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News: IBM WASV7 Java Persistence API (JPA) 2.0 Open Alpha

  1. Object-relational persistence is a key developer requirement for many application developer scenarios. JPA is the Java EE standard for object-relational persistence and was first introduced as part of Java EE 5. As part of the Java EE 6 standards, JPA 2.0 (JSR-317) updates object-relational capabilities with important developer APIs and enhancements. Key additions in JPA 2.0 include: Significant programmer productivity improvements Innovative APIs from Open Source (standardized) Extended query language The WebSphere Application Server JPA implementation is based on Apache OpenJPA, a leading open source Java persistence framework. This alpha provides the Apache OpenJPA 2.0 implementation with IBM enhancements to benefit integration with WebSphere Application Server. The Apache OpenJPA 2.0 implementation includes improvements and benefits over previous releases and even beyond the JPA 2.0 specification. Highlights of the JPA 2.0 implementation delivered in the alpha: Proposed Final Specification Draft #2 compliant implementation Standards based APIs from open source Significant programmer productivity improvements Query language (JPQL) extensions and improvements High performance implementation Programmatic control of database access optimizations Fetch groups, fetch plans, access intents Learn More Overview Education Download
  2. Isn't IBM 'supposed' to wait a couple of years before starting to implement a new Java specification?
  3. Change happens[ Go to top ]

    Isn't IBM 'supposed' to wait a couple of years before starting to implement a new Java specification?
    Change happens, sometimes. Isn't that a good thing?
  4. Isn't IBM 'supposed' to wait a couple of years before starting to implement a new Java specification?
    If you have nothing to say, say nothing.
  5. Isn't IBM 'supposed' to wait a couple of years before starting to implement a new Java specification?

    If you have nothing to say, say nothing.
    I do agree that I sounded more than a little sarcastic, but it's not really my intend to be rude in any way. At the very least you could see my remark as simply noticing the fact that IBM, which used to focus on stable implementations some time after a spec is released, is now maybe reconsidering its strategies by releasing an (alpha) implementation of something even ahead of the spec. Of course, this is an highly welcome and interesting change. My apologies if anyone took offense of my comment.
  6. I wonder why everyone on this list hates IBM so much. Here's just another front page story with lots of anti IBM comments: http://www.theserverside.com/news/thread.tss?thread_id=58363 I remember a looonnnggg time ago I was evaluating app servers and I was very disappointed by the slow startup time and resource-hungryness of WebSphere and WebLogic, especially compared to Orion (RIP). Back then the WebSphere IDEs were as slow as hell too. Have things improved at all in the past 3-4 years?
  7. IBM is deeply involved[ Go to top ]

    IBM is deeply involved in and is committed to the open source community. An alpha is a way to allow users of products to get into it early and provides an opportunity for people to contribute (whether with code or comments) before the product is finalized. This completely in the open-source spirit. When the final release comes, it will not only have been through the scrutiny of developers but also have been vetted by end-users. IBM has a big megaphone and this announcement will result in a robust round of contribution, which must ultimately improve the final product.