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News: Stripes 1.5 released

  1. Stripes 1.5 released (30 messages)

    Stripes 1.5 is available for immediate download. Stripes is a presentation framework for building web applications using the latest Java technologies. Some of the major enhancements and bug fixes include:
    • Even less configuration! Stripes can automatically locate and use your extensions (TypeConverter, Formatter, ExceptionHandler, ActionBeanContext, etc.). Most applications can now be configured with just two parameters.
    • Request parameters can be embedded in the request URL and used just like normal parameters. Clean URLs are fully supported by s:link, s:url, and s:form. Use the new DynamicMappingFilter for even more flexibility.
    • @StrictBinding annotation to restrict binding only to those properties you wish to allow.
    • @Validate(encrypted=true) to encrypt ActionBean property values before they are written to a page in a link or form input.
    • @DontBind annotation to completely bypass both binding and validation for an event.
    • AJAX-friendly features like partial forms and @HttpCache annotation to control client-side caching.
    • The s:format tag brings the power of Stripes formatters to your views. Formatters are also used by all tags and resolutions, leaving String.valueOf() as a last resort for converting objects to strings.
    There are many more. For more information see the announcement on the Stripes web site. During the development of Stripes 1.5, Fred Daoud worked closely with the development team while authoring his excellent new book about Stripes, now available as a beta book from the Pragmatic Programmers. Enjoy.

    Threaded Messages (30)

  2. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    From the "maybe we should call it Cold Dead Fish" Department. I tell ya, these guys can't market their way out of a wet paper sack. Let's reword this a little. From their reclusive bunker at Stripes World Headquarters, Tim Fennell and his Council Of Them, after a tumultuous development period measured in Ages, has Gifted Upon The People the glistening Gem that is Stripes 1.5. Behold. Hail Tim and Them! What wonders are contained within this Gift?
  3. Even less configuration! Stripes can automatically locate and use your extensions (TypeConverter, Formatter, ExceptionHandler, ActionBeanContext, etc.). Most applications can now be configured with just two parameters.
  4. Stripes is now omniscient, and borderline sentient in terms of it intuiting your deepest desires.
  5. Request parameters can be embedded in the request URL and used just like normal parameters. Clean URLs are fully supported by s:link, s:url, and s:form. Use the new DynamicMappingFilter for even more flexibility.
  6. With DMF, you may now Lord over your own domain, as you've always wanted to, and treat requests like putty in your hands. You now can be King in your Kingdom, much like Tim and Them are upon the Earth.
  7. @StrictBinding annotation to restrict binding only to those properties you wish to allow.
  8. All properties are created equal, but some properties are more equal than others. As it should be.
  9. @Validate(encrypted=true) to encrypt ActionBean property values before they are written to a page in a link or form input.
  10. When you're in a position such as Tim and The Council, secrets are a way of life. Now you too can keep secrets.
  11. @DontBind annotation to completely bypass both binding and validation for an event.
  12. More control. More power. Control. Power. mmm...Power...
  13. AJAX-friendly features like partial forms and @HttpCache annotation to control client-side caching.
  14. Not just control over your little slice of silicon heaven, but control others as well! This is all part of The Plan. Embrace it.
  15. The s:format tag brings the power of Stripes formatters to your views. Formatters are also used by all tags and resolutions, leaving String.valueOf() as a last resort for converting objects to strings.
  16. No longer cede to others what you can rule yourself. With your own formatters, you can make lies out of truths, and truths out of lies -- to better promote your agenda.
    During the development of Stripes 1.5, Fred Daoud worked closely with the development team while authoring his excellent new book about Stripes, now available as a beta book from the Pragmatic Programmers.
    Fred has been colluding with the Council and The Tim to bring this important indoctrination material to The People so they may be well versed in The Way. 1.5 is upon us! Rejoice! Download and propagate The Message of What is To Be in the world of Action Framework. Hail the Tim! Hail Them!
  17. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    Lol Will! Whatever you're drinking - can I have some? -t
  18. ...[ Go to top ]

    From the "maybe we should call it Cold Dead Fish" Department.

    Hail the Tim! Hail Them!
    Uhh ... wow, Cartman. That is one sick post, dude! Anyway ... how would the original poster compare Stripes with Wicket, which happens to be on the same page of topics today? We have a plethora of frameworks to choose from, and also an excessive number of them ;-) Seriously, what do you think are the advantages and disadvantages of each framework?
  19. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    compare Stripes with Wicket, which happens to be on the same page of topics today? We have a plethora of frameworks to choose from, and also an excessive number of them ;-)

    Seriously, what do you think are the advantages and disadvantages of each framework?
    Stripes and Wicket are both excellent frameworks, IMO. They both aim to reduce XML configuration to a minimum, and obviously both aim to make web development more enjoyable. While neither is full-stack, they both have easy integration of Spring and Hibernate. There are some significant differences, though:
    • Stripes is action-based; Wicket is component-based.
    • Stripes embraces the request-response nature of HTTP; Wicket aims to make web development more like desktop application development.
    • Stripes is probably easier to learn if you come from a Struts background; Wicket is probably easier if you come from a Swing background.
    • The code base for Stripes is much smaller than that of Wicket.
    • With Stripes you use your favorite AJAX framework; Wicket has built-in AJAX support.
    I could go on, but the point is to notice that I'm not implying that one approach is better than the other. The reason is that only you can decide which approach is better for your needs and requirements. Cheers, Freddy
  20. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    Freddy, would that make you "Freddy the Baptist", the one who prepares the world so that we may better receive the message of "Tim and Them"?
  21. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    I could go on, but the point is to notice that I'm not implying that one approach is better than the other. The reason is that only you can decide which approach is better for your needs and requirements.y
    Agreed. And nothing beats giving both frameworks a try yourself. :-)
  22. couldn't agree more[ Go to top ]

    Like Freddy and Eelco have said- pick the right tool for the job. For action oriented framework- stripes is tops. For component style, wicket leads the pack, and if you want true RIA use flex if you afford the runtime requirement of flash player (like a lot of in house bus apps) J
  23. Re: couldn't agree more[ Go to top ]

    Like Freddy and Eelco have said- pick the right tool for the job. For action oriented framework- stripes is tops. For component style, wicket leads the pack, and if you want true RIA use flex if you afford the runtime requirement of flash player (like a lot of in house bus apps)

    J
    I think Tapestry 5 is better than Wicket for component web framework. :)
  24. Re: couldn't agree more[ Go to top ]

    I think Tapestry 5 is better than Wicket for component web framework. :)
    Did you really mean that? As far as I know Tapestry 5 has been long ruled out from the serious contenders. Maybe for some lab work or experimentation at college Tapestry 5 would be considered as OK. But when it comes to serious applications at serious organisations where big cash is being invested I can't be able to see the logic reasoning behind anyone's decision for going with Tapestry 5. It's simply a dead horse. Jan
  25. Re: couldn't agree more[ Go to top ]

    I think Tapestry 5 is better than Wicket for component web framework. :)


    Did you really mean that? As far as I know Tapestry 5 has been long ruled out from the serious contenders. Maybe for some lab work or experimentation at college Tapestry 5 would be considered as OK. But when it comes to serious applications at serious organisations where big cash is being invested I can't be able to see the logic reasoning behind anyone's decision for going with Tapestry 5. It's simply a dead horse.

    Jan
    I think I'm going to write a blog about T5 :)
  26. Re: couldn't agree more[ Go to top ]

    I think I'm going to write a blog about T5 :)
    It is already written: http://www.bileblog.org/2007/09/the-tapestry-bearded-wonder/ :) Congrats to the Stripes team! Stripes is my favorite action framework - lean and not overloaded with extra baggage...
  27. RE: Stripes 1.5[ Go to top ]

    Great comparison Freddy. Concise, non-political, informative. Congrats to the Stripes team. Stripes is easily my favorite Java framework. Concise, simple, clean MVC.
  28. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    From the "maybe we should call it Cold Dead Fish" Department.

    Hail the Tim! Hail Them!


    Uhh ... wow, Cartman. That is one sick post, dude!

    Anyway ... how would the original poster compare Stripes with Wicket, which happens to be on the same page of topics today? We have a plethora of frameworks to choose from, and also an excessive number of them ;-)

    Seriously, what do you think are the advantages and disadvantages of each framework?
    This is just my personal opinion that is going to get me flamed but... I used Wicket for 6 months and Stripes for 1 (maybe two). I felt that I understood Stripes better than I ever understood Wicket. The documentation on Stripes is amazing and the learning curve is so unbelievably short. If you ever need to look at the source code, it's easy to understand and well commented (I didn't feel that way about Wicket). One thing Wicket does better is making a webapp that's like a wizard. Other than that, I'd use Stripes over it for all my projects.
  29. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    This is just my personal opinion that is going to get me flamed but... I used Wicket for 6 months and Stripes for 1 (maybe two). I felt that I understood Stripes better than I ever understood Wicket. The documentation on Stripes is amazing and the learning curve is so unbelievably short. If you ever need to look at the source code, it's easy to understand and well commented (I didn't feel that way about Wicket).
    I think that Wicket is well documented, certainly compared to many other frameworks out there (though Stripes might be documented even better). But I'll be the first to admit that Stripes is easier to understand; Both frameworks have completely different ambition levels (and I don't mean that in a negative way). I think you can compare it to Hibernate vs iBatis. Hibernate tries to solve the impedance mismatch between OO programming and the relation model, Wicket tries to do the same thing for OO programming and stateless HTTP. iBatis provides a way to make the relational model easier to handle without going so far as trying to provide a solution for the impedance mismatch, and I believe the same thing is true for Stripes. Whichever you choose, Hibernate or iBatis, Wicket or Stripes, both have strong and weak points.
  30. Stripes and Wicket[ Go to top ]

    I think you can compare it to Hibernate vs iBatis. Hibernate tries to solve the impedance mismatch between OO programming and the relation model, Wicket tries to do the same thing for OO programming and stateless HTTP. iBatis provides a way to make the relational model easier to handle without going so far as trying to provide a solution for the impedance mismatch, and I believe the same thing is true for Stripes. Whichever you choose, Hibernate or iBatis, Wicket or Stripes, both have strong and weak points.
    That's an excellent way of putting it, Eelco. I particularly like the Hibernate vs iBATIS analogy. The two comparisons do have a lot in common. One framework aims to do "more" for you than the other, and that can either be a good thing or a bad thing depending on how it fits in with your requirements. Just like I don't think you can argue with anyone who much prefers one of Hibernate or iBATIS over the other, the same goes with Stripes or Wicket, because these frameworks are among the best at what they do. Cheers, Freddy
  31. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    I used Wicket for 6 months and Stripes for 1 (maybe two). I felt that I understood Stripes better than I ever understood Wicket.
    "Very simple" can be a sin itself. The perception that Stripes is "very simple" might stop it from being massively used, just as IBatis. Many people tend to avoid tools that are regarded as "very simple" even it is the right tool for the job, though few will admit that.
  32. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    Unless its the buzzword of the day, e.g. Ruby.
  33. Re: ...[ Go to top ]

    hmm, oh my friend you are still living on the Ruby hype? Move on. If I would use a scripting language it will be Python is more compact, easy and fast. Ruby is slow as hell even with virtual machines plus Ruby seems as a bad version of Smalltalk, I would use better Smalltalk than Ruby. 2c.
  34. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    Hey whats up with Will Hartung? He smoked to much or is just a Big Troll!. Congratulations to Stripes Team, Stripes is my favorite action framework. Tapestry 5 is my favorite component based framework. ZK framework is very cool for Ajax based(I like more than GWT). Flex3 yeah for true RIA or using AIR with Dojo is also cool. Frameworks I hate or I don't want to use: JSF, Struts2, RIFE, Wicket, GWT, Struts, Seam, JavaFX.
  35. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    Hey whats up with Will Hartung? He smoked to much or is just a Big Troll!
    He wasn't trolling. He was having a little fun with what was a very unexciting write up. In other words, the write up did not make a good case for Stripes or why we should care. He wasn't commenting on Stripes itself. If you visit this site often, you must be aware of how many of these framework release announcements we see here. There are zillions, most of which most of us either haven't heard of or know nothing about. I thought Will's post was very funny. I would have ignored this post and thread and not learned anything about Stripes otherwise. Who cares about "cold dead fish" (i.e. sushi)? As a Stripes fan, you should thank him.
  36. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    @Jan de Jonge he is a Troll that's for sure, I have seen him on Javalobby and praising his wonderful framework that in the future he will release wow that was like 2 years ago I don't see any framework. Tapestry 5 is live and well and the code quality of Tapestry 5 is really top notch with very neat ideas, I would liked that JSF was like Tapestry 5, It is a super RAD framework. Tapestry 5 creator is a genius I respect him a lot and yes he went to rewrite the framework 2 times but because he is a perfectionist and he have the skills to rewrite a complete framework anytime clean and lean. If you are afraid of learn new frameworks or API's or languages you should not be a programmer, Sun is rewriting the desktop Java with JavaFX, Microsoft every 5 years or less rewrite their technology, etc. Tapestry 5 architecture is now very stable and Howard already said he will not anymore rewrite Tapestry for the people that whine a lot of the 2 rewrites of Tapestry. @William hmm so we need from time to time a smoked guy to promote a work or project for people know about it heheh that is really funny. I'm always aware of new frameworks, languages etc to improve my job and give the best of me to my employer or customers and not stay as a dinosaur with the same framework thinking with it I will retire with the same tools. No, I'm not searching of funny things or articles to be aware of new projects. Im not just a Stripes fan, As I said I use now Tapestry 5, ZK, Spring MVC, Stripes, Flex3. Before I used Struts, Wicket and little bit JSF. Even I tested OpenXava just to know if works for me or not.
  37. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    Frameworks I hate or I don't want to use: JSF, Struts2, RIFE, Wicket, GWT, Struts, Seam, JavaFX.
    Relax, no one cares. IMO, Stripes is the best Java action framework, simple, clean, easy to learn. Guys, keep it small and observable!
  38. Re: Stripes 1.5 released[ Go to top ]

    Congratulations to the Stripes team on this achievement. Stripes is a clean, no nonsense web framework with solid documentation to boot. Its nice to see that Stripes has stuck to its root principles and not succumb to buzzwords and feature creep which so often happens. kind regards bob
  39. Stripes is freak'in awesome[ Go to top ]

    From someone that had to stand up a multi-threaded web app in 2 months (including designs and iterations), Strips is the ticket. In a word it was painless. All other frameworks such wicket and struts tremble at it's might. :) Seriously, congratulations as making one of the pleasurable to use web frameworks even better.
  40. Maven build[ Go to top ]

    Does stripes uses maven as it build tool?
  41. Re: Maven build[ Go to top ]

    Does stripes uses maven as it build tool?
    No. However, Stripes is available if you want to use it via Maven in your own projects. If version 1.5 is not there yet, it should be shortly.
  42. Velocity support[ Go to top ]

    Any chance for Velocity support in Stripes?
  43. Re: Velocity support[ Go to top ]

    Hi Serge, You can integrate Velocity for use with Stripes, because Stripes is essentially view template technology-agnostic. However, because Velocity doesn't support JSP tag libraries, you would lose the benefits that the Stripes tag library provides. If you can live with that, then there's no problem using Velocity with Stripes. Cheers, Freddy
  44. Re: Velocity support[ Go to top ]

    I would be very curious to know what the stripes team uses for 1.)templating (freemarker or jstl) and 2.) ajax widgets. Do you guys have a preference?
  45. Re: Velocity support[ Go to top ]

    I would be very curious to know what the stripes team uses for 1.)templating (freemarker or jstl) and 2.) ajax widgets. Do you guys have a preference?
    As far as I know, most of the core Stripes developers use JSP/JSTL. Within Stripes users, though, it is likely to be more evenly split between JSP/JSTL and FreeMarker. As for AJAX widgets....I know that jQuery is popular, but really, Stripes is not tied to any particular framework so you are free to use the toolkit that best suits your needs.