If chief security officers are worried about the proliferation of the bring your own device (BYOD) trend, they should be hysterical over the inevitable data breaches that will occur as a result of employees bringing their own cloud computing software into the workplace.

"When we talk about consumer cloud services like Dropbox, we find people bringing them in and inadvertently creating security holes," said Matt RichardsownCloud vice president of products, when interviewed at the 2013 Red Hat Summit. "The result is potentially sensitive data sitting out in the cloud beyond the control of IT."

"When we talk about consumer cloud services like Dropbox, we find people bringing them in and inadvertently creating security holes."

Matt Richards,
ownCloud

Of course, the big problem is that many of these consumer cloud services are so good, so easy to use, so convenient and so much a part of modern day home computing that employees who use these products at work are oblivious to the security threat they create. Simply banning tools like Dropbox or Google Drive won't work, as employees will end up looking for alternatives or skirting the company's rules of governance. Instead, organizations need to provide complementary alternatives that offer the same functionality but allows for internal IT control over access and provisioning.

Read the full article, and watch the interview with ownCloud's Matt Richards