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News: Buying into Trouble: A Case study about Oracle's Sales Cycle

  1. "It is a scene repeated countless times in the corporate jungle: A company endures months of sales pitches, pays millions of dollars for new software, discovers massive problems, and spends far more to fix the product than the original cost of buying it." A new CNet story highlights the dark side of corporate sales cycle, with case study on Oracle.

    After watching Ellison promote Oracle 9i App Server at JavaOne as if its the Second Coming, I am not suppised at all with the following story in cnet. Perhaps most large-scale corporate sales machines behave like this, but it does seems like Oracle is a leader of the pack:

    Read Buying into Trouble

  2. A very good series of articles. And very illustrative of what companies go through in working with various software vendors. The examples with Oracle are perfect. While I don't completely ignore what the evangelists and marketing people say from a company, I generally assume that a significant portion of their technical information is wrong or mis-represented. A cynical position, but a required one, I have found. It is often quite difficult to make a true value judgement on the software under consideration and everytime we help customers purchase an app server or database, we keep a record of what was right in the literature and what was, ummmmm, misrepresented for future reference. It helps when we have to deal with the various vendors again, say with new product releases...

  3. It is often quite difficult to make a true value judgement on the software under consideration and everytime we help customers purchase an app server or database, we keep a record of what was right in the literature and what was, ummmmm, misrepresented for future reference.


    Would you publish your findings? ;-)



  4. We thought about it at one time - our lawyer suggested otherwise...
  5. Anyone who has followed Larry Ellison would see this as a logical extension of his personality.

    What amazes me is that companies will commit tens of millions of dollars to software based on the pitch of a salesman. This is really inexcusable. These executives should be held accountable by thier companies for these blunders. The expertise to "look under the hood" is out there and can be hired.
  6. I wonder when Oracles Application Server (j2ee) is based on the Orion App. Server , why not use the original Orion Software and avoid the annoying phone calls from Oracle Sales Rep. people.
    We downloaded only trial version and they bothered me for about four weeks.

    Frank
  7. I always, ALWAYS give a fake phone number in situations like that - nothing more annoying than drooling, commisioned sales chumps when trying to get work done. Besides if I have questions other than "Okay - how much is this mess going to cost us?" there's no way I would want a sales person involved with getting the answer - for instance with something technical.
  8. This is "business as usual" for ORCL.

    Oracle are a marketing machine where market share comes first and technology (read product) comes second.

    If anybody doubts this, simply read the history of how a "superior" database technology from Ingres lives in relative CA-obscurity, while a so so RDMBS enjoys market leadership. And so as not to pick on ORCL, just look at what happened to CP/M.

    The facts are these: a great product may or may not make it. A great marketing campaign will make it.