It is faster indeed. The only problem is that not all plugins are compatible with new IDEA and you find it out only when it crashes IDEA. I had to reinstall whole IDE to fix it.
  35. I like being able to open pom.xml files for Maven modules. That didn't work with v7. I'll have to figure out a way to set IntelliJ project settings on a per-Maven project basis, which would be imported into IntelliJ when it reads a pom file. There's the beginnings of support for that in the IntelliJ/Maven plugin, I believe. Cheers, David Flux - Java Job Scheduler. File Transfer. Workflow.
  36. I have used v8 for last few days, and it about the same as before 7.0.4 for me. It getting slow when loading a lot of files. In both cases, I have changed my JVM options to make 512M for the heap and 240M for the permanent memory. I am using a Quad Core with 4GB of memory and 2.4GH of CPU; running Debian. I am not doing a lot of UI development, so many of the features I don't care too much. I do like the SQL support. So I don't need to use SQLPlus or Squirrel just for simple search and look up. I do wish they would have a vendor specific plugin and have vendor context specific features. For example, "desc " for oracle Database so I don't need to open up data source and borrows through the table column names. Another thing annoys me a little bit is that for each query it brings up a new result tab. If you query 10 times, there are 10 result tabs. In many case, you don't need to save them, you have to manually close them one by one. Hope they can simply have a check box, indicating you want to save prev. result or not. If not, then just use the existing result tab. My biggest complain to IntelliJ is that each time I open up the IDE and it tries automatically connect to CVS Server. Since I am working through VPN, something vpn is not connected or down, the IDE will basically frozen for many minutes (I never actually count it, but it could be 5-10 minutes), before it eventually time out and ask you if you want to work off line, and there is no way to control this behavior (for example, set default to be offtime).
  37. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    Unfortunately,there is no AspectJ support and JetBrains have no any comments for this topic. Forum: AspectJ Support (EAP) Maybe JetBrains will care this only when all user is gone. To Steven Boscarine: I agree with you ,
    there wasn't a lot that IntelliJ did that eclipse didn't, however it seems that everything eclipse did, IntelliJ did just a little better
    There is more and more great tools for eclipse. Thanks· Yang
  38. If Eclipse is better than Intellij Idea then why we have different flavours for eclipse like myeclipse, exadel, easy eclipse...... what i feel after working with Eclipse, Netbeans and Intellij Idea is Intellij Idea has very smart capabilites that will speed up your work. Just look at the support for Spring in intellij idea, it is out of box when compare to other IDE's. About Netbeans strictly speaking it need much more time to get mature to give some competition to Intellij Idea or Eclipse.
  39. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    Unfortunately,there is no AspectJ support and JetBrains have no any comments for this topic. Forum: AspectJ Support (EAP) Maybe JetBrains will care this only when all user is gone. To Steven Boscarine: I agree with you ,
    there wasn't a lot that IntelliJ did that eclipse didn't, however it seems that everything eclipse did, IntelliJ did just a little better
    There is more and more great tools for eclipse. Thanks Yang
  40. Re: JetBrains Has Released IntelliJ IDEA 8[ Go to top ]

    I am sory to submit two twice,but it's seems TSS have not process the duplicate form submit problem. I cann't delete the duplicated post also, sorry. Thanks Yang
  41. I've been an eclipse user for about 5 years and I'm basically happy with it. No need to gripe aboud a free application anyway. My colleages and me have evaluated intellij this summer, but stopped when we found out that netbeans 6.5 and intellij 8 were close (and eclipse 3.4 just released). I really loved the "Unused Declaration" inspection in intellij. There's no better way of cleaning up code than removing unused code in my opinion. Is there anything comparable in eclipse (without any plugins) ? I am not talking about unused private methods etc. but about public declarations (method, variables etc.) that are not referenced in the currently open projects. On Remote Desktop Sessions (RDP) eclipse sometimes seems to screw up the (windows) clipboard. Have searched the web for this issue but I seem to be the only one. Anybody else with this problem or am I just going crazy ? Sometimes I'm just trying to cut/copy/paste a few lines lines of code in eclipse and the whole RDP session becomes unresponsive. If that happens I have to kill the RDP process and connect again. Not a big deal, no data lost, but annoying. Maybe intellij is better, but who knows. Sometimes tasks perceived by me as rather simple can take ages in eclipse, e.g. renaming a package without any classes. Also eclipse seems to become slower after a few weeks. Don't know if intellij suffers similar issues. Such issues crop up only after a few months of production I guess.
  42. I've been an eclipse user for about 5 years and I'm basically happy with it. No need to gripe aboud a free application anyway.

    My colleages and me have evaluated intellij this summer, but stopped when we found out that netbeans 6.5 and intellij 8 were close (and eclipse 3.4 just released).

    I really loved the "Unused Declaration" inspection in intellij. There's no better way of cleaning up code than removing unused code in my opinion. Is there anything comparable in eclipse (without any plugins) ? I am not talking about unused private methods etc. but about public declarations (method, variables etc.) that are not referenced in the currently open projects.

    On Remote Desktop Sessions (RDP) eclipse sometimes seems to screw up the (windows) clipboard. Have searched the web for this issue but I seem to be the only one. Anybody else with this problem or am I just going crazy ? Sometimes I'm just trying to cut/copy/paste a few lines lines of code in eclipse and the whole RDP session becomes unresponsive. If that happens I have to kill the RDP process and connect again. Not a big deal, no data lost, but annoying. Maybe intellij is better, but who knows.

    Sometimes tasks perceived by me as rather simple can take ages in eclipse, e.g. renaming a package without any classes. Also eclipse seems to become slower after a few weeks. Don't know if intellij suffers similar issues. Such issues crop up only after a few months of production I guess.
    I've never seen that problem under Idea. I used to do a ton of stuff on my work machine from home via VPN and RDP.
  43. No Drools Support?[ Go to top ]

    Still no Drools support :( Mark http://blog.athico.com/ The Drools Blog
  44. Very annoying bug in 8[ Go to top ]

    Right-clicking a file in a project and selecting copy reference is broken. Same is feature is broken from the "Edit" menu - very annoying, but otherwise nice release.