Oracle Announces support for Eclipse 3.5

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News: Oracle Announces support for Eclipse 3.5

  1. Oracle Announces support for Eclipse 3.5 (10 messages)

    Significant new features in this release are: * Support for Eclipse 3.4 and 3.5 * Support for generation of JAX-WS webservices from Spring Beans * JAX-WS Webservice bindings editor provides a graphical UI for defining bindings, async mappings, and hander chains. * Deployment descriptor editor for weblogic-ejb-jar.xml allows visual editing and validation of EJBs for deployment on WebLogic Server * JSR 88 deployment plan editor simplifies the creation and management of deployment plans on WebLogic Server * Enhancements to Oracle DTP plug-ins make working with Oracle – specific database features easy in Eclipse. The Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse is availablethrough Eclipse Software Updates and for free download from: http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/enterprise-pack-for-eclipse
  2. Oracle Announces support for NetBeans 6.7?
  3. Oracle Announces support for NetBeans 6.7?
    I'd love to know if and when that announcement will come. As a NetBeans user, I'm hoping they endorse it but it would seem hard to believe Oracle's going to put their weight behind 3 different IDEs. Mike
  4. Oracle Announces support for NetBeans 6.7?


    I'd love to know if and when that announcement will come. As a NetBeans user, I'm hoping they endorse it but it would seem hard to believe Oracle's going to put their weight behind 3 different IDEs.

    Mike
    I'm totally bias, there's no point supporting 3 different IDE's. I hope oracle just sticks with eclipse and dumps the rest. peter
  5. Hi Peter, Usually I agree with your posts, but really enjoy having NetBeans as an option. Do you think just having Eclipse as the only open source IDE is a good idea? Look at what happened to JBoss JEE server, GlassFish raised the bar while IMHO, Jboss slacked off. Our culture is based on competition, without it we have socialistic quality of services. My view, Eclipse already is suffering with this, NetBeans is a great choice! So, why do you work on a rules engine when Drools is the choice? Cheers
  6. Hi Peter,

    Usually I agree with your posts, but really enjoy having NetBeans as an option. Do you think just having Eclipse as the only open source IDE is a good idea?

    Look at what happened to JBoss JEE server, GlassFish raised the bar while IMHO, Jboss slacked off.

    Our culture is based on competition, without it we have socialistic quality of services. My view, Eclipse already is suffering with this, NetBeans is a great choice!

    So, why do you work on a rules engine when Drools is the choice?

    Cheers
    Oracle would be absolutely foolish to dump Netbeans. Consider that, as the owner of Java, they absolutely need to control the IDE. When the next version of Java comes out, do you really think it makes sense to wait at least a couple of months for Eclipse to start supporting it, or do you want to give developers the tools to start developing against it immediately? I know what I would do. What's more likely is that Oracle will either dump JDeveloper, or start merging JDeveloper and Netbeans and possibly rebranding Netbeans as JDeveloper and adding JDeveloper features to Netbeans. It's the same reason why Oracle won't dump OpenSolaris. It's far better to control your own technology and add value to it vis-a-vis your competitors unless you're so far behind that you have no choice but to use a standard technology. That's why pre-Sun Oracle supported Linux and Eclipse.
  7. Hi Peter,

    Usually I agree with your posts, but really enjoy having NetBeans as an option. Do you think just having Eclipse as the only open source IDE is a good idea?

    Look at what happened to JBoss JEE server, GlassFish raised the bar while IMHO, Jboss slacked off.

    Our culture is based on competition, without it we have socialistic quality of services. My view, Eclipse already is suffering with this, NetBeans is a great choice!

    So, why do you work on a rules engine when Drools is the choice?

    Cheers
    I have to admit, my own bias is due to a bad experience with older versions of netbeans. The last time I used it was almost 2 years back and it still felt sluggish compared to eclipse. For example, the class diagram functionality in older netbeans chokes hard on large models and can't export a png. The look and feel of swing is still ugly to me, even though I've used it extensively in JMeter. You bring up a good question. Why do I work on my own rule engine? The answer to that is simple, for fun. No one should get the wrong impression Jamocha is meant to be a commercial product. Jamocha is a research playground for me and I do it to push rule technology forward. Some open source projects want world domination or something grandiose. From a technical perspective, I prefer eclipse plugin design over netbeans. I also like the look and feel of SWT over Swing. I agree that competition is good, but from a business perspective funding 3 different IDE's is not smart business. It's better to let netbeans go free and give it freedom to evolve and grow on its own. I'm sure people will disagree. My opinion is just an opinion and really has no real weight. peter
  8. Hi Peter,

    Usually I agree with your posts, but really enjoy having NetBeans as an option. Do you think just having Eclipse as the only open source IDE is a good idea?

    Look at what happened to JBoss JEE server, GlassFish raised the bar while IMHO, Jboss slacked off.

    Our culture is based on competition, without it we have socialistic quality of services. My view, Eclipse already is suffering with this, NetBeans is a great choice!

    So, why do you work on a rules engine when Drools is the choice?

    Cheers
    For the record, "drools is the choice" isn't true. The bulk of the rule consulting work out there is for iLog JRules and Fico Blaze (formerly FairIssac). There's still a huge population of developers who use CLIPS and JESS, so any assertion that drools is the preferred solution is marketing, not reality. The last time I checked, blaze and jrules had gross revenue over 100 million from consulting based on their public filing with the SEC. Aside from blaze and jrules, quickrules was bought by SAP and Haley enterprise was bought by Oracle. Both of them have a steady revenue, so there's plenty of evidence there's more than 1 choice :) peter
  9. from the summary page...
    becoming the first enterprise vendor to release a commercial Eclipse product atop the Eclipse 3.5 Galileo release.

    Is this really correct? Seems like lots of companies have released products on Eclipse 3.5... Instantiations comes to mind, and I know I've seen others...
  10. from the summary page...
    becoming the first enterprise vendor to release a commercial Eclipse product atop the Eclipse 3.5 Galileo release.

    Is this really correct? Seems like lots of companies have released products on Eclipse 3.5.. Instantiations comes to mind, and I know I've seen others...
    I guess it depends on your definition of: first enterprise vendor release commerical product atop :)
  11. I guess it depends on your definition of:
    first
    enterprise
    vendor
    release
    commerical
    product
    atop
    Please, this is supposed to be a happy occasion! Let's not bicker and argue about who shipped what .. ;-) Peace, Cameron Purdy | Oracle Coherence http://coherence.oracle.com/