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News: Early Adoption is Fun but a Bad Decision Maker

  1. Early Adoption is Fun but a Bad Decision Maker (13 messages)

    Relationships go through phases: you meet someone, you get to know them better, you commit to them, you break up. The part everyone really enjoys is the second phase, the discovery phase.

    Discovery is what drives programmers, usually. It's the push to do something new, to find a better way to do something, to alwas create.

    This is a bad decision maker, really. It's fun, but you don't biuld a good marriage out of the discovery phase, you build a good marriage after you've get past all the wierd things she does in the morning and you see her without her makeup. The discovery phase is what attracts you to something, but it's rarely enought o actually make a lasting relationship.

    So let's look at languages. Scala's a good example. It's new, it solves a problem well, and it has the clear and early benefit that it's not java and doesn't look like java.

    So Scala fires up the feeling of discovery and people like it. That's where we are now, people are generally still liking it because they haven't really experienced it in the morning (or had maintenance brogrammers tell them that they don't understand some cool core scala feature so could they maybe fix the code.)

    Actually, Scala may already be topping out here - people already see that the language isn't perfect. It's losing some of its shine, and some of the early adopters are already hunting for the next big thing.

    For me, that's a good sign. I've looked at Scala. I can't say I really understand it yet, because i see how i could do what scala does with Java and other languages, too, and the normal way of doing things in scala seem to be more obscure than anything else. When "( _ . _ )" is acceptable code, it doesn't look serious to me. It looks like a kid's idea of what a joke should be.

    But the fact that people are starting to look at it as if its a real language with real flaws along with its features, that's when the language starts to consider its long term health and growth, and when it starts to consider how to maintain itself for the long term. That means my investment in Scala is starting to turn from something that's a contact high to something that could actually be meaningful in the long run.

    It's like a tool, you know? The torx wrench is really neat, and if you saw one in the store you might buy it. But you don't have any torx bolts, so the new wrench is going to hang out in your toolbox for a long time, probably forgotten except that you remember you thought it was neat.

    But if torx bolts were to actually show up on something you own (which it might, I guess, because they're used in some consumer electronics) the wrench might actually get used, and you might learn what it's really good for (mostly annoying consumers like me right now, because torx things aren't standard enough to count.)

    That's my whole point: there's a point at which new stuff is shiny and attractive, and that's great. Without the shiny aspect, we'd still be using cobol because we woudln't know or care what new things we could do. But at the same time, we need to be aware that there's more to life than discovery. you have to set up shop and get things done once in a while.

    And since it's JavaOne and JavaFX just got released, I'll say it now: JavaFX is going to get some play from the early adopters who haven't gotten burned too badly by it already, just like JSF did. But it's going to go away unless Oracle rams it down our throats like a bad penny.

    Threaded Messages (13)

  2. +1[ Go to top ]

    I've been looking at a lot of languages of late and none of them gave me the "ohhh, this is the next thing" feeling that Java gave me 10+ years ago. I see Groovy happening because of Grails, Gradle, Griffon and groovy support in Maven and ANT. But Scala... Not sure if the awkwardness out weighs the gains.

    JavaFX can only become succesful if the gains out weigh the costs of learning it. Now. If they get the HTML5 thing working and you can use one FXML to run on multiple platforms, probably scripted by embedded JavaScript (personally I would take the GWT approach and convert embedded Java to JavaScript), then it has merrits. It would be a PhoneGap thing, only backed by Oracle and Java.  

  3. Java on the client. NOT !![ Go to top ]

     

    Any client technology with the word Java in it, is a dead investment of time. IMHO. I can't believe that "the powers that be" at Oracle has not put this poor beast out of every ones misery.

  4. Java on the client. NOT !![ Go to top ]

     

    Any client technology with the word Java in it, is a dead investment of time. IMHO. I can't believe that "the powers that be" at Oracle has not put this poor beast out of every ones misery.

    What is your proposal for the next technology, if it is not java? Who's next candidate for such enterprise?

  5. Flex or HTML5[ Go to top ]

    Flex or HTML5. Java has not been relevant on the client side for many years.

  6. How about GWT?[ Go to top ]

    I personally believe that GWT has the potential and has already proven to be an extremely valuable toolkit on the client side.

  7. Re[ Go to top ]

    We have been investing quite heavily in this area and currently have support for Flex, Air, Titanium (Mobile) and others, all using Java on the client side. Feel free to check things out and provide some feedback. Long live Java and yes on the client side as well specially for the enterprise.

    www.emitrom.com

    Alfredo

     

  8. Question.[ Go to top ]

    If you're using Flex/Air on the client side, how can you also be using Java on the client side ?

  9. GwtFlex[ Go to top ]

    If you're using Flex/Air on the client side, how can you also be using Java on the client side ?

    At Emitrom we created a tool called Gwt4Flex wich leverage the Google Web Toolkit and helps write Flex Application entirely in java. You can see a demo here http://www.gwt4air.appspot.com/ . To find out more visit us a http://www.emitrom.com

     

    Cheers,

     

    Alain

  10. How about GWT?[ Go to top ]

    GWT is nice for building stateless clients, and is friendly to java on server side. But compilation takes awfult lot of build time.

    Plus in terms of visual capabilities I believe it is behind both flash and HTML5

  11. How about GWT?[ Go to top ]

    GWT is nice for building stateless clients, and is friendly to java on server side. But compilation takes awfult lot of build time.

    Plus in terms of visual capabilities I believe it is behind both flash and HTML5

     

    GWT is nice (way better than JSF) but the development environment and integration with Spring and Maven is cumbersome.  We have since moved to ExtJS with ExtDirect (client server ajax is beyond trivial) and could not be happier. Development is so much faster and the gui stuff is a breeze once you learn to use Firebug. ;)

     

  12. I am glad that someone can write about what I exactly wanted to share-its becoming a ailment in IT industry that folks wnat to go behind next big thing, without even knowing why they need this next big thing

    I am not against innovation, but innovation or change just for the sake of it does not make sense, any innovation in technology should be need based and relevant for present and near future.

    Now, I hear hype around cloud and social media - I truely appreciate the benefits around it - but this should not become the ONLY things which matter. Still lots and lots of reality enterprise work is happening arounnd the industry without much hype - we got to promote these aspects of technology as well to tap unmeet and under penetrated verticals

     

     

  13. As a matter of fact I strongly believe that Scala is now in the phase of "Crossing the Chasm".

    There is a chance you would get to know and fall in love with Scala. But before that happens you need to hear many times  about the unique values that Scala gives you from so called early adopters.

    Don't forget this: You own this to those people who put their efforts in making you finally see it. Whithout those people there would be no progress at all.

    Early adoption is often risky, but when the bet is put on the right horse, then - Can we still say "Bad Decision Maker"?-

     

  14. sdf[ Go to top ]

    There is a chance you would get to know and fall in love with Scala. But before that happens you need to hear many times  about the unique values that Scala gives you from so called early adopters. http://methoo.com