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News: Sun to make Java faster on cell phones with Java on chip tech

  1. Sun has worked out a deal with ARM, a company which has Java on a chip technology. The aim is to give a needed boost for enterprise apps and games in the mobile world. However, keep the client thin since it's not enough boost for wireless provisioning or high-end (XML/SOAP) processing yet.

    Read more in: Sun Microsystems and ARM to Deliver High-Performance, Pre-Integrated Java Solutions for Mobile Devices

    Threaded Messages (5)

  2. PicoJava[ Go to top ]

    Anyone remember PicoJava? *shudder*
  3. Have a look at http://www.jproxy.com. It delegates this havy XML/SOAP parsing onto the server side and only operates with Java interfaces on the client side. Thus you still get JAX-RPC (Web Services and the rest of J2EE APIs) on your client but with a thin runtime and no need for processing for XML parsers and SOAP binding implementations on the client.

    We're looking at porting JProxy onto the J2ME, then all J2EE API will be automatically accessible on your J2ME enabled cell phones/mobile devices.

    Cheers,
    Marat
  4. Have a look at http://www.jproxy.com. It delegates this havy XML/SOAP parsing onto the server side and only operates with Java interfaces on the client side. Thus you still get JAX-RPC (Web Services and the rest of J2EE APIs) on your client but with a thin runtime and no need for processing for XML parsers and SOAP binding implementations on the client.We're looking at porting JProxy onto the J2ME, then all J2EE API will be automatically accessible on your J2ME enabled cell phones/mobile devices.Cheers,Marat
    How it is different from Hessian http://caucho.com/hessian/index.xtp ? And why there is a need for SOAP/XML in a first place?
  5. Yes, I fully agree. XML/SOAP will not make sense on mobile devices for at least another year, unless you're into building J2ME applications that do nothing but do SOAP calls.

    The mainstream devices out there still have very tight executable file size constraints. Putting XML/SOAP capabilities in there will not leave much for anything else meaningful.
  6. Differences[ Go to top ]

    I don't know a lot about Hessian, but for glancing over the site I got an impression that Hessian is quote "Hessian Binary Web Service Protocol".

    JProxy is a generic thin Java object broker. Support for Web Services is just a subset of what it can do. Any J2EE or your custom applications API can be *declaratively* remote over HTTP(S). Please have a look at our site and samples. You need not to know any extra APIs. Basically most of the time your J2EE application need not change at all to get JProxy integrated.

    Also just as an example. This is Thinlet/JMS over JProxy/JBossMQ sample, where your client runtime is under 150 KB while you work with JMS interfaces as if you had full JMS client runtime bundled with your client. All of this over HTTP and fully asynchronous.

    Note you need Sun's plugin in your browser. I'll post a sample that will work with Microsoft's JVM soon.

    http://www.jproxy.com/thinlet/demo.html

    Cheers,
    Marat