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News: Sapia Releases Corus 1.1.5, centralized control of distributed apps

  1. Sapia has released Corus 1.1.5, a framework allowing centralized control of distributed application processes in a cluster-like fashion. With Corus, you can deploy plain-vanilla Java apps on a large-scale, without an application server. The rationale behind Corus is that one should not need to rely on application servers to distribute applications on a large scale. Corus consists of a lightweight daemon implemented in Java. A Corus server is installed on a given host, and executes/monitors processes on that host. Multiple Corus daemons are grouped by domain, which allows performing clustered application deployment and process execution. At a glance, Corus features:
    • Centralized, remote, replicated application deployment/undeployment across multiple hosts.
    • Centralized, remote, replicated execution/termination of application processes across multiple hosts.
    • Monitoring of running processes to detect crashes (and restart crashed processes automatically).
    • Replicated, JNDI-compliant naming service: based on Sapia's Ubik distributed computing framework (guaranteeing fail-over and load-balancing), the naming service can be used by deployed Java applications.
    • Allows centralized distribution of «standard» Java applications (Java classes with a main method), and remote control of corresponding JVMs.
    • Allows multiple Java applications per-JVM, through the use of Magnet, which allows start-up parameters and logic to be configured using XML. Magnet attempts to brings to the run-time what Ant brought to the build-time.
    • Free with an Apache business-friendly license.
  2. Very interesting. How does this compare with other MOM deamons such as Tibco RVD, other than the part that it is implemented by Java?
  3. Very interesting. How does this compare with other MOM deamons such as Tibco RVD, other than the part that it is implemented by Java?
    Corus is not MOM software. In the Java context, it is used to start/stop JVMs distributed on multiple hosts, in a centralized manner. Corus makes no assumptions as to how these processes might interoperate, although it offers a (non-mandatory) distributed computing facility.
  4. grid software?[ Go to top ]

    just out of interest: the first term that springs to my mind when i read something like this is "grid". any particular reason why you chose not to include that buzzword in your description? just curious, gerald http://www.gerald-loeffler.net
  5. Re: grid software?[ Go to top ]

    just out of interest: the first term that springs to my mind when i read something like this is "grid". any particular reason why you chose not to include that buzzword in your description?

    just curious,
    gerald

    http://www.gerald-loeffler.net
    Well, grid computing involves a bit more than what Corus offers. But in a way you're right: Corus could be used as a very solid basis for building a grid infrastructure.
  6. Re: grid software?[ Go to top ]

    grid computing involves a bit more than what Corus offers
    so it is good old-fashioned modesty and honesty that keeps you from calling it grid software?! that's without precedence in IT ;-)