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News: OOPSLA 2004 Coverage

  1. OOPSLA 2004 Coverage (8 messages)

    OOPSLA 2004 is going on this week, and there has been quite a bit of coverage from the blog world. Although this conference has traditionally heavy on the academic side, this year it has a good share of real world technology. For example, there are more talks on Java and .NET technologies than LISP and Squeak :)


    Daniel Steinberg: OOPSLA 2004, and Alan Kay keynotes

    Keith Short: Report from OOPSLA

    On Ward Cunningham: Father of the Wiki Talks Programming Practices

    What have you heard that was interesting, by way of OOPSLA?

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. OOPSLA 2004 Coverage[ Go to top ]

    I'm not quite baffled that OOPSLA '04 is extremely SOA centric, but it's hardly much hardcore OO stuff left. OOPSLA used to be about just that. Hardcore 00 stuff.

    Some presentations (especially that by Microsoft) comes across as pure product announcements. Yikes.
  3. I'm not quite baffled that OOPSLA '04 is extremely SOA centric, but it's hardly much hardcore OO stuff left. OOPSLA used to be about just that. Hardcore 00 stuff.

    Objects are passe, having long since been upstaged by components. Likewise, services now replace components as the primary abstraction for the enterprise.
  4. nonsence[ Go to top ]

    Wrong!
    Components are made of objects, so objects are not passe if you're building components you care about objects, likewise services are a collection of components...
  5. nonsence[ Go to top ]

    Wrong!Components are made of objects, so objects are not passe if you're building components you care about objects, likewise services are a collection of components...

    According to purist components are independant of objects and objects are not an absolute requirment! Just my 2 cents on the topic..

    BTW if you think closely service oriented architecture is more closer to procedural appraoch than OO.
  6. Brian claimed:
    Objects are passe

    I beg to differ. SOA is basically a marketing construction. At the end of the day, it's just another application of OO, except that you have lost 50% of the expressive power and performance of doing it in a pure OO environment.

    SOA will hopefully die the moment the industry starts to hire sane engineers again.
  7. That's the problem in a nutshell[ Go to top ]

    OOPSLA has been more focused on Java than Lisp and Smalltalk for a number of years now; that's nothing new. It is, however, a big problem. There are plenty of conferences and other events that focus on Java. Deep, advanced research that's well outside the mainstream is what OOPSLA used to be known for, and that's sadly lacking now.

    Not that I think the conference should be strictly academic, or that hardcore research directed at Java is unimportant. But our industry needs a lively, active forum for research that goes beyond the current status quo.
  8. nice variety of topics[ Go to top ]

    Not that I think the conference should be strictly academic, or that hardcore research directed at Java is unimportant. But our industry needs a lively, active forum for research that goes beyond the current status quo.

    AS an attendee I thought that Oopsla was a great mix of academic, industry and far out forward looking ideas. In fact, there was a conference 'track' with each of those notions as a focus. Not many conferences have a keynote about alien technologies from the year 2308..
  9. Heavy on academic side?[ Go to top ]

    I have attended OOPSLA for 9 years now and I found that there is an amazing amount of real world, directly applicable, topics presented at OOPSLA.

    Yes, the proceedings are fairly research oriented, but that's only one part of the conference. Practitioners panels, design workshops, tutorials,... are very far from being 'academic'.

    Attending OOPSLA, I have seen the birth of Wiki, Design Patterns, AOP, ... (and yes Squeak).

    I am reading TSS regularly and trust the posters comments, but in this case I know quite well the 'subject' and I now wonder about the veracity of the other announcements...

    Thierry Thelliez