jqGrid, REST, AJAX and Spring MVC Integration

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  1. More than two years back I wrote an article on how two implement elegant CRUD in Struts2. Actually I had to devote two articles on that subject because the topic was so broad. Today I have taken much more lightweight and modern approach with a set of popular and well established frameworks and libraries.

    Namely, we will use Spring MVC on the back-end to provide REST interface to our resources, fabulous jqGrid plugin for jQuery to render tabular grids (and much more!) and we will wire up everything with a pinch of JavaScript and AJAX.

    Check the tutorial at the following URL:

    Java Code Geeks: jqGrid, REST, AJAX and Spring MVC Integration

    Threaded Messages (12)

  2. You forgot to add KLEENEX in the mix. Perhaps I am missing a few more frameworks to be included. For tables are hard, what with columns and rows and what not.

     

     

  3. Sad[ Go to top ]

    People still use Spring MVC? In this era of modern, matured and sexy Web frameworks around? Don't cite the L (legacy) word as excuse. I know it's very simple and the Struts guys grasp it easily but Spring MVC is just too primitive and old fashioned for these times. Not starting a flame ear though:-).

    Jan

  4. Sad[ Go to top ]

    And what do you use for your development ?

  5. Sad[ Go to top ]

    Have you ever heared of GWT, Wicket and JSF?

  6. Sad[ Go to top ]

    • JSF : yes, I use it (JSF / Seam), but for high throughput sites or accessibiilty compliance JSF is KO. 
      We've made a little benchmarck Spring MVC / JSF : response time ratio is 5. 
      So, great for small / medium web sites without  accessibility constraints.
    • Wicket : didn't used it. More or less same thing than JSF I think.
    • GWT : never used it to my great shame ;)
  7. Sad or not?[ Go to top ]

    How do you know the performance ratio of 5 is caused by JSF not partly by Seam?

    Anyway, I won't bother with your JSF 1.2 benchmark since JSF 2.0 has been out for a long time. Have you heard about Partial State Saving?

  8. Sad or not?[ Go to top ]

    <quote>How do you know the performance ratio of 5 is caused by JSF not partly by Seam?</quote>

    We didn't took the time to investigate (JSF 1.2 without Seam is a no-go for us).

     

    <quote>Anyway, I won't bother with your JSF 1.2 benchmark since JSF 2.0 has been out for a long time.</quote>

    We've also tested Seam 3 with JSF 2 (and partial view state saving). Our results are similaire (partial state saving saves memory usage but consumes CPU).

    Here's more or less the ratio we've found (reference ratio is Seam 2 with JSF 1.2).

    Flex test is not really interesting here but I put it anyway.

    Flex 3,21

    Seam 3 - JSF 2 0,95

    Seam 2 – JSF 1.2 1,00

    Spring MVC 3 5,15

    Spring MVC 3 Json 7,92

     

  9. Re:[ Go to top ]

    Why do you need Seam 3 for the JSF 2 performance test then?

  10. Akhbar e Jehan[ Go to top ]

    wow its nice article thankx to share me anice information about progrming its very help to me in my study

    Akhbar e Jehan

     

  11. christian forum[ Go to top ]

    wow its nice information about programing i think c++ is easy to this its more difficiult for this thankx to share me this nice artcle

    http://azusachristiancommunity.org/christian forum

  12. jqGrid and ajax[ Go to top ]

    Thanks for this nice tutorial. It saved me a lot of time while setting up the jqGrid plugin with some other ajax functionality.

  13. nice dude[ Go to top ]

    How do you know the performance ratio of 5 is caused by JSF not partly by Seam?

    Anyway, I won't bother with your JSF 1.2 benchmark since JSF 2.0 has been out for a long time. Have you heard about Partial State Saving?

    mybazaar