Solaris Going Open Source

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News: Solaris Going Open Source

  1. Solaris Going Open Source (11 messages)

    Sun has given a little more information on their previous comments on making Solaris open source software. It is interesting to track this, as it could show us information on possible open sourcing of parts of Java. Sun is working through the legal issues, which seem to be holding back the full open source release of Solaris.
    The reason we have both Solaris and Linux is that I don't control the Linux [intellectual property], which limits my ability to innovate. While Solaris is part of our crown jewels, the real crown jewel is Java, and we are trying to push people to write to Java so it doesn't matter what operating system you have.

    "There are technical issues, legal issues and cultural issues that have to be resolved around this," Loiacono said. "We have had to work hard on the technical issues, like what can and cannot be open-sourced, how it will be structured and whether we have the intellectual property rights across the board."

    Also critical to the release of Solaris' code is the open-source license Sun will issue with the code. While that has yet to be decided, officials caution that the license that is chosen may not necessarily facilitate the easy adoption of the Solaris source code into a GPL (GNU General Public License) environment, which Sun officials see as very prescriptive.
    An interesting piece of technology will be in Solaris 10. You can now run code compiled on Linux, and it will run in Solaris 10.

    Solaris Goes Open Source

    Sun's Loiacono Outlines Solaris Road Map

    Threaded Messages (11)

  2. Maybe I'm jaded...[ Go to top ]

    ...but how will open-sourcing Solaris help enterprise java developers like me? I can already do everything I want with Linux or FreeBSD on open hardware, AIX suits me fine on IBM iron and Solaris doesn't cost much on Sun servers, especially in comparison to software development costs...

    Laudable goal I suppose, but it's not something this particular customer is asking for...
  3. Not agree with McCrory[ Go to top ]

    The add value of open source apps is absolutely not the cost
  4. Not agree with McCrory[ Go to top ]

    The add value of open source apps is absolutely not the cost
    +1
  5. Solaris Going Open Source[ Go to top ]

    It's too late now that they ought to do it few years ago.
  6. Open source Solaris : excellent news[ Go to top ]

    Open sourcing Solaris is an excellent idea. It will benefit both Sun and the Open source community. I don't know if they plan on releasing a intel version but it would be great.
  7. SlowLaris Going Open Source[ Go to top ]

    Does that mean they'll park Sparc and will go with Opteron-64 and Linux as well?
    That would be great. (include Tomcat on 'x86 Linux machine and we have something that would sell).

    .V
  8. SlowLaris Going Open Source[ Go to top ]

    Does that mean they'll park Sparc and will go with Opteron-64 and Linux as well?That would be great. (include Tomcat on 'x86 Linux machine and we have something that would sell)..V
    We just had a inhouse meeting at the company I work at (we do tv ratings) with Sun and they basically informed us that Solaris for both the Sparc and x86 will be on the exact same release schedule from now on. No longer will the x86 version play a back seat role at Sun.

    They are also going to directly support RedHat and SUSE on their x86 based hardware blades as well as Solaris x86. So the answer to your question is, no, they will not be replacing Sparcs with x86 processors or replacing Solaris with Linux.

    Sun also claimed that they see the industry coming back full circlt to the big monolithic machines with many CPUs versus the smaller number of CPU horizontal handware scaling with blades. Only time will tell if they are correct in that claim.
  9. SlowLaris Going Open Source[ Go to top ]

    Sun also said that if something runs faster in Linux than it does on Solaris x86, they will treat it as a bug in Solaris and fix it.
  10. SlowLaris Going Open Source[ Go to top ]

    Sun also claimed that they see the industry coming back full circlt to the big monolithic machines with many CPUs versus the smaller number of CPU horizontal handware scaling with blades. Only time will tell if they are correct in that claim.
    The stess test that I run on my web show IO DB cching controller to be the slow part. Not the CPU.

    .V
  11. Why Open Source[ Go to top ]

    We had a linux server which is proxy server. And had a partime admin. SSH is open for remote admin. There was some buffer over flow in SSH and patch was not applied.
    System was cracked and we didnot know about that for 15days(since there is no regular maintenance).
    After we found out that it was cracked, first look did not reveal any unknown processes(we used 'ps' and related commands). No Newly created files (ls and related cmds).But closer look at proc file system revealed all the processes that were running.

    The point I want to say is a small vulnerability can lead to deadly consequences.
    If this is a closed source it wouldn't be that easy to replace ps ls.. commands, erase logs and change their modified times.
    If the person who cracked is good enough, he could have done more damage by staying on the sysem by modifying system calls. You could Never Ever know that you are cracked.
  12. Even the best safes...[ Go to top ]

    Can be robbed if they are left open.

    1. You make me think you were allowing SSH version 1 connections (which isn't very secure). Need to turn that off and allow only version 2.
    2. Never, ever have any program that can compile code for any language on a machine connected to the internet.
    3. If an attacker gains root access to ANY Unix machine of any kind, it is not difficult to start changing commands, and especially logs. A lot of the commercial variants of Unix use either GNU or BSD userland tools.

    The point I'm trying to make is twofold.

    1. Don't blame an operating system for poor security practices (like not keeping the machine up-to-date. Get a commercial distribution that will help you manage patches or use Debian or even Gentoo -- they can both auto-update).
    2. Give me root access on a Solaris box, I will make ps & ls do whatever I want and change any log I care to. No problem. It would be infeasable for me to change the Solaris kernel, of course, but the userland tools are fair game.

    Next time, use an intrusion detection system (like tripwire) -- which will set off all kinds of alarms when an attacker starts changing things.