Discussions

News: Apache XML-RPC 2.0 released

  1. Apache XML-RPC 2.0 released (10 messages)

    Apache has released the 2.0 version of their XML-RPC library for download. One notable change is the ability to select an HTTP implementation, but the team claims that the most important change is "that the current version will hopefully receive active maintenance, which the previous didn't in the last one or two years."

    Are you using XML-RPC? What about its technical merits drove that decision? What other factors do you think service authors should consider, when looking at implementation choices? How do you feel about the announcement that the product will hopefully receive active maintenance?

    Threaded Messages (10)

  2. Long life to XML-RPC[ Go to top ]

    I think XML-RPC is the easiest way to export simple functionality to foreign systems in a matter of minutes; it's quite clean and not over-engineered. There are lots of implementations for lots of systems and environments, so it's really easy to work with it.

    I've found Apache XML-RPC to be so fast to use and deploy that I've become really lazy when I have to use other kind of web-services like SOAP. Its embedded http server works very well and for simple deployments it's very useful not having to install a full servlet container just to export some methods to the world.
  3. Long life to XML-RPC[ Go to top ]

    As long as you use readonly services. Once you venture into services that need to participate in transactions, life gets complicated.

    Apart from REST, with which I'm not familiar, there's no simple web services standard today...shame for us IT guys eh? ;-)
  4. Long life to XML-RPC[ Go to top ]

    As long as you use readonly services. Once you venture into services that need to participate in transactions, life gets complicated.Apart from REST, with which I'm not familiar, there's no simple web services standard today...shame for us IT guys eh? ;-)

    How about Hessian? It's simple and fast for what I've tested and as far as I know it can participate in transactions using a simple feature called headers. It's explained somewhere in its web site.
  5. Long life to XML-RPC[ Go to top ]

    As long as you use readonly services. Once you venture into services that need to participate in transactions, life gets complicated.Apart from REST, with which I'm not familiar, there's no simple web services standard today...shame for us IT guys eh? ;-)
    How about Hessian? It's simple and fast for what I've tested and as far as I know it can participate in transactions using a simple feature called headers. It's explained somewhere in its web site.
    Hessian is much faster than any XML-RPC implementation I've tried. But unfortunately Hessian has not as many implementations as XML-RPC. Go www.xml-rpc.com/ and click on implementations... you'll see that there's available a xml-rpc for *lots* of different systems.
  6. Long life to XML-RPC[ Go to top ]

    Yep, the list of XML-RPC implementations is extensive.
    So far Hessian has been ported to Java, PHP, Python, C++, C# and Ruby. I heard that there is a Flash version on the way.
  7. Re:[ Go to top ]

    Of course XML-RPC is not oriented to export multi-table multi-database multi-system transactional methods, but what's wrong with simple transactions or queries being done throught XML-RPC? What's wrong with exporting easy to use facades through simplified technologies like this?

    Of course I wouldn't engineer a full SOA part of a critical BSS on this technology, but when you need to export simple methods between highly decoupled systems which are almost out of the main enterprise data processing flows, or publish simplified easy-to-use interfaces to third parties, I think the full SOAP stack with WS-E stuff is a complete overkill, and XML-RPC solves the problem nicely, cleanly and easily.
  8. I have not seen any information regarding this in ws.apache.org. can you please direct me to correct link ?
  9. It's not "big news" as much as it's "news." The links in the article are correct.
  10. XML-RPC & Ajax[ Go to top ]

    I posted an entry on Java.net about using XML-RPC with Ajax, you can read it here. It may be a bit heavy for some use cases, but it could be used to solve some interesting problems and also shows how XML-RPC can be used to hook up disparate systems very quickly and cheaply.
  11. AXIS?[ Go to top ]

    Is this a replacement for Apache Axis?