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News: TSS Vlog: Greg Wilkins talks about Jetty

  1. TSS Vlog: Greg Wilkins talks about Jetty (13 messages)

    Interview with Greg Wilkins at JavaOne 2007 about his work on Jetty. Jetty is an open-source, small-footprint web server component and servlet container used for applications ranging from embedded systems to clustered enterprise applications. Greg tells us about Jetty's performance characteristics when compared against Tomcat and other containers, who is using it, and current work for session clustering using Terracotta. Learn about Jetty as the nimble, embedded, small alternative to bloated servlet containers. Watch other Tech Briefs

    Threaded Messages (13)

  2. Bloated servlet containers?[ Go to top ]

    What are the other "bloated" Servlet containers and how big actually are they? I am familiar with Tomcat and comapared to most other similar products (i.e. application servers) it is pretty slim. (6.1 MB zipped)
  3. Re: Bloated servlet containers?[ Go to top ]

    What are the other "bloated" Servlet containers and how big actually are they?

    I am familiar with Tomcat and comapared to most other similar products (i.e. application servers) it is pretty slim.
    (6.1 MB zipped)
    He probably meant the j2ee irons, but I personally think the comparison is quite unfair, because Jetty and Tomcat are pure servlet runners which provide servlets and jsp as well as some basic authentication mechanisms, j2ee servers provide much more, and the slimmest of those servers compare quite well in size and startup overhead if you count in the additional functionality they provide.
  4. Tomcat is slimmer than Jetty...[ Go to top ]

    ... in almost any metric you measure. Look at the download sizes (6.1MB for Tomcat 6.0.13, 17MB for Jetty 6.1.3). Look at the out-of-the-box memory footprint, or number of classes loaded into the JVM. Look at the minimal configuration file sizes, where the two are just about the same. People who think Tomcat is bloated probably haven't looked at it for a couple of years.
  5. ... in almost any metric you measure. Look at the download sizes (6.1MB for Tomcat 6.0.13, 17MB for Jetty 6.1.3). Look at the out-of-the-box memory footprint, or number of classes loaded into the JVM. Look at the minimal configuration file sizes, where the two are just about the same. People who think Tomcat is bloated probably haven't looked at it for a couple of years.
    One thing has to be added, jetty used to be somehwat faster than Tomcat, but with Tomcat 6 this is probably not true anymore. At least this is my subjective impression on the issue, real benchmarks would be interesting, although quite academic because both servlet runners are very fast. I personally think comparing Tomcat and Jetty is like comparing one blend of good coffee with another blend of good coffee, tastes vary but in the end it is just coffee.
  6. coffee and cappuccino[ Go to top ]

    Not quite - or at least my experience with both containers hasn't produced the same results. There's a very simple reason why a lot of people like Jetty. It lets you do something like this: java -cp lib/start.jar:lib/jetty.jar org.mortbay.start.Start conf/jetty.xml So really comparing using both of them is like making a cup of coffee vs. a cup of cappuccino. Or....maybe more like making a traditional slow drip whole pot of coffee vs. using one of those insta single cup machines where you just press a button and have a fresh cup of coffee without thinking about it.
    ...I personally think comparing Tomcat and Jetty is like comparing one blend of good coffee with another blend of good coffee, tastes vary but in the end it is just coffee.
  7. ... in almost any metric you measure. Look at the download sizes (6.1MB for Tomcat 6.0.13, 17MB for Jetty 6.1.3). Look at the out-of-the-box memory footprint, or number of classes loaded into the JVM. Look at the minimal configuration file sizes, where the two are just about the same. People who think Tomcat is bloated probably haven't looked at it for a couple of years.
    People who have looked at Tomcat code and Jetty code would disagree. Your statistics are blatantly misleading. Nonetheless, they are each good servlet containers, when used in the areas that they are intended for. Peace, Cameron Purdy Tangosol Coherence: The Java Data Grid
  8. I've looked at both...[ Go to top ]

    ... and obviously I don't disagree with myself ;) I'm not saying Jetty is bad in any way. It's perfectly fine. I was just saying many people continue to use various outdated metrics in calling Tomcat bloated. Also, Cameron, I wasn't stating any "statistics" or other subjective / interpreted metrics. Just plain facts.
  9. Re: I've looked at both...[ Go to top ]

    ... and obviously I don't disagree with myself
    It's a boring world if we were to all agree. That's why I enjoy arguing with myself. The Jetty code seemed to me to be the bare minimum in most cases to do what it was doing. Tomcat seemed to me to have many, many ways of doing the same thing. I haven't looked in 6+ months at either, but unless Tomcat went on a fad diet .. Peace, Cameron Purdy Tangosol Coherence: The Java Data Grid
  10. Greetings. I'm not talking about the download, but the actual size of the servlet container. Given Jetty's modularity, you can get the whole thing to run in less than 2 MB RAM (and some times considerable less) and off a .jar file of 250 KB or so. That's what makes Jetty so attractive for embedded applications. If you strip the extra XML handling and configurator, and write instead a Java-based launcher that calls the Jetty service initializers, you can have an awesome HTTP 1.1/servlet server in less than 0.5 MB. Cheers, E Register for TSSJS/Barcelona
  11. Given Jetty's modularity, you can get the whole thing to run in less than 2 MB RAM (and some times considerable less) and off a .jar file of 250 KB or so.
    2MB or 20MB, how often will this affect the bottom line of an IT project?
  12. 2MB or 20MB, how often will this affect the bottom line of an IT project?
    More often than you think. There are a number of devices that require an embedded server with servlet capabilities, like in industrial robotics (yes, Java lives there as well). I know of at least two different projects that have embedded HTTP/servlet containers and use Jetty as the engine. Such machines must make efficient use of resources, be secondary storage (usually in solid state) or RAM. As more devices become web-enabled from toys to medical equipment, embedded servers will become more pervasive. Cheers, E
  13. Given Jetty's modularity, you can get the whole thing to run in less than 2 MB RAM (and some times considerable less) and off a .jar file of 250 KB or so. That's what makes Jetty so attractive for embedded applications. If you strip the extra XML handling and configurator, and write instead a Java-based launcher that calls the Jetty service initializers, you can have an awesome HTTP 1.1/servlet server in less than 0.5 MB.

    Cheers,

    E
    Register for TSSJS/Barcelona
    +1 Jetty is awesome. Last time I checked, Tomcat's "embedded" version was a bad joke. That was in T6, granted but I have hard time believing Tomcat team was able to fix it so fast. Would be very uncharacteristic of 'em :)
  14. That was in T6
    Sorry, I meant - Tomcat 5 (Why can't people edit their own posts on TSS? SO ANNOYING)