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News: WebSphere sMash V1.1.1 released

  1. WebSphere sMash V1.1.1 released (3 messages)

    WebSphere sMash is IBM's lightweight platform for the creation of modern web applications based on Web 2.0 principals and dynamic scripting languages (Groovy & PHP). V1.1.1 of the sMash platform adds OS support for AIX, pSeries Linux, and zSeries Linux. In addition to OS support, sMash V1.1.1 has been made available on new deployment infrastructures, including the public cloud through Amazon EC2, and through IBM's Smart Market & Smart Cube appliance, a new way for developers and ISVs to sell their applications directly to end users through a marketplace & pre-integrated appliance. WebSphere sMash V1.1.1 delivers substantial runtime performance improvements for PHP, and significant community-supported innnovations such as an enhanced iWidget editor for Application Builder (sMash's web-based IDE), and delivery of IBM's Application Creator for Business Users. IBM's Application Creator for Business Users is a new, lightweight, web-based technology developed by IBM Research that's designed to help business users, business analysts, and developers reduce the development time and effort for simple applications. Addressing feedback from our clients, partners, and our developer community (even comments on TheServerSide), we've also simplified our licensing terms & conditions. Now sMash V1.1.1 allows development on any hardware we support, with as many copies needed, for no-charge. Even usage on the Amazon EC2 cloud for development usage is no-charge from IBM. The commercial version of sMash continues to be available for production usage. Download V1.1.1 today from Project Zero, our community for incubation of the technology. You can also follow us (the development team) on twitter to get the latest late breaking updates on the offering. We'd love to hear any comments you have via our Project Zero forums or as comments to this post!

    Threaded Messages (3)

  2. 2 cents...[ Go to top ]

    You're kidding right? From those who brought us WAS 5 and 6 and all the performance bottlenecks they contain, we're to believe this new tool is the future? What are Web 2.0 principles anyway? Is that like the old multimedia levels from the early 90s? :) Seriously, IBM Websphere and lightweight have never been used in the same sentence. What's different?
  3. Brand vs. product[ Go to top ]

    Seriously, IBM Websphere and lightweight have never been used in the same sentence. What's different?
    WebSphere is a brand. Don't associate it to WebSphere Application Server - the product. If WAS has performance problems, it doesn't automatically mean sMash too will have them. WebSphere sMash needs no IDE, uses dynamic languages, requires no separate container (actually container is bundled with the application)... hence lighweight.
  4. Re: 2 cents...[ Go to top ]

    Hi Leif,
    You're kidding right? From those who brought us WAS 5 and 6 and all the performance bottlenecks they contain, we're to believe this new tool is the future?
    IBM isn't bidding sMash as a replacement for WAS, it instead targets a different use-case: web apps based on RESTful patterns. Apps that are simple and target situational needs, vs. apps that handle transactional needs and more suited for App Server technologies. With sMash, scripts replace code, config, and deployment info.
    What are Web 2.0 principles anyway?
    Web 1.0 was designed for sharing and browsing hyper-linked documents. However, Web 1.0 was never meant for real applications and is limited by the click, wait and HTML page refresh interaction model. Web 2.0 technologies address many shortcomings of the Web 1.0 model, but brings a set of development challenges to the table that didn't exist before (such as needs for new skills around client side programming). sMash brings an integrated client side and server side solution to address the needs of the Web 2.0 developer. For example, on the client side we seamlessly embed and extend the capabilities of the Dojo Toolkit to enable the developer to create a rich user interface from a standard web browser. sMash also supports newer architectures & protocols, such as Ajax, Atom and JSON. On the server side, sMash follows an 'application is the server' model which enables a level of agility that is not present with std Java development. You create the app, and you run the app. There's no packaging or deploying an app to a server. Take a look at this site the sMash team created for more info.
    Seriously, IBM Websphere and lightweight have never been used in the same sentence. What's different?
    For this answer Chintan's reply directly above covers it! Will also add that the download of sMash off the projectzero.org website is 2.5MB. A full/complete install of the product, including the JDK, will need approx. 275MB of disk space + an varying amt for each app. It consumes a minimal amount of memory (for example sMash had been run on a legacy desktop with 512MB of memory). Perhaps you should download it and give it a try .. it's a dramatically different experience from that which you'd get from std app server environments.