Introduction to Strong Cryptography

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News: Introduction to Strong Cryptography

  1. Introduction to Strong Cryptography (4 messages)

    One thing that amazes me is that the most developers are not familiar with strong cryptography. In my career, I’ve seen all sort of mistakes that lead to leaked data, guessable passwords, unfortunate disclosures, and worse. The nice thing is, you don’t have to understand the ridiculously complex math behind the algorithms, you only have to know the rules for using them correctly. By the end of this series, my goal is to de-mystify the magic, so you can start using the primitives in your code right away!

    But first, when I say Strong Cryptography, what the hell am I referring to anyway?

    Strong cryptography or cryptographically strong are general terms applied cryptographic systems or components that are considered highly resistant to cryptanalysis.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strong_cryptography

    So Strong Cryptography is not some esoteric concept you are not privy to: Strong Cryptography is simply a set of definitions and algorithms that have been reviewed by experts, secret government agencies, and third-party organizations and found to be hard to break.

    One thing I’ve seen repeatedly done is that developer ‘invents’ a cryptography scheme for a particular purpose. Here’s the thing, cryptography is thousands of years old. If you’ve ever ‘invented’ your own way to ‘encrypt’ data, chances are you’ve just re-invented something that has been discovered thousandsof years ago. If you want to avoid the mistakes that WEP made with wireless, Microsoft did with the XBox, or Sony made with the PS3, this blog series should help you avoid embarrassment, AND give you something impressive to say at the next cocktail party.

    Finally, I just wanted to mention this is actually a very personal subject that I have a long history with. I found my first need for cryptography was passing notes to my friends as we played “Spies” in the neighborhood and needed to keep the locations of our secret forts safe. Unfortunately, my single letter substitution cipher must have been broken by some whiz kid as our treehouse was destroyed that summer… After reading Alvin’s Secret Code, we then created 2-3 sets of Caesar wheels and never lost a secret fort again!

    Read the rest of the article at the following URL:

    Java Code Geeks: Introduction to Strong Cryptography

    Also check out some Java based cryptography examples.

    Threaded Messages (4)

  2. You are right about not many developers know about this stuff. but partly it is the documentation to blame. There no proper resource to get started on crypto. Java documentation has always been aweful. Lack of examples and the fact that its not needed on a day to day basis also make it the least popular subject. Good write up .. thanks
  3. Good introductory book[ Go to top ]

    I found Cryptography Decrypted to be a great book.  I recommend it to developers all the time.  You can read a few sample chapters at the link.

  4. Another great book[ Go to top ]

    When I were taking my first steps in crytography i read this book and it really helpt.

    http://mylifewithjava.blogspot.com/2010/11/short-introduction-to-cryptography_21.html

  5. "NTRU is a public key cryptosystem that is considered unbreakable even with quantum computers. Commonly used cryptosystems like RSA or ECC, on the other hand, will be broken if and when quantum computers become available."-http://ntru.sourceforge.net/

     

    "A command line interface for encryption and decryption using the NTRU cryptography algorithm."-https://code.google.com/p/ntrutil/