Over 120 million Java-enabled mobile handsets have shipped

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News: Over 120 million Java-enabled mobile handsets have shipped

  1. Sun today announced that Java-enabled mobile handsets surpassed the 120 million mark in number of units shipped worldwide. Factors contributing to achieving this milestone include the availability of more than 200 different Java technology-enabled handsets through more than 70 carriers worldwide, a growth of 35 percent since June.

    This isn't specifically J2EE news, but is a good data point to have. The market for thin java-based mobile clients will surely contribute to an increase in the number of server side java apps to service these clients.

    Read SUN STRENGTHENS LEAD IN WORLDWIDE MOBILE DATA SERVICES WITH JAVA (press release).

    Floyd

    Threaded Messages (19)

  2. Java on the server reached the "who cares" stage (i.e. it became the "de facto standard") a couple of years ago. Java on the handheld devices still has a ways to go, but it will get there. In another two years, the "typical" (i.e. free) handset will probably have 32MB of RAM and at least that much flash, and the way it is going, it looks like they will all suppport Java, even the WINCE/PE models. Bundling Java support already costs under US$1/unit, and for the "big guys" it is supposedly around US$.60/unit.

    Java's competition on handheld devices isn't .NET/CF, but things like Brew. The .NET/CF today is basically on 0% of phones and will probably never be on more than 1% or 2% of phones (since Windows phones account for less than 1% of phone sales, although they do pretty well at the "high end".)

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  3. The .NET/CF today is basically on 0% of phones and will probably never be on more than 1% or 2% of phones


    Don't you think the Microsoft/Vodafone agreement is going to change that?

    See: http://edition.cnn.com/2003/TECH/10/13/itu.microsoft.vodafone/

    Why do you think Sun made the announcement?

    Microsoft has a history of going from 0% to market dominator, they know how to play catch-up.
  4. Don't you think the Microsoft/Vodafone agreement is going to change that?

    No. Maybe a Microsoft/Symbian agreement could, but Vodafone?

    I like the Windows phones. If they were a little smaller and I were a little richer I'd buy a couple.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!

  5. > Microsoft has a history of going from 0% to market dominator, they know how to play catch-up.

    Somewhere i read the big mobile phone manufacturers are thinking about using Linux to cut the OS licensing costs.

    If linux takes over other OSs in Mobiles, then what you guess? its a open route for java.
    And how much of role Vodafone to play with hand sets? I got a vodafone networked mobile, but everybody calls it Motorola :0) And it got Java game in it.

  6. > > Microsoft has a history of going from 0% to market dominator, they know how to play catch-up.
    >
    > Somewhere i read the big mobile phone manufacturers are thinking about using Linux to cut the OS licensing costs.
    >
    > If linux takes over other OSs in Mobiles, then what you guess? its a open route for java.
    > And how much of role Vodafone to play with hand sets? I got a vodafone networked mobile, but everybody calls it Motorola :0) And it got Java game in it.

    Oh boy, does that mean I'll be getting SMS invoices from Darth McBride or will the phone company be ordered to bill me directly.
  7. Do not underestimate M$[ Go to top ]

    The .NET/CF today is basically on 0% of phones and will probably never be on more than 1% or 2% of phones


    Long time ago somebody told me exactly same thing... about Netware and Windows NT. Guess where is Netware now.
  8. Do not underestimate M$[ Go to top ]

    Long time ago somebody told me exactly same thing... about Netware and Windows NT. Guess where is Netware now.

    Sharing a low-rent apartment with Microsoft Bob?

    Come on, please -- no company in this industry has the golden touch. Microsoft, IBM, ... they all have 9 failures for every success. Novell only had a couple of products ... obviously the odds were against them.

    Only the paranoid survive. Or perhaps, only the survivors get to say the neat catch phrases. Either way.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  9. Do not underestimate M$[ Go to top ]

    M$ did it once with Windows CE. Palm is not a monopoly in handheld market anymore.
    And there's a trend to blend these two (handhelds and phones) together.
    This alone might help M$ to get momentum in cell phones market.
  10. Do not underestimate M$[ Go to top ]

    The .NET/CF today is basically on 0% of phones and will probably never be on more than 1% or 2% of phones

    >
    > Long time ago somebody told me exactly same thing... about Netware and Windows NT. Guess where is Netware now.

    Netware is still installed in a lot of shops. Maybe it passes underneath the radar of most IT people, because it is no longer cool, but many Fortune 500 companies still use it for one reason, it is stable. Sure it still has its moments like most other OSes, but on the whole, not many Intel based OSes can claim 600 days uptime, operating under a very high and constant user load.

    The only issue for Novell is they probably left their run a bit late to get into <insert latest market trend (Linux|Web Services|J2EE)>

    Frank Speakman
  11. Do not underestimate M$[ Go to top ]

    I do not think MS has the same advantages in this arena as it does in the PC world. There are hundreds of phone models coming out every year on numerous different hardware platforms. The manufacturers have full control what's going to their phones (the user can not decide to install windows or linux) and they need that control to differentiate their products and to make sure the phones work right.

    The operators only sell what the manufacturers give them. The big brand phones are still going to be known as Nokias and Motorolas, with a little operator sticker on them. The rest are faceless clones that the customer can not identify themselves with, and do not know what to expect.

    Some manufacturers might use windows as a way to separate themselves from the pack but ultimately, they risk washing their brand if they have any. It's going to be known as a windows phone. Knowing MS, they will try to gain control over the manufacturers, and that is the only way they are going to make it. They have to put down big money (billions after billions) for something that has very low chance of succeeding. It could be an endless pit with little return.
  12. Do not underestimate M$[ Go to top ]

    "I do not think MS has the same advantages in this arena as it does in the PC world. "

    They might if interoperability comes into play. That is, having a phone be a simple plug-and-play extension to a PC.

    Also, if a single cpu dominates the market it makes it easier for an OS to dominate. And if that OS belongs to MS then ..........
  13. Unless you're buying an anonymous "pay as you go" phone it's almost impossible to buy a phone without Java on it, as long as you're not in the US that is. They're still trying to replace their analogue range with digital, about 10 years behind the rest of the world, including Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and CIS (not sure about S. America but probably way ahead of the US too).
    If I walk 200m (about 220 yards) down the road I will probably pass at least 5 phone shops, all of them have nothing but video, java, MP3 and FM Radio and Games phones. I'd say Java in on mobile handsets is more "de facto" even more so than server side machines.

    -John-
  14. John: Unless you're buying an anonymous "pay as you go" phone it's almost impossible to buy a phone without Java on it, as long as you're not in the US that is. They're still trying to replace their analogue range with digital, about 10 years behind the rest of the world, including Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and CIS (not sure about S. America but probably way ahead of the US too).

    Please, spare us the repetition of the European press. The analog (AMPS) system still exists in the US, but relatively few phones support it, and it is on its way out. The US also has a full CDMA, TDMA and GSM network, and actually multiple CDMA and GSM providers. (TDMA is just backwards compatibility for old AT&T phones.) I am leaving for London on Sunday with my new Java-enabled GSM phone (Nokia 3650) and my Orange (UK) SIM card. That phone is available from at least three US providers (mine cost -$50 from AT&T via Amazon.) The market in the US is very different in some ways from the European market, but your assertions are ridiculous. I've had digital data services (yes, an IP connection) from my CDMA cell phone for my notebook for over five years, for example.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  15. "it's almost impossible to buy a phone without Java on it, as long as you're not in the US that is."

    Yeah, but we've got some awesome nukes, baby!
  16. I agree the US have made a lot of progress recently, you can now wonder around most malls and pick up decent Java phones. I have also however spent hours on almost every visit battling with backwards US phone providors all insisting that they have the most advanced system in the World, one thing they are good at though ... "and how you you like to pay for that sir"?

    You are still more likely to see people in New York (for example) using pagers to communicate than their mobiles. You can still (even now) buy phones in the US that don't support SMS and it is impossible to buy a phone in the US without an ID, passport or SS No. (i.e. anonymously). You've only got to wonder a few miles out of most major Cities (East or West Coast) and you find yourself very quickly on a roaming service, often analogue.

    The US youth is now concidered one of the world'd major mobile phone booms so as long the phone companies spend enough on the infrastructure and don't run out of money then you're in a good position, just like India and China.

    Enjoy London, you'll meet a lot of other 3650s there.

    -John-
  17. John,

    You are still more likely to see people in New York (for example) using pagers to communicate than their mobiles.

    Pagers? You're kidding me! Pagers are mainly used for IT staff that are wired into management systems (they get paged when servers die for example). I don't personally know anyone else who uses a pager.

    it is impossible to buy a phone in the US without an ID, passport or SS No. (i.e. anonymously).

    True. That's a law. It's not an accident. You can't get a passport here without identification either. ;-)

    You've only got to wonder a few miles out of most major Cities (East or West Coast) and you find yourself very quickly on a roaming service, often analogue.

    It's a big country, seriously, and unfortunately everything is very spread out. We call it urban sprawl. The reason you are seeing the analog service is that the analog frequencies are lower and thus each tower covers much more area. (The high-frequency 1800/1900Mhz etc. bands apparently don't carry far at all.) I've only been to a couple of places in the past couple of years that didn't have digital coverage (like Stowe Mountain in Vermont, although it is like 230 miles outside of the closest big city ;-).

    Eventually it will all probably consolidate into a single unified system, but without a government licensed monopoly (as is the case in many European countries) we have multiple networks in the meantime. It looks like the CDMA and GSM systems are headed for eventual merging, starting with 1xRTT. At least that's what I read; I don't know much about it.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  18. One quick reply before I go to bed.

    Pagers, OK there're less and less of them but watch out for them tomorrow, I'm sure you'll see a few if you work in NYC, I've not seen one in Europe for over 10 years, in fact they never really took off here.

    No anonymous phones, so what happened to freedom, I thought you were "the land of the free"? You're all tagged for life, your taxes too. :-)

    "It's a big country", well it actually smaller then Europe when you include the Eastern block, we have areas just as remote too. True there are a few places in Scotland well over 100 miles from anything remotely resembling a town with limited service but I can travel from one end of Europe to the other without hitting a dead zone, and even the old USSR doesn't use analogue. Try driving a few miles outside of D.C. or even downtown Omaha, I kept getting analogue there.

    It's been a major step forward having GSM in the "modern" US cities, it was always rather strange having a phone that works EVERYWHERE from central China, to the deserts of Australia, from Egypt to the planes of South Africa but became a Java running brick in America, having said that it was still a lighter brick that your average US phone.

    Quoting from the great leader:-

    Looking at these gadgets that work only abroad, Mr [James] Gosling said: "Living here in North America is like living in the Third World."

    Perhaps we'll class you as a developing nation now.

    -John-
    PS: Are you in Vermont? Do you know Bernard Sanders (House of Reps), he put up a great opposition to Greenspan a month or two ago.
  19. Try driving a few miles outside of D.C. or even downtown Omaha, I kept getting analogue there.

    Different networks have different coverage, and the GSM network here is still being built out (although it's pretty good now). A couple years ago, the only good (or semi-good) nationwide networks were Sprint's and AT&T's, and Sprint was/is CDMA and AT&T was TDMA, so if you had GSM you were SOL. That's changing though, now that most carriers are going GSM (including AT&T). Sprint's network is really good as long as you are in an urban area or on a major highway (interstates, etc.), but they don't bother covering anything else because of the economics. Remember, in the US, telcos have to compete for business :-O.

    Perhaps we'll class you as a developing nation now.

    I'm not personally into these nationalistic competitions ;-). Europeans got their mobile networks working really well in a hurry .. good for them. We're getting to reap some of the benefits too, so it's not a bad thing for us (even if we had to wait a little longer for some things like world phones). It's been good for the rest of the world too, because a lot of places now get to have communication where land lines have not been economically feasible.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  20. Microsoft has shipped Over 20m MS-enabled mobile phones ;) This market is very important to Microsoft. Old habbits die hard:
    Sendo sues Microsoft over 'stolen' secrets