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News: The OpenSolaris Governing Board Collectively Resigns

  1. Maybe Oracle didn't think OpenSolaris was worth their time and resources in that it wasn't being run "correctly", or it could be a classic "impedance mismatch" case where open source doesn't match up well with "big corp" in translating open collaborative efforts into high profit margins.

    "An end has come to a major part of Sun Microsystems' attempt to transform Solaris from a proprietary version of Unix to an open-source operating system built by others, too."

    At least now there is a clear case study and scenario reference on how an open source project initiative can fall apart.

    "Be it Resolved that the OpenSolaris Governing Board hereby collectively resigns, noting that under the terms of the OpenSolaris Charter section 1.1 (and Constitution 1.3.5) the responsibility to appoint an OGB passes to Oracle. "

    Check out the details here: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-20014478-264.html?tag=cnetRiver



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    Threaded Messages (3)

  2. How does Oracle lose here?[ Go to top ]

    I'm not clear on why Oracle does NOT consider this a win. They get control of OpenSolaris, where they can guarantee it languishes and dies; from their perspective, I'd think that was a victory for them.

    In fact, I'm not actually clear on what the board thought they'd accomplish by this at all.

    It seems like this: "We're a separate entity, which Oracle doesn't like. So Oracle is hamstringing us. In retaliation, we're going to give Oracle exactly what it wants. That'll show them!"

    Maybe I'm just missing some nuance here.

  3. In retaliation, we're going to give Oracle exactly what it wants. That'll show them!"

    Maybe I'm just missing some nuance here.

    Maybe it wasn't an act of retaliation, but of desperation? Fighting Oracle might have proven to be a fight they could not win, or did not wish to fight.

  4. How does Oracle lose here?[ Go to top ]

    In retaliation, we're going to give Oracle exactly what it wants. That'll show them!"

    Maybe I'm just missing some nuance here.

    Maybe it wasn't an act of retaliation, but of desperation? Fighting Oracle might have proven to be a fight they could not win, or did not wish to fight.

     

    I concur.  Oracle already made up its mind and was just hoping that this "OpenSolaris thing" would somehow disappear if they ignored it.  They want to focus on how to turn good Sun tech into some good money making strategies, rather than maintaining an open fun house of sorts for curious, pony tailed developers.

    Solaris is where the money is, and it didn't seem as if OpenSolaris was picking up any great traction in the open-source space anyway.  The latter statement is a slight rehash of what this article said: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-20013687-264.html?tag=mncol;txt

    So basically, we know for sure that Oracle doesn't want at least one open-source product which it got from Sun.

    Is it possible for a company to please both its investors and its software developer community (particluarly the open-source development community) without stepping on some toes?  We know that Sun tried it and seemed to end up stepping on a lot of investors' toes:)