Discussions

News: J2EE for Beginners: EJOSA Revolutions 2.2 Released

  1. Lofi Dewanto wrote:

    "The bane of many a J2EE novice has been the complexity associated with developing J2EE applications, using servlets and EJBs. Many commercial J2EE products that tried to address this problem failed either because their products were cluttered with features that overwhelmed J2EE beginners or simply because they failed to contribute to the explanation of the underlying development process itself.

    The Enterprise Java Open Source Architecture (EJOSA) Template was built to help computer science students, at the University of Munster, develop J2EE projects with a low learning curve. With little to no experience in J2EE, and a modest experience in Java, students were able to use the EJOSA template to create robust and production-ready J2EE projects. In the first part of this article, EJOSA architect Lofi Dewanto takes a close look at this magic template -- Enhydra (Web container), JOnAS (EJB container) and HypersonicSQL (data container for development) or Firebird DBMS (data container for production)."

    See: http://www.objectweb.org/phorum/read.php?admview=1&f=29&i=10171&t=10171

    http://www.jaxmagazine.com/itr/online_artikel/psecom,id,653,nodeid,147.html

    http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/ejosa/ejosa-revo2.2-doc.pdf?download
  2. Beginners have to know all these open source containers are not used a lot in the real world.
    They would better spend time learning Struts, Spring, and Hibernate.
    For app servers, Websphere and Weblogic are the most common ones.
    This kind of skills will interest companies when seeking a job.
  3. <quote>
    They would better spend time learning Struts, Spring, and Hibernate.
    </quote>

    This article is the part one. In the part two I'll show all the possibilities for "presentation" and "business" implementation technologies.

    The most important point for all the beginners is actually learning standards and specifications. Through such standards and specifications (EJB, Servlet, J2EE, ...) it is possible to learn the "concepts" without beeing dependent on the "products". And here lies the power of J2EE spec. and Java in general (JCP).

    <quote>
    For app servers, Websphere and Weblogic are the most common ones.
    </quote>

    Many of us forget to understand the concept behind the products. Using products like Websphere and Weblogic with all their "easy to use" wizards, assistants and administrator consoles, won't help me to understand the concept behind the products.

    <quote>
    This kind of skills will interest companies when seeking a job.
    </quote>

    You cannot prepare them to be able to use all the products available on the market. So, the solution is to let them understand the "concepts" and not the products!
    If you understand the concepts you can extend your knowledge to understand the products but not another way around.

    Regards,
    Lofi.
  4. The second part of the EJOSA article is online:

    Delving into EJOSA - Part II - A Look into the Architecture and Development Process using the Magic Template.
    by Blasius Lofi Dewanto.

    The first part of this series introduced us to the EJOSA magic template - a solution for J2EE beginners who wish to overcome the complexity of J2EE application development by using Open Source Software (OSS). In the second part of this series, we will move further into the workings of EJOSA Template and look at the specification directory, which is the most important part of EJOSA Template; the business layer, where you implement the specification with available Java technologies; the presentation layer that represents the view of the business logics; and the road ahead for the EJOSA Template.

    Read part II at:
    http://www.jaxmagazine.com/itr/online_artikel/psecom,id,671,nodeid,147.html

    Part I:
    http://www.jaxmagazine.com/itr/online_artikel/psecom,id,653,nodeid,147.html

    Have fun!
    Lofi.