JRebel 2.1 Released – Strolling with Struts

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News: JRebel 2.1 Released – Strolling with Struts

  1. JRebel 2.1 Released – Strolling with Struts (9 messages)

    JRebel is a productivity tool for Java EE development. It enables your team to complete more features, fix more bugs, and release quality software on schedule and under budget by eliminating time-wasting build and redeploy phases. Your whole team can use the free 30-day evaluation. We are proud to present JRebel 2.1, the "Struts" edition. The main features of this release are the reworked Struts 2.x plugin and the brand new Struts 1.x plugin that reload changes to Struts action mappings on-the-fly both from XML and Java 5 annotations. Developing Struts applications with JRebel is now easier than ever, as no restarts are necessary anymore. This release also includes support for GlassFish v3 and the Felix OSGi container it is based on. According to this survey developers spend 13% of development time or 4.3 full-time weeks every year redeploying on the GlassFish v2 container. GlassFish v3 boasts improved startup time, but with JRebel you can take the cost of making a change down to zero. Starting with this release JRebel will report some anonymous usage statistics to our servers (including jvm name and version, container name and version, frameworks you use and redeploy stats). You can see all of the data in the jrebel.info text file created next to jrebel.jar This data will be used to help us prioritize development, but if you wouldn't like to send it please add -Drebel.usage_reporting=false to the JVM command line. Finally this release includes a multitude of fixes that were found since the 2.0.3 release. A lot of them concern the Spring plugin, though a few bugs were also found in the JRebel core. NB! We have renamed "javarebel.jar" to "jrebel.jar" and you'll have to update your installation command line accordingly. Proceed to download or view the full changelog.
  2. Sounds good! Glassfish V3 isn't even officially released and you already support it. Incredible! :) I do have to say though that Glassfish V3 is incredibly lightweight. A deployment only takes a few seconds and best of all, sessions are preserved during redeployments. This mitigates the use of JRebel somewhat, although indeed zero is always better than 'something' in this case ;)
  3. I do have to say though that Glassfish V3 is incredibly lightweight. A deployment only takes a few seconds and best of all, sessions are preserved during redeployments.
    Well, Tomcat is even more lightweight and sessions have been preserved since about 2005, but people still report spending 13% of time redeploying on it :) It's not the container, but app startup that takes most of the time (with the possible exception of WebSphere), so GFv3 won't make that much of a difference as you think.
  4. <blockquote It's not the container, but app startup that takes most of the time (with the possible exception of WebSphere), so GFv3 won't make that much of a difference as you think.</blockquote> Of course, that is indeed a very important remark that I forgot to add in my enthusiasm about the new super fast startup times of Glassfish V3. Indeed, an application deployed on Tomcat utilizing Hibernate/JPA and dynamic scanning for entity annotations, with a fair amount of classes and multiple persistence units can take up to 15 seconds to start on my system (2,4Ghz C2Q, 4GB RAM, Debian Linux). Now throw in some other goodies that steel time away from the startup process (Quartz, JSF, etc) and you might be looking at close to 20 seconds. Yet, a bare Tomcat with just the default web apps deployed takes a little under a second to start up. Needless to say that JRebel helps A LOT for that first case ;)
  5. Now throw in some other goodies that steel time away from the startup process (Quartz, JSF, etc) and you might be looking at close to 20 seconds.
    20 secs is a very good startup time. The average from our survey was 2.5 minutes. Consider yourself lucky :)
  6. I do have to say though that Glassfish V3 is incredibly lightweight. A deployment only takes a few seconds and best of all, sessions are preserved during redeployments.

    Well, Tomcat is even more lightweight and sessions have been preserved since about 2005, but people still report spending 13% of time redeploying on it :) It's not the container, but app startup that takes most of the time (with the possible exception of WebSphere), so GFv3 won't make that much of a difference as you think.
    Jevgeni, could you please explain what did you mean under "(with the possible exception of WebSphere)"?
  7. I do have to say though that Glassfish V3 is incredibly lightweight. A deployment only takes a few seconds and best of all, sessions are preserved during redeployments.

    Well, Tomcat is even more lightweight and sessions have been preserved since about 2005, but people still report spending 13% of time redeploying on it :) It's not the container, but app startup that takes most of the time (with the possible exception of WebSphere), so GFv3 won't make that much of a difference as you think.


    Jevgeni, could you please explain what did you mean under "(with the possible exception of WebSphere)"?
    I guess Jevgeni meant that on WebSphere, the container startup is so slow that it can take more time that the application startup (as is the case with the other containers).
  8. this tool support development with JSF?
  9. this tool support development with JSF?
    Yes.
  10. IDEA[ Go to top ]

    When will the IDEA plugin be updated?