SpringSource Tool Suite now Free

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News: SpringSource Tool Suite now Free

  1. SpringSource Tool Suite now Free (12 messages)

    SpringSource has announced that SpringSource Tool Suite (STS) is now available for free to developers and architects. STS provides the best Eclipse-based development environment for building Spring-powered enterprise Java applications. Christian Dupuis' recent blog post includes a list of the new features in STS 2.0.2 as well as exciting additions in the STS 2.1.0.M1 release like Spring Roo support, dm Server and tc Server on Amazon EC2, and new project templates for Spring Web Flow, Spring Faces and Spring Batch. Be sure to download SpringSource Tool Suite now!
  2. Free, but no mention of open sourcing it. Interesting! how would this coexist (if at all) with the open source Spring IDE. Seems that one of these is going to be redundant soon. From the feature comparison chart it seems that there is a lot of overlap between the IDE and STS. What about the dm Server Tools?
  3. Free, but no mention of open sourcing it. Interesting! how would this coexist (if at all) with the open source Spring IDE. Seems that one of these is going to be redundant soon. From the feature comparison chart it seems that there is a lot of overlap between the IDE and STS.

    What about the dm Server Tools?
    Mrinal, STS coexists fine with Spring IDE, to the extent that it builds on and adds (quite a lot) of functionality to the base functionality provided by Spring IDE. As for the future of Spring IDE, as Christian says, "Secondly we are committed to improve and drive forward our open-source, EPL-licensed projects Spring IDE and dm Server Tools. Those two are part of STS and will continue to evolve alongside and inside STS." I'm not quite clear as to what your question is about dm Server Tools. The dm Server tools are EPL-licensed open-source, and are available and usable separately for any Eclipse environment, or for convenience, bundled as a standard part of STS. Regards, Colin SpringSource
  4. Why does SpringSource need 2 IDEs while they just started the in the IDE market? I would rather release features on the Spring IDE than creating new names, versions, hence confusing the community like Sun is doing all the times. You can have different editions ones in Java, SE, EE, ME, in the product series too instead of having too many new names, really frustated to see Java bound companies not consistent in their MANY factors. I wish SpringSource doesn't repeat the mistakes of Sun and on its Java based brands. Think Simple, Build Simple, Market Simple. People need Simple and Easy not Complex and Lost.
  5. Mansoor, It is pretty simple. There is only one SpringSource IDE, its called the SpringSource Tool Suite (STS), and it's now free. I find it helpful to think of STS as the "Eclipse IDE for Spring Developers". Just as you can get convenient Eclipse distributions from eclipse.org like the "Eclipse IDE for Java EE Developers", this distribution gives you everything you need in an IDE for developing Spring applications. When Christian and his team talk also about "Spring IDE", they mean the original open-source project founded in 2005 that created the first Eclipse-based tooling plugins for Spring. STS bundles the open source "Spring IDE" plugins, plus a lot more, as Colin mentioned. I absolutely recommend using STS if you're doing Spring development on Eclipse. It is a no brainer--your team will immediately be more productive and it'll save you from having to manage a lot of plugins yourself. Hope this helps, Keith Spring Web Flow project lead
  6. Keith Thanks for your prompt response. My request to SpringSource is to be consistent across its offing as a Java person since 1996 watching all such news/postings since then. Do you have any plans for NetBeans?
  7. colin says:
    STS coexists fine with Spring IDE
    keith says:
    It is pretty simple. There is only one SpringSource IDE, its called the SpringSource Tool Suite (STS), and it's now free.
    So, from my reading, it seems that there is an open source set of plugins for eclipse called "Spring IDE". Then there is Spring STS which builds on these plugins?? So, what does the statement "there is only one SpringSource IDE" mean then? Presumably "SpringSource IDE" == STS, not "Spring IDE"? And where does Roo fit into all of this? Andrew
  8. Andrew,
    So, from my reading, it seems that there is an open source set of plugins for eclipse called "Spring IDE". Then there is Spring STS which builds on these plugins?
    Yes. STS is the Eclipse-based IDE for Spring and Groovy/Grails developers. "Spring IDE" is the open-source Eclipse plugin for Spring, and nothing more than that. The name Spring IDE is confusing in this context, I agree! I expect Christian and his team will consider renaming Spring IDE to something like "Spring Plugin for Eclipse" to make things clearer.
    So, what does the statement "there is only one SpringSource IDE" mean then? Presumably "SpringSource IDE" == STS, not "Spring IDE"?
    Yes, SpringSource IDE == STS.
    And where does Roo fit into all of this?
    STS includes a ROO plugin that lets you launch a command-line shell inside your IDE. The shell allows you to execute auto-completing commands to do all kinds of things. For example, you can execute commands like "create project -projectName foo" to create a new Spring project from a template, or "create controller" to generate a new Spring MVC @Controller. Roo also has a neat add-on model that lets you plug-in your own commands. For example, a colleague in my office just wrote a Roo add-on that can scaffold OSGi bundles from plain JAR files. The main point is all of Roo's capabilities can be used inside STS, as well as outside of STS. Hope this helps, Keith
  9. thanks keith, makes sense to me now ;-) you guys should definitely tighten up the names though. I'd warrant that a good many people don't know the relationships between all these.
  10. I happen to be a motivated enough user to go on the side and download all your PDF data sheets, but perhaps the more casual readers would like to know 3 or 4 "killer" features of STS? Perhaps the Spring Team or any current users could tell us a few of their favorite features?
  11. Steven, Here are my top STS features, as a member of the Spring team who does lot of application development for a living: 1. Integration. STS pre-integrates plugins for Spring, Web Tools, Maven, Tomcat, and Subversion. I find these plugins essential to every new development project I undertake. STS provides me with a base Eclipse distribution that already includes them, so I do not have to integrate them myself. 2. Project jumpstart. STS provides two key features that help you jumpstart your project. First, there is the ability to create a new project from a template. The Spring team has contributed pre-built templates for common project types, such as a new Spring MVC project, and new templates can also be contributed by the community. Second, there is now integration with a command-line shell called "Roo" that enables you to script project creation and other code generation commands. 3. Many Spring goodies. STS includes the Spring IDE plugin, but also goes further. First, it discovers and subsequently manages my Spring configuration files, so I rarely have to manage them manually. Second, it knows about the Spring configuration namespaces, so I do not have to worry with enabling those myself. Third, it provides useful views for visualizing application configuration, including the URL mappings of my Spring MVC-based web applications. Fourth, it has awareness of Spring usage best practices and will flag a warning if I violate one of them. For example, STS will warn me if I configure a non-pooling DataSource for use in production. 4. Very active, community-focused development team. If you have been following the SpringSource blog, you will see that Christian and his team are very active moving STS forward, and they listen to their community. The bottom line is I have come to trust and expect that his team will provide the best Eclipse-based IDE for Spring and Groovy/Grails development going forward. So as a Spring developer that uses Eclipse, I absolutely start with STS as my base Eclipse distribution, and go from there. I also do what I can to help improve the IDE for the benefit of the community, and I've found Christian's team to be very responsive to that. Specifically, I regularly open JIRAs to request new features I believe will add value and I also manage the project templates STS provides for new Spring MVC, Spring Web Flow, and Spring Faces (JSF) projects. I do this not just as a SpringSource founder, but as a part of the Spring community, and others are empowered to do the same. Those are just some of the things that resonate in STS with me! Keith Spring Web Flow project lead
  12. First congratulation for Spring, they are doing great work keeping the Java ecosystem interesting. But I have several questions or requests... 1. I went through the data-sheet and features documents, and there is no mention of Groovy and Grails, so what is the plan for that? 2. What does the term Free commercial license mean? 3. Why doesn't Spring elaborate more in blogs or webinars about their Business model and revenue streams so people (us) stop bugging them about not being free enough? We sell X for Z, we sold that many Xs, if we license X under G we won't make any Z! ... Simple!
  13. 1. I went through the data-sheet and features documents, and there is no mention of Groovy and Grails, so what is the plan for that?
    We're just getting started in earnest on improving the tool support in STS for groovy and grails - and have some great initial progress with a joint incremental compiler for groovy and Java based on the JDT working inside of Eclipse. This is an area you can expect to see rapid progress on in STS over the coming months. Anyone with feature requests in these areas, please send them to us!
    2. What does the term Free commercial license mean?
    STS is free to use (you don't pay anything) but it is not open source (though many of its constituent parts we also make available through open source). The license restricts you from redistributing or selling STS to a third-party for example. -- Adrian Colyer, CTO SpringSource