JavaServer Faces goes open source

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News: JavaServer Faces goes open source

  1. JavaServer Faces goes open source (14 messages)

    Sun has created a new Java.net project for the development of the reference implementation of JavaServer Faces.

    Ed Burns said the project aims to be the most complete implementation of the spec, have a fast turn-around time, build a community of developers, and to demonstrate uncompromising commitment to test-first development and code review for all code coming into the project.

    Here is the announcement from Ed Burns of Sun:
    People have been requesting that Sun release the source code of its implementation of JavaServer(TM) Faces Technology for several years, and Sun's answer has been that doing so is under review. I won't go into the reasons for the length of the review process, but I'm happy to announce that it's finally complete. We have created an open development project on java.net to host the continuing development of Sun's JavaServer Faces implementation. All previously internal development will be done in this project; there is no private source tree that we really use. In other words, this project is not just for show. Please read the FAQ for answers to such pressing questions as "how do I get and build the source".

    You'll note that I didn't use the term "open source", but rather, "open development". We're doing so out of respect for the rigorous definition of the term supplied by the Open Source Definition (OSD). I'm not a lawyer, and I can't tell you where the Java Research License, which we're using for our project, stands with respect to the OSD. I'll leave that to someone who doesn't write code!

    In any case, as with any open development project, there are many levels of participation. You can file bugs so we know about them and can get the fixes to you as quickly as possible. You could simply grab our regular builds to check if your pet bug has been fixed. You can browse the source code to get an explanation of the behavior you're wondering about. You can, also (my favorite) build the code yourself and run it in a debugger for the ultimate in development transparency.
    Read the full announcement: Welcome to the JavaServer (TM) Faces Implementation Project!

    Java.net JSF project home

    -James
    Faces Console GUI Tool
    http://www.jamesholmes.com/JavaServerFaces/

    Threaded Messages (14)

  2. JavaServer Faces goes open source[ Go to top ]

    open development project != open source ?
  3. What more can you ask for?[ Go to top ]

    [quote]
    You can browse the source code to get an explanation of the behavior you're wondering about.
    [/quote]

    How much more 'open' can this get? Why does SOMEONE always have to detract from the efforts to PLEASE the development community? Jesus, and i bet that Mark wouldn't bother DL source for this anyways, yet feels the need to question if it is OS or not.

    -Chris
  4. What more can you ask for?[ Go to top ]

    [quote]You can browse the source code to get an explanation of the behavior you're wondering about.[/quote]How much more 'open' can this get? Why does SOMEONE always have to detract from the efforts to PLEASE the development community? Jesus, and i bet that Mark wouldn't bother DL source for this anyways, yet feels the need to question if it is OS or not.-Chris
    I was just wondering if someone had looked into this because a bunch of people are whining over at Javalobby (not that they don't here too). I do have the need to clarify.

    So I looked into it.

    It is "open source". Just not for commercial projects. But I can use the binary, which for most is more than fine. I don't think they even call it open source. They call it open development (Java Research License). Which I think is a nice distinction and we should use it. (I am referring to the j3d-core project)
  5. What more can you ask for?[ Go to top ]

    Oops. Got a little mixed up with my posts. Still applies though.
  6. What more can you ask for?[ Go to top ]

    It is "open source". Just not for commercial projects.
    Sorry, but <em>by definition</em> that means it's not open source software!
  7. What more can you ask for?[ Go to top ]

    It is "open source". Just not for commercial projects.
    Sorry, but <em>by definition</em> that means it's not open source software!
    That was my point (and why I used quotes). Of course the link you provided is the Open Source (TM on the Icon) definition. It is not "without restriction" "open source". And thus the point of my other posts. THEY are not calling it open source. And I am more than willing to call it what they call it because, in most peoples minds, open source denotes 'free'(as in nontaxable-gift) and THEIR wording makes it clear.
  8. Although it makes it easier to view the progress of a project, and allows developers to use the source code to debug problems, I can't say I'm a fan of the Java Research License. It's a "look but don't touch" license that expressly forbids any commercial development based on the source code. These kinds of licenses always set off Intellectual Property warning bells.

    You can contribute code or fixes back to Sun, but since it isn't legally compatible with anything that isn't under the Java Research License, why bother?
  9. Hi, I've hear many things about JSF, and I want to see any example online.

    I think that this could be a good technology, but I suppose that at last all we have is the same html client(although sure that we have a great organization in the server-side code that generates that HTML).

    I'm using Flash based clients that I think that provides a lot more potential that any client based on HTML, that's the reason to see any JSF example. I strongly think that at last if all you have is html you has the same problems when you want to create clients with a more advanced interface (show maps, get data on demand, get data in the same page avoiding tedious navigation, get vector graphics, etc...could I get some of this with JSF?).

    I'll apreciate too much any resource that you can share...

    Thanks in advance...
  10. I'm using Flash based clients that I think that provides a lot more potential that any client based on HTML
    I have disabled Flash in my browser because it tends to use too much of my CPU resources and it makes the fan run noisy.

    As for an online example of JSF, that's hard, because you cannot know if a site uses JSF since it's a server side technology that generates pure HTML and JavaScript. Or did you mean a code example? There are examples in the J2EE 1.4 tutorial: http://java.sun.com/j2ee/1.4/docs/tutorial/doc/

    In addition, the J2EE RI and the JWSDP contain examples that you can install and run on your own machine.
  11. Not making a comment, rather asking a question..or two

    Didn't the servlet/jsp RI end up over at Jakarta and become Tomcat?

    Why not do it the same way with JSF?
  12. are the spec also open?[ Go to top ]

    Does it also means that it is absolute open? Are specs also open?

    Adolfo.
  13. are the spec also open?[ Go to top ]

    I have a question.

    If the specs were open, then how do you stop them from being changed by anybody?
  14. non profit orgs[ Go to top ]

    Usually non profit orgs or industry associations owns and develops specs approved by a comitee. That care from everybody updating new specs. Have a look to JSRs and JCP.
  15. Great article on Open Source[ Go to top ]

    Hi,

    Have a look at: http://www.dwheeler.com/oss_fs_why.html#tco

    Excellent article! Am sure all of you will like it!

    Cheers,

    Uday Parmar
    http://www.daffodildb.com