JBoss releases new BPM engine, absorbs Drools

Discussions

News: JBoss releases new BPM engine, absorbs Drools

  1. JBoss releases new BPM engine, absorbs Drools (18 messages)

    JBoss today released jBPM 3.0, complete with new BPEL functionality for Web services integration. The persistence of the API has been decoupled from the workflow operations as well.
    The addition of BPEL provides for easier Web services integration for the jBPM product, though Connolly was quick to point out that it should not be viewed as just a BPEL offering.

    "BPEL is designed to orchestrate Web services," he said. "It's good for integration, not for deeper business logic. We don't view BPEL as the be-all and end-all."

    For that deeper business logic, JBoss has its own Java-based process definition language.
    The Drools project and its lead developer Mark Proctor have also joined JBoss. Drools will provide the business rules functionality for the company's service-oriented architecture platform, with specific plans to fold it inside the company's enterprise service bus release slated for late in 2006.

    Threaded Messages (18)

  2. What does Peter think?[ Go to top ]

    What does Peter Lin think about this?

    How about Iterion and the other commercial sponsors of Drools?

    Does JBoss plan on changing Drools liberal license? If so, how?
  3. Great![ Go to top ]

    What does Peter Lin think about this?How about Iterion and the other commercial sponsors of Drools?

    Does JBoss plan on changing Drools liberal license? If so, how?

    I already told Mark congrats. I know a few guys at JBoss, so it's all good to me. In terms of BPEL and other "standards", I for one don't really care. Drools will remain apache style license, so no one should be concerned. I'm not going to bother getting a JBoss debate, since I have no problems with the licensing.

    peter
  4. Wow ! That is unexpected and quite exciting news.
    I'm glad that "Professional OpenSource" vision of JBoss has such intresting behaviour.
    They are buying some of the best Open Sourse projects, starting with Hibernate and now Drools.
    This gives hope for good opensourse producs that they will be backed up by money and allow their developers spend their full time on work they love.
  5. Wow ! Just 4 days ago I posted here a comment regarding JBoss picking up best of OpenSource products, hiring their developers for full time work, and here JBoss does it again !
    This time NHibernate - dotnet port of Hibernate, joins JBoss, and NHibernate developers are hired by JBoss to continue to work on it full time !!
    As a current user of NHibernate I'm happy to hear that news !
  6. Good. I've used NHibernate on a few projects (and will in the future) and really like it. According to the NHibernate forum, they will be looking at porting Hiberante 3.0 functionality.
  7. Sorry for all JBoss lovers.. and java geeks.. but it is impossible to continue to associate JBoss and Open Source.. JBoss is a company.. that work Open source on its own.. who never want to collaborate to set the standards.. I mean the door is just closed !! then because it's business model start to fail, then've decided to add a bunch of Open Source related technologies... to their offer... so that they hope make more money on support, docs... etc.. nobody does it now... but What is their vision for entreprise computing..??? even IBM has a vision... so...
  8. I used Drools on my last project to write a custom JSF Navigation Handler (a very customized web flow based on b-rules). I really enjoyed working with Drools.

    I wonder why the author of this post choose the word absorbs instead of joins.

    If Drools became an Apache project, do you think he would have said absorbs?

    MyFaces joins Apache.
    But,
    JBoss absorbs Drools.

    (Fair and balanced?)

    Mark Proctor gets a full time job that allows him to work on Drools full time. This is a big win for the community.
     
    JBoss provides service and value to the Java community by having experts like Gavin, Mark et al working on OS projects. This is a good thing. I like the fact that they are keeping the Apache style lic.
  9. I wonder why the author of this post choose the word absorbs instead of joins.If Drools became an Apache project, do you think he would have said absorbs?MyFaces joins Apache.But, JBoss absorbs Drools.(Fair and balanced?)

    I think its a play-on-words... sponge -> absorb -> drool.

    oooooor, it was just the National Enquirer... er... TSS trying to be cutesy.

    STAY METAL!
    Roy Russo
  10. See title of this comment ;-)

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol Coherence: The Java Data Grid
  11. No mastication ?

    John Mettraux
    http://www.openwfe.org
  12. See title of this comment ;-)Peace,Cameron PurdyTangosol Coherence: The Java Data Grid

    boy that sounds tastey. what's the old saying, "you can pick your friends, you can pick your nose, but you can't pick your friend's nose."

    excuse my stupid joke

    peter
  13. See title of this comment ;-)

    lol

    I was trying to convince Proctor to change the name to "JBoss Rules!", but I think he's sticking with the original name.

    I thought "JBoss Rules!" was more fitting... well... cos we do. ;-)

    STAY METAL!
    Roy Russo
  14. The branded name for the Q1 2006 release is still undecided.
  15. See title of this comment ;-)Peace,Cameron PurdyTangosol Coherence: The Java Data Grid

    The first time I read this I was waiting for WebSphere portal server to boot up so I was just scanning things. I did not get the joke.

    Now I am home (Tucson AZ), and I get what you are saying.

    Too funny. :o)

    --Rick Hightower
  16. analysts[ Go to top ]

    The searchwebservices.com article refered to in this posting cites "Steve Garone, an analyst with Ideas International Inc" with the epochal words "As we get into enterprises, which is certainly where JBoss is heading" and further down "You're not going to win based on the fact that you're open source [..] everyone's starting to look the same".

    How can you not get frustrated with statements like this, which are so superficial, over-simplifying and partially simply wrong (in which way does WebLogic "look the same" as JBoss as pertains to open source??) that they do more harm than good?! Especially as they have the power to seriously mislead those who only feed on these analyst reports (who will go away with the message that "JBoss is somehow heading into enterprises, but it really doesn't matter, because it's all the same.)

      sigh,
      gerald
  17. Congrats[ Go to top ]

    Congrats Mark! I'm very excited for you and for Drools!

    -Brian
  18. Clarification[ Go to top ]

    I've had many people asking me to clarify the situation with Drools and JBoss, so I decided to blog it - http://blogs.codehaus.org/people/mproctor/archives/001192_drools_joins_jboss.html - the contents of which are pasted below for convenience. Enjoy.

    The Drools move to JBoss really is a good thing for everyone, with no down sides, key Drools developers were consulted throughout the process and all are more than happy with the situation.

    Rule engines are a specialised field, this is recognised by JBoss, and they trust us as the experts so we retain full control of development. I now get to work full time on Drools and we will hopefully be hiring another full time Drools developer. Bob McWhirter will continue to be involved in Drools, in an official JBoss capacity under a part time basis, as he continues to have other responsibilities. This will really accelerate the development process; which benefits everyone.

    Drools will continue to work as a standalone product, as part of the JBoss JEMS stack. We will of course work on great JBoss AS integration, especially with jBPM - however we will continue to fully support other AS. I want Drools to be used absolutely everywhere and will do everything I can to achieve this; I want NO artificial barriers to adoption - this has always been important to me and the main reason for not going LGPL. The license will stay BSDish, although we may change it to a standardised BSD/ASF/MIT license – this has been planned for a while and will help to avoid confusion.

    Now that Drools is part of JBoss we can work on strong jBPM integration. We will bring standardised and easily understandable solutions to Workflow/BPM and Business Rules integration to the masses. I have already met with Tom Baeyens and we have identified some initial areas to work on for our first product release in Q1 2006. This is exciting work and will provide new ways of being able to build better affordable solutions without the high costs of existing specialised systems.

    On a more personal note neither I nor Bob McWhirter are corporate type people, in fact Bob is famous for it!!! I would not have joined JBoss without full autonomy in an environment that would fully support my vision and the Drools community. We expected JBoss to take bully boy tactics in negotiations; however they were quite the contrary - this was unexpected and very refreshing and one of the key factors in my decision. Throughout the entire process they were surprisingly flexible; they listened to all our concerns and responded supportively - this was especially demonstrated in licensing talks, I hope the community takes note of that. While JBoss would have liked us to LGPL they respected our reasoning and never put any undue pressure on us. Since joining I have been continually asked about community feedback and response from all key JBoss people, Marc Fleury has taken a personal interest in this and repeatedly asked me if there is anything more he can do. This concern has been truly genuine and very much appreciated by me. Luckily the response has been great; we have had overwhelmingly positive feedback, especially once we clarified the licensing.

    It would take 24+ months for a small company without an existing track record or infrastructure to try and build a strong brand around Drools, with all the support/consultancy/training/partner infrastructure that is needed for enterprise systems - this is a huge risk and one that I and Iterion were very much aware of. With JBoss we can achieve these in 6 months to a far greater effect, with negligible risk; as JBoss depends heavily on partners this will result in a larger ROI, due to scaling, with far less risk for them.
  19. Where can I download this version? I cannot find in the Sourceforge repo.