Anyone using SubVersion with Eclipse? Or refactoring with CVS?

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General J2EE: Anyone using SubVersion with Eclipse? Or refactoring with CVS?

  1. I just installed SubVersion and installed TortoiseCVN and have been reading up on it and playing around. I think SubVersion is great but it's missing a few things, although more on the client side. The CLI works fine but integration with tools is lacking:

    - no check in/out or file locking support means it's unusable for binary files
    - tortoiseSVN can't move a directory from one directory to another (I think it's a bug and reported it to the mailing list)
    - eclipse integration isn't complete and doesn't work with WSAD. Officially there is no plugin release for SVN 1.0

    I was really hoping to use SubVersion but I think we will have to use CVS until SVN clients becomes more mature. My main gripe with CVS is the problem with renaming & moving files & directories. So I'm curious: Are people doing a lot of refactoring with Eclipse & CVS? How does Eclipse handle refactoring (renaming a class, moving a class to another package, etc.) with CVS? If the Eclipse/CVS integration handles this then I'm definitely going to go with CVS over SVN.

    Thanks,
    Michael Mattox
  2. Subclipse project...[ Go to top ]

    If you want to contribute to the Subclipse project,
    join the Subclipse developer mailing list

    http://subclipse.tigris.org/servlets/ProjectMailingListList

    http://subclipse.tigris.org
  3. In my experience, Eclipse has a very nice refactoring engine (at least for Java). Eclipse also does as pretty good job of overcoming some of CVS's limitations. Eclipse keeps track of which files you have deleted, moved and renamed, and make the necessary updates in CVS.

    Bear in mind, though, that you still suffer from the fundamental limitations of CVS. Eclipse translates a move or rename operation into a delete/add operation in CVS (delete the old version of the file, add the new version). Eclipse cannot magically force CVS to associate the old and new files, so you lose all historical ties between the old code and the new code in source control.

    Personally I think SubVersion looks very promising.
  4. In my experience, Eclipse has a very nice refactoring engine (at least for Java). Eclipse also does as pretty good job of overcoming some of CVS's limitations. Eclipse keeps track of which files you have deleted, moved and renamed, and make the necessary updates in CVS.Bear in mind, though, that you still suffer from the fundamental limitations of CVS. Eclipse translates a move or rename operation into a delete/add operation in CVS (delete the old version of the file, add the new version). Eclipse cannot magically force CVS to associate the old and new files, so you lose all historical ties between the old code and the new code in source control.Personally I think SubVersion looks very promising.
    It's good to know that Eclipse helps to overcome CVS limitations, and I understand about the history. This is the reason I've been avoiding CVS, I hate to lose my history. But SVN does the same thing, they do an add/delete but so far I haven't determined if the history is still there due to the TSVN bug (which has already been fixed and will be released in a few days).