NetBeans IDE 6.5 Available for Download

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News: NetBeans IDE 6.5 Available for Download

  1. NetBeans IDE 6.5 Available for Download (47 messages)

    New features include a robust IDE for PHP, JavaScript debugging for Firefox and IE, and support for Groovy and Grails. NetBeans IDE 6.5 also delivers a number of enhancements for Java, Ruby on Rails, and C/C++ development. Java highlights include: built-in support for Hibernate, Eclipse project import, and compile on save. Combining an excellent out-of-the-box experience, compelling features, and a great plug-in ecosystem, NetBeans IDE 6.5 is a must- download for all developers. Download NetBeans IDE 6.5 http://communications1.sun.com/r/c/r?2.1.3J1.2U2.11J8XW.CCDJGu..T.Ffaa.2CRg.DPBWEXO0 More information about NetBeans IDE 6.5: - NetBeans IDE 6.5 Features http://communications1.sun.com/r/c/r?2.1.3J1.2U2.11J8XW.CCDJGu..T.Ffac.2CRg.DPHKEXQ0 - NetBeans IDE 6.5 Tutorials and Documentation http://communications1.sun.com/r/c/r?2.1.3J1.2U2.11J8XW.CCDJGu..T.Ffae.2CRg.DPMeEXS0 - Guided Video Tour of NetBeans IDE 6.5 http://communications1.sun.com/r/c/r?2.1.3J1.2U2.11J8XW.CCDJGu..T.Ffag.2CRg.DPSSEXU0

    Threaded Messages (47)

  2. I have been using the RC of Netbeas IDE 6.5 for quite some time and I have to admit, it is the most powerful IDE in the business today. The ease of use and already package libraries and code templates makes your life much easier. All of the above the IDE support for Javascript and the code intellisense is a great feature to have. Good work Netbeans team. RJ
  3. I have been using the RC of Netbeas IDE 6.5 for quite some time and I have to admit, it is the most powerful IDE in the business today. The ease of use and already package libraries and code templates makes your life much easier. All of the above the IDE support for Javascript and the code intellisense is a great feature to have. Good work Netbeans team.

    RJ
    Not the most powerful ide, but the most powerful opensource IDE... Intellij still has unsurpassed refactoring of scripting languages! Besides many other things, but Netbeans definitely is more powerful than Eclipse!
  4. yeah much better compare to eclipse[ Go to top ]

    I was using eclipse for Java & GWT projects. Now working on Ruby and thought of Netbeans which has built in support for so many language without doing any download (eclipse makes you do that) Overall one stop open source and better compare to Eclipse in my experience..
  5. Re: yeah much better compare to eclipse[ Go to top ]

    I was using eclipse for Java & GWT projects. Now working on Ruby and thought of Netbeans which has built in support for so many language without doing any download (eclipse makes you do that)

    Overall one stop open source and better compare to Eclipse in my experience..
    Actually the number of plugins in Eclipse does not say anything. Eclipses plugins are in a huge mess, probably one nature of opensource, but definitely one problem of lack of central direction. I recently dropped eclipse due to constantly running against small bugs in various extensions to the core which made my productivity constantly drop for several hours per week. Eclipse simply has an excellent core and a load of somehow working but not a single one finished extension. The main issue which made me switch was simply the constant bugs in the WTP which in its third incarnation is not unsuable anymore like it was in its first, but I think the guys behind it should do a feature stop for one year and should iron the bugs out. JEE is not an unimportant part of the java landscape and having a tooling which constantly shows bugs in this area is a showstopper for many! Many I know who used to use the WTP have switched to other tools outside of eclipse due to its bugs! Also please, clean up the update site, you get at least three entries some even conflicting for every extension hostet there. How hard is it to get a decent update site? Intellij does it and Netbeans is the primary example of how to do such a thing.
  6. I really like NetBeans except for one thing that is a showstopper for me: the font rendering. I'm aware that this is rather a Swing issue rather than a NetBeans-specific issue, but it remains an issue. I've googled and googled for a solution to make fonts appear as nicely as native fonts on my Linux (Ubuntu) box, without success. The improvements I have found are not enough to make the fonts look like they do in Eclipse - basically native font rendering. Am I out of luck concerning this issue?
  7. I really like NetBeans except for one thing that is a showstopper for me: the font rendering. I'm aware that this is rather a Swing issue rather than a NetBeans-specific issue, but it remains an issue.

    I've googled and googled for a solution to make fonts appear as nicely as native fonts on my Linux (Ubuntu) box, without success. The improvements I have found are not enough to make the fonts look like they do in Eclipse - basically native font rendering.

    Am I out of luck concerning this issue?
    I haven't been able to see any difference with native applications and NetBeans on OpenSuSE. So, I don't know if it is a Swing issue 100% or not. I don't use Ubuntu, so I don't know about that, but I am using Gnome at the moment, and have been using KDE for along time. On KDE the IDE defaulted to the Swing LNF instead of GTK, but with both the fonts etc all look OK. I am using JDK 1.5 and 1.6 depending on what I'm working on. What is it that you are seeing? I know of others using Ubuntu and NB.
  8. I really like NetBeans except for one thing that is a showstopper for me: the font rendering. I'm aware that this is rather a Swing issue rather than a NetBeans-specific issue, but it remains an issue.

    I've googled and googled for a solution to make fonts appear as nicely as native fonts on my Linux (Ubuntu) box, without success. The improvements I have found are not enough to make the fonts look like they do in Eclipse - basically native font rendering.

    Am I out of luck concerning this issue?


    I haven't been able to see any difference with native applications and NetBeans on OpenSuSE. So, I don't know if it is a Swing issue 100% or not. I don't use Ubuntu, so I don't know about that, but I am using Gnome at the moment, and have been using KDE for along time. On KDE the IDE defaulted to the Swing LNF instead of GTK, but with both the fonts etc all look OK. I am using JDK 1.5 and 1.6 depending on what I'm working on. What is it that you are seeing? I know of others using Ubuntu and NB.
    Hi Wade, Thanks for answering my post. I just tried NetBeans 6.5 with JDK6 and have taken a screenshot of the editor: http://www.stripesbook.com/netbeans.png Compare this with Eclipse, where the font is much smoother and nicer: http://www.stripesbook.com/eclipse.png I selected the same font in both cases, but you can see that clearly there is a difference. NetBeans does not display the font to look the same as the native font. Any ideas? Thanks again! Freddy Daoud http://www.stripesbook.com
  9. Fonts look the same in both the screen shots sir
  10. Fonts look the same in both the screen shots sir
    Look closely, they do not. The fonts in NetBeans are thinner and more ragged. Eclipse fonts look the same as native fonts in all other apps. Not so with NetBeans.
  11. You're kidding right? hahaha, you won't use a better tool because the font looks different. I don't necessarily even see one being better than the other, rather they just look different. Eclipse font looks bold. I see if a font was not readable or somehow strained your eyes and made it unbearable to work with all day, but you a making a laughing manner out of it, should of just kept these screenshots. Ilya
  12. You're kidding right? hahaha, you won't use a better tool because the font looks different. I don't necessarily even see one being better than the other, rather they just look different. Eclipse font looks bold. I see if a font was not readable or somehow strained your eyes and made it unbearable to work with all day, but you a making a laughing manner out of it, should of just kept these screenshots.

    Ilya
    I'm not kidding, and it's an issue for me. I understand if it's not an issue for you, but please don't ridicule. There are plenty of other people who have posted around the 'Net complaining about the font rendering in NetBeans, especially running on Linux. I'm aware that it's not a big deal to some. To me, it's a showstopper, because I look at code all day and when I try NetBeans, it really does strain my eyes for how ragged the fonts look. Especially when I switch to any other application and the fonts are rendered natively, and look much smoother. It's night and day to me. Maybe the screenshots don't show enough of the difference. I'd compromise if NetBeans was the only IDE around, but it's not. If the features in NetBeans get a 19/20 on my scorecard, then Eclipse gets 18/20, so NetBeans is not better enough than Eclipse for me to sacrifice how much nicer the fonts look when rendered the same as everything else on my desktop. Ilya, believe me, I know it sounds ridiculous, and I really wish I could ignore the difference! But I can't. Maybe it's because I got that laser eye surgery? ;-) Peace. Freddy Daoud http://www.stripesbook.com
  13. Well, yeah, I guess I should I figured you were on Linux:-) Sorry, the font looks fine here on my OS X:-), and I always figure that folks are using the real OS :-) Though your screenshots didn't look too bad either. Not a Netbeans user though, I've been a fan for a while, just hard to put away that beautiful IntelliJ :-) Ilya
  14. OSX fonts are also different[ Go to top ]

    Actually even on OSX the fonts look slightly different. Try Netbeans under Java 6 and change the default font to Monaco Plain 11 (the font used in Eclipse by default). Then compare this to Eclipse. At first glance they look identical but look closely. The Netbeans rendering is slightly 'thinner'. I don't know why that is. It doesn't really bother me but I wanted to point it out. The issue is much worse on Windows and Linux.
  15. Re: OSX fonts are also different[ Go to top ]

    Actually even on OSX the fonts look slightly different.
    Try Netbeans under Java 6 and change the default font to Monaco Plain 11 (the font used in Eclipse by default). Then compare this to Eclipse. At first glance they look identical but look closely. The Netbeans rendering is slightly 'thinner'.

    I don't know why that is. It doesn't really bother me but I wanted to point it out. The issue is much worse on Windows and Linux.
    I've mentioned several times in this thread that JDK 6 update **10** will fix this problem because it uses the OS to render fonts rather than JRE's built in font rendering. I think Sun is working with Apple on porting the changes from update 10 to OSXn, so that feature isn't available on OSX yet. So, just in case I wasn't clear... font rendering is *no longer* a valid point against using NetBeans, at least on Windows. It is completely resolved and renders 100% accurately because it uses the OS to render. You don't get this without JDK 6 update 10 or newer. This feature probably works in Linux and Solaris too, but not OSX until Apple finishes porting the changes.
  16. Comments to the fonts![ Go to top ]

    Actually even on OSX the fonts look slightly different.
    Try Netbeans under Java 6 and change the default font to Monaco Plain 11 (the font used in Eclipse by default). Then compare this to Eclipse. At first glance they look identical but look closely. The Netbeans rendering is slightly 'thinner'.

    I don't know why that is. It doesn't really bother me but I wanted to point it out. The issue is much worse on Windows and Linux.


    I've mentioned several times in this thread that JDK 6 update **10** will fix this problem because it uses the OS to render fonts rather than JRE's built in font rendering. I think Sun is working with Apple on porting the changes from update 10 to OSXn, so that feature isn't available on OSX yet.

    So, just in case I wasn't clear... font rendering is *no longer* a valid point against using NetBeans, at least on Windows. It is completely resolved and renders 100% accurately because it uses the OS to render. You don't get this without JDK 6 update 10 or newer. This feature probably works in Linux and Solaris too, but not OSX until Apple finishes porting the changes.
    Actually it has not been for me for a long time, seeing the screenshots, I probably would not have even noticed any difference, btw. I really prefer the rendering on the Netbeans screenshot over the native font rendering on Eclipse. But it seems everybodies taste seems to be different, I guess. Showbreaker was for me back in the days when Netbeans did not render aliased, but that issue has been resolve a while ago. Funny thing is, since the font rendering code in the JDK is from Adobe to my knowledge that the JDK representation of the fonts probably is more accurate than the one being done by Linux and probably uses the real fonts, while Linux has to revert to clones of the fonts (no matter being it the Microsoft fonts, or some clones by a third party)
  17. Fonts on XP w/ 1.6.0_10 still different[ Go to top ]

    I just compared Netbeans 6.5 and Eclipse 3.4.1 (ganymede-SR1) under Windows XP using JSE 1.6.0_10. The font rendering is still different. By default: Netbeans uses Monospace Plain 12 Eclipse uses Courier New Regular 10 I changed both to use the same font (but different than their defaults) in the Java editor. I didn't find any OT, TT, or other font that looked the same in both IDE's. What settings and versions are you using to prove that the font rendering is identical in both IDE's? OSX rendering is still better than what I'm seeing in XP... I think Apple has incorporated changes from update 10 in the latest release of JSE 6 (Sun says it's the equivalent to update 10 when it comes to JavaFX so at least some graphics changes have been applied). Again, I was responding specifically to the OSX comment (not made by you). I'm not saying the rendering is an issue for me but I can see how it can be an issue for others if it is not rendering 100% like the host OS.
  18. Re: OSX fonts are also different[ Go to top ]

    Ryan,
    I've mentioned several times in this thread that JDK 6 update **10** will fix this problem because it uses the OS to render fonts rather than JRE's built in font rendering. I think Sun is working with Apple on porting the changes from update 10 to OSXn, so that feature isn't available on OSX yet.

    So, just in case I wasn't clear... font rendering is *no longer* a valid point against using NetBeans, at least on Windows. It is completely resolved and renders 100% accurately because it uses the OS to render. You don't get this without JDK 6 update 10 or newer. This feature probably works in Linux and Solaris too, but not OSX until Apple finishes porting the changes.
    I've mentioned several times that my issue is with NetBeans under **Linux**. JDK 6 update 10 DOES NOT use the OS's settings to render fonts; this is documented by Sun. So, just in case I wasn't clear... font rendering is still a valid point against using NetBeans under Linux.
  19. Re: OSX fonts are also different[ Go to top ]

    JDK 6 update 10 DOES NOT use the OS's settings to render fonts; this is documented by Sun.
    Under Linux, that is. Just to be clear. Yes, under Windows it works.
  20. I really like NetBeans except for one thing that is a showstopper for me: the font rendering. I'm aware that this is rather a Swing issue rather than a NetBeans-specific issue, but it remains an issue.

    I've googled and googled for a solution to make fonts appear as nicely as native fonts on my Linux (Ubuntu) box, without success. The improvements I have found are not enough to make the fonts look like they do in Eclipse - basically native font rendering.

    Am I out of luck concerning this issue?


    I haven't been able to see any difference with native applications and NetBeans on OpenSuSE. So, I don't know if it is a Swing issue 100% or not. I don't use Ubuntu, so I don't know about that, but I am using Gnome at the moment, and have been using KDE for along time. On KDE the IDE defaulted to the Swing LNF instead of GTK, but with both the fonts etc all look OK. I am using JDK 1.5 and 1.6 depending on what I'm working on. What is it that you are seeing? I know of others using Ubuntu and NB.


    Hi Wade,

    Thanks for answering my post. I just tried NetBeans 6.5 with JDK6 and have taken a screenshot of the editor:

    http://www.stripesbook.com/netbeans.png

    Compare this with Eclipse, where the font is much smoother and nicer:

    http://www.stripesbook.com/eclipse.png

    I selected the same font in both cases, but you can see that clearly there is a difference. NetBeans does not display the font to look the same as the native font.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks again!

    Freddy Daoud
    http://www.stripesbook.com
    I don't have any idea. I looked around on my system, and different things look different. GEdit and NetBeans look the same when GEdit is using my System font. KWrite looked different than them both and more like your Eclipse screen shot. GEdit with its own fonts looks different than everything. All in all though the fonts are very readable in everything, and my NB fonts look different than yours. My System font is set to Monospace for the editor type font. Then I have Sans as my other fonts such as menu and file name views etc. I don't have Eclipse on that laptop at the moment though as I upgraded from 10.3 to 11.0 recently and haven't used Eclipse on 11.0. The fonts that look like your Eclipse shot from KWrite I can't really find in any of my Gnome applications unless I tell them to not use the System font, and then some are pretty close. KDE applications tend to look more like your Eclipse fonts. Are you using Kubuntu? I'll see if I can get Eclipse on that laptop sometime next week just to check it out.
  21. I really like NetBeans except for one thing that is a showstopper for me: the font rendering. I'm aware that this is rather a Swing issue rather than a NetBeans-specific issue, but it remains an issue.

    I've googled and googled for a solution to make fonts appear as nicely as native fonts on my Linux (Ubuntu) box, without success. The improvements I have found are not enough to make the fonts look like they do in Eclipse - basically native font rendering.

    Am I out of luck concerning this issue?


    I haven't been able to see any difference with native applications and NetBeans on OpenSuSE. So, I don't know if it is a Swing issue 100% or not. I don't use Ubuntu, so I don't know about that, but I am using Gnome at the moment, and have been using KDE for along time. On KDE the IDE defaulted to the Swing LNF instead of GTK, but with both the fonts etc all look OK. I am using JDK 1.5 and 1.6 depending on what I'm working on. What is it that you are seeing? I know of others using Ubuntu and NB.


    Hi Wade,

    Thanks for answering my post. I just tried NetBeans 6.5 with JDK6 and have taken a screenshot of the editor:

    http://www.stripesbook.com/netbeans.png

    Compare this with Eclipse, where the font is much smoother and nicer:

    http://www.stripesbook.com/eclipse.png

    I selected the same font in both cases, but you can see that clearly there is a difference. NetBeans does not display the font to look the same as the native font.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks again!

    Freddy Daoud
    http://www.stripesbook.com


    I don't have any idea. I looked around on my system, and different things look different. GEdit and NetBeans look the same when GEdit is using my System font. KWrite looked different than them both and more like your Eclipse screen shot. GEdit with its own fonts looks different than everything. All in all though the fonts are very readable in everything, and my NB fonts look different than yours.

    My System font is set to Monospace for the editor type font. Then I have Sans as my other fonts such as menu and file name views etc. I don't have Eclipse on that laptop at the moment though as I upgraded from 10.3 to 11.0 recently and haven't used Eclipse on 11.0. The fonts that look like your Eclipse shot from KWrite I can't really find in any of my Gnome applications unless I tell them to not use the System font, and then some are pretty close.

    KDE applications tend to look more like your Eclipse fonts. Are you using Kubuntu? I'll see if I can get Eclipse on that laptop sometime next week just to check it out.
    I am using Ubuntu. To be it's very easy to spot: editors that use Swing vs. editors that do not. For example, jEdit is the same as NetBeans, i.e. the fonts don't look as nice. Try using another font, but the same font, in all editors and I'm sure you'll see that Eclipse and KWrite look the same, but not NetBeans. Another test: compare with the fixed-width font that you see in your browser. Simply put, Eclipse (and KWrite, if I understand your post correctly) render fonts the same as native. NetBeans and jEdit use Swing, which does its own font rendering, not the native font rendering. Thanks for checking it out. Looks like I'm out of luck for NetBeans editor font. :(
  22. Swing font rendering on Linux[ Go to top ]

    Hi Freddy, Try setting the awt.useSystemAAFontSettings property to "lcd", "on", or "gasp". http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/2d/flags.html#aaFonts On my openSUSE 11.0 I've set Courier New, Verdana, and Georgia (Core fonts for the Web) as default in jre/lib/fontconfig.properties and use -Dawt.useSystemAAFontSettings=gasp for running Swing applications.
  23. Re: Swing font rendering on Linux[ Go to top ]

    Hi Freddy,

    Try setting the awt.useSystemAAFontSettings property to "lcd", "on", or "gasp".
    http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/2d/flags.html#aaFonts

    On my openSUSE 11.0 I've set Courier New, Verdana, and Georgia (Core fonts for the Web) as default in
    jre/lib/fontconfig.properties and use -Dawt.useSystemAAFontSettings=gasp for running Swing applications.
    Hi Taras, thanks for your comment. I had tried that before and it doesn't fix the problem. I am on JDK6 update 10 but it is documented that using native font rendering is for Windows, not for Linux. I've found a font, "Droid Sans Mono", that actually renders pretty good in NetBeans/Linux. Still not like native, but good enough so I'll stop complaining for now ;-)


  24. Hi Wade,

    Thanks for answering my post. I just tried NetBeans 6.5 with JDK6 and have taken a screenshot of the editor:

    http://www.stripesbook.com/netbeans.png

    Compare this with Eclipse, where the font is much smoother and nicer:

    http://www.stripesbook.com/eclipse.png

    I selected the same font in both cases, but you can see that clearly there is a difference. NetBeans does not display the font to look the same as the native font.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks again!

    Freddy Daoud
    http://www.stripesbook.com
    The problem is that you need JDK 6 update 10. Well, at least that will completely fix the problem on Windows. Not sure about Linux. Give it a try. Update 10 delegates font rendering to the OS.
  25. As someone else stated, to get native fonts you have to get Java 6 update 10 (at least on Windows) But I was curious if Netbeans has something like Eclipse's Remote Systems Explorer with SSL/SSH support? I'm really impressed with Netbeans though. It's come a long way in recent years.
  26. Eclipse RSE[ Go to top ]

    Frank, I have yet to prove that native font rendering on Windows is working 100% the way it should. Have you verified this behavior or are you relying on Sun's documentation? Netbeans 6.5 effectively does not have ssh/terminal support like Eclipse does. I've seen one or two plugins that integrated the java ssl library but I don't think they've been kept up to date. That's a relatively new feature Eclipse and I think it's one of those things that most developers would say is unecessary until it's a proven feature in an IDE (in this case Eclipse). I think it's very important and hope that a similar plugin is created for Netbeans. I wouldn't mind an X Server plugin (with an exposed API) to cover the majority of cases.
  27. Re: Eclipse RSE[ Go to top ]

    Frank, I have yet to prove that native font rendering on Windows is working 100% the way it should. Have you verified this behavior or are you relying on Sun's documentation?
    Yes, if it's not native font rendering, then it's indistinguishable. I've seen it with Netbeans 6.x.


    Netbeans 6.5 effectively does not have ssh/terminal support like Eclipse does. I've seen one or two plugins that integrated the java ssl library but I don't think they've been kept up to date. That's a relatively new feature Eclipse and I think it's one of those things that most developers would say is unecessary until it's a proven feature in an IDE (in this case Eclipse).

    I think it's very important and hope that a similar plugin is created for Netbeans. I wouldn't mind an X Server plugin (with an exposed API) to cover the majority of cases.
    I use it daily on Eclipse in order to edit remote files, so lack of support for something like Remote Systems Explorer is a show-stopper for me.
  28. Re: Eclipse RSE[ Go to top ]

    Frank, I have yet to prove that native font rendering on Windows is working 100% the way it should. Have you verified this behavior or are you relying on Sun's documentation?


    Yes, if it's not native font rendering, then it's indistinguishable. I've seen it with Netbeans 6.x.





    Netbeans 6.5 effectively does not have ssh/terminal support like Eclipse does. I've seen one or two plugins that integrated the java ssl library but I don't think they've been kept up to date. That's a relatively new feature Eclipse and I think it's one of those things that most developers would say is unecessary until it's a proven feature in an IDE (in this case Eclipse).

    I think it's very important and hope that a similar plugin is created for Netbeans. I wouldn't mind an X Server plugin (with an exposed API) to cover the majority of cases.


    I use it daily on Eclipse in order to edit remote files, so lack of support for something like Remote Systems Explorer is a show-stopper for me.
    Actually I did not even know eclipse now has that feature a few years back I solved this issue by simply attaching remote drives over sftp via os level tools. Even if you are on windows such tools are available (dont know the name of it though anymore)
  29. I really like NetBeans except for one thing that is a showstopper for me: the font rendering. I'm aware that this is rather a Swing issue rather than a NetBeans-specific issue, but it remains an issue.
    I once tried to use some Microsoft TT font designed for use with anti-aliasing in Visual Studio. It looked awful in NetBeans even with Java's anti-aliasing feature turned on. Java 6 update 10 uses Windows' native font rendering, so now NetBeans/Swing renders the font perfectly. I don't know if the same is true on other OS's. Give it a try!
  30. Re: NetBeans IDE 6.5 Available for Download[ Go to top ]

    Indeed, it is the most powerful open source IDE. What I want to see is visual designers for the "other stuff". Not just JSPs but also facelets, HTML,... Good job NetBeans team
  31. But what about the most powerful free IDE?[ Go to top ]

    What I want to see is visual designers for the "other stuff". Not just JSPs but also facelets, HTML,...
    You can download JDeveloper 11g (which is Free with no charge) and get your visual editing for your JSP, JSF, Swing and Facelets.
  32. What I want to see is visual designers for the "other stuff". Not just JSPs but also facelets, HTML,...

    You can download JDeveloper 11g (which is Free with no charge) and get your visual editing for your JSP, JSF, Swing and Facelets.
    I love NetBeans. I'm still hoping for wider adoption though. Eclipse is enjoys such a following out in the real world. With an ever increasing number of plugins, I don't see that rate of adoption slowing either. JDeveloper is a fantastic IDE too. The new ADF RichFaces components are really cool. I only wish that I could deploy ADF applications to another app server free-of-charge. But if I were developing entirely on an Oracle stack, JDeveloper and ADF is an awesome combination. Mike
  33. Is 6.5 compatible with 6.1? i.e. if I try 6.5, will it corrupt my project files so they can't be used in 6.1 or can I safely switch back? I must say that day to day, I was much happier with 5.5 than I am with 6.1 (I still use 5.5 at home). I scream at 6.1 daily. It may be feature rich, but it just seems to "go stupid" every now and then, plus other assorted "what is it doing now" delays, and just outright complete client crashes where it just suddenly vanishes. So I can only hope 6.5 is better, but if it's not compatible with 6.1 (as in I can use it while others stay at 6.1), it's much more difficult as I'd have to upgrade the team, plus the potential pain of rolling back. Just color me gun shy about just downloading it willy nilly.
  34. New features link[ Go to top ]

    High level: http://www.netbeans.org/community/releases/65/index.html At the bottom of the page you get a link to a low level feature by feature discussion.
  35. Weblogic support?[ Go to top ]

    Has anyone got Oracle Weblogic 10.3 to work with Netbeans 6.5. When I tried adding a weblogic 10.3 server I kept getting "Not a valid weblogic directory error......"
  36. Better code completions?[ Go to top ]

    Are there any plans on adding more context aware code completions? I mean, even Eclipse now has it (although no where on par with IDEA). I think it's very annoying to say... String result = obj. Press Ctrl-Space and get a list of everything available, as opposed to how IDEA does it with Ctrl-Shift-Space Ilya
  37. Re: Better code completions?[ Go to top ]

    Actually, I take that back, they do have some rudimentary context aware completion. When you invoke it once it gives context aware (context aware completions ordered higher), twice gives everything without order. It would be still nice to add more context aware functionality to completions as in IntelliJ.
  38. Re: Better code completions?[ Go to top ]

    Actually, I take that back, they do have some rudimentary context aware completion. When you invoke it once it gives context aware (context aware completions ordered higher), twice gives everything without order.

    It would be still nice to add more context aware functionality to completions as in IntelliJ.
    Do you have any specific suggestions as it relates to context aware? I mean, in NB you click CTRL+Space and if you are in a method you see local and class scope variables, in a class, class/module variables, etc. And in all cases you can see other things by scrolling down. Then, if you are setting a variable, the typed classes/instances you see first. You have to CTRL+SPACE (twice with space) to see classes you have not specifically imported. So, all that considered what would make that work better? What things are missing in this regard? Personally I like using one key combination for code completion versus different strokes, but still interested in the other things you are referring to...maybe some good things to file as enhancement requests :-D
  39. Debug profiles[ Go to top ]

    I am a long time user of both Netbeans and Eclipse. I haven't done a comparison between the two in a long time but one of the features that Netbeans lacks is debugger profiles - storing settings for a particular debug session such as an alias and port number. Debugger profiles allow you to connect to multiple VM's and while Netbeans is capable of this, you have to open a dialog and change settings EVERY time. There may be a workaround for this through the ant project but it would be nice if debugger profiles were first class citizens as they are in Eclipse. This is a critical feature for distributed development.
  40. JavaFX[ Go to top ]

    Not that I'm a fan of JavaFX but Netbeans 6.5 is advertised as having JavaFX capability which is simply not true. It is due in December and is not part of the 6.5 release despite what the following link says: http://www.netbeans.org/community/releases/65/index.html
  41. PHP support any good?[ Go to top ]

    (Hi everyone, my first post here on TSS). :) I'm looking forward to trying out this new version of NetBeans. NetBeans is the first IDE I started using for Java development, but I switched over to Eclipse about one and a half years ago as it was the IDE everyone at my workplace uses. Just yesterday I was assigned to take over maintenance of a small community web site, so I'm now looking for a good PHP IDE. I haven't done any PHP development in a few years, so I'm not sure which tools are best. I was considering installing some PHP Eclipse plugins, but as this new release has everything already integrated (including a debugger), I suppose I'll try this out first. Have any of you used PHP tools in Eclipse or in NetBeans? As I'm mainly a Java developer and already familiar with those IDEs, I'd prefer to stick with them, rather than getting some PHP-specific IDE, if they're capable enough for my rather basic needs.
  42. php using aptana studio for eclipse[ Go to top ]

    I don't want to diss Netbeans becuase I think they are doing alot of great things bug I have some legacy applications that I wanted to debug php and found http://www.aptana.com/php. It comes with a working php environment and javascript debugger. It also has support for many of the major Ajax libraries. It's billed as an end to end ajax environment.
  43. This is not flame bait! So please chill. I have been a Netbeans user since like eons (Forte for Java). Tried Eclipse then but Netbeans was so much easier. Recently I started developing for GWT. The netbeans (unofficial) plugin for GWT - GWT4NB - is really not upto the mark. Tried Eclipse with Cyphal Studio (an eclipse plugin for GWT) and I haven't stopped using it for my GWT development work. Netbeans has always been on the cutting edge, but somehow I have been waiting for this one (native Netbeans support for GWT) since GWT came out in 2006 :(
  44. Re: NetBeans IDE 6.5 Available for Download[ Go to top ]

    Netbeans 6.5 is a great IDE, we used to work with Ecllipse, but our organization migrated to Netbeans IDE 5 months back and we enjoyed the productivity enhancements because of it. Its web framework support is awesome, way it integrates and bundles Glassfish is just great. Because of it we are able to do so many POCs with latest technolgy. JSF support with Facelets is great. It is one of the best open source IDE, I have used in so many years. It come javascript,css intellisense. Debugger is very good. Ibuilt profiler. I dont think it is anyway less as compared to others.
  45. Netbeans look and Feel[ Go to top ]

    I don't see much issue in look and Feel of Netbeans. Just make sure you run with latest jdk1.6 build. Nimbus look and feel look great start your ide with --laf Nimbus option. Enjoy.
  46. Re: Netbeans look and Feel[ Go to top ]

    I don't see much issue in look and Feel of Netbeans.

    Just make sure you run with latest jdk1.6 build.

    Nimbus look and feel look great start your ide with --laf Nimbus option.

    Enjoy.
    Rahul, thanks for the tip on the Nimbus look-and-feel, that looks nice!
  47. Netbeans is great[ Go to top ]

    Netbeans comes with inbuilt support for JAXM, XML, XSLT etc. No other IDE has features to support JSR168 Portal 1 and Portal 2. Open Portal container is just too great to start with portals. UML support is also ok. Just needs to improve on component diagram and undo support.
  48. Netbeans is Great!![ Go to top ]

    Also Netbeans 6.5 support for J2ME is out of box, far better than any other IDE. Just see the SOA, BPEL, Web-Services, EJB, JAXB etc features. Eclipse and IDEA are now miles behind.