James Gosling Extols the Virtues of HashTables and RAM - *audio*

Home

News: James Gosling Extols the Virtues of HashTables and RAM - *audio*

  1. Looking back at some of the most popular sessions at TSSJS 2011, James Gosling's name comes to the top of the list. One of the interesting points James Gosling has mentioned in the last couple of interviews or keynotes he has done is how much he likes the use of HashTables and loads of RAM as an alternative to the overhead of complex relationsal database systems.

    We've acutally clipped the audio portion of James' keynote where he discusses this strategy, while providing a little insight on this implementation pattern. Check it out:

    James Gosling Extols the Virtues of HashTables and RAM - *AUDIO*



    Threaded Messages (10)

  2. Link?[ Go to top ]

    Is it just me, or the article indeed does not have a clickable link to audio?

  3. The Link is Hiding[ Go to top ]

    The link seems to be formatted as the same color as the text, ( and not underlined), in this post for some reason. The following line in the post above should be clickable and lead you to the multimedia.

    James Gosling Extols the Virtues of HashTables and RAM - *AUDIO*

    Hope that works. *Very quirky behavior.*

  4. Enterprise Approach[ Go to top ]

    http://www-01.ibm.com/software/webservers/appserv/extremescale/

  5. HashTables in RAM[ Go to top ]

    No informative value without context.

  6.  James Gosling has mentioned in the last couple of interviews or keynotes he has done is how much he likes the use of HashTables and loads of RAM as an alternative to the overhead of complex relationsal database systems.

    Couldn't agree more .. there has been recent papers in past year which provide some scientific evident that Memory could also be more cost effective then disk if you couple performance and capacity togather.

    I've put a summary of those point in few posts - the latest one titled "Memory is the New Disk for the Enterprise"

    Memory can be x100, x1000 more efficient than disk

    Memory vs Disk cost decreased  by 360x over the last 25 years.

    Even a 1% miss ratio for a DRAM cache costs a factor of 10x in performance

     

    My 2c

    Nati S

    GigaSpaces 




     

  7. Nightmare ahead[ Go to top ]

    Can you imagine the nightmare systems that less able people will create having read this? Bad enough with people using NOSQL, because it is cool, when their app would happily function with an RDBMS on a ten year old PC.

  8. I generally take a horses for courses policy, and I agree with JG. I have seen this more often than not, where a performance improvement solution for a disk based db, ends up being NVPs stored in RAM. Lately with the proliferation of social media networks, this has combined with the use of tools such as memcached to gain performance unparalleled by disk based db.

    IMO in-memory NVPs works just fine if entity relationship is not a requirement. The general rule of thumb I prefer is to model the db according to the business domain. Any thing else an application requires are handled by NVPs. One problem I face though is to measure the RAM requirement under such a circumstance. This is due to what someoen else has already commented on. It is easy to digress and corrupt the architecture. NVPs are easy to create and hard to define security parameters on. This last aspect is what DBs provide with abundance.

    So, while I would personally design system in this manner, I am often wary of the developers who could mess up my plans greatly.

    So, there you go, it's a territory that should be treaded carefully. DBs are not dead and will never die. But horses for courses is a policy that always works.

  9. Enterprise Hashmap[ Go to top ]

    From this earlier TSS thread:

    http://www.theserverside.com/news/thread.tss?thread_id=43256

    I guess that could be considered "Hashtable EE" ;-)

    Peacee,

    Cameron Purdy | Oracle Coherence

    http://coherence.oracle.com/

  10. Wow...[ Go to top ]

    Wow, did the new content management system ever destroy the formatting on that piece you referenced there. A great interview nonetheless. 

     

    *Thumbs*

  11. Hashtables vs rdbms[ Go to top ]

    Isn't using a 2nd level cache with JPA/hibernate the same thing as hashtables in ram with the added benefit of all the data persistance being taken care of for you, and full reporting capabilities (ie. querying) when needed?