Article on the AjaxParts Taglib from Java Web Parts

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News: Article on the AjaxParts Taglib from Java Web Parts

  1. In his article titled "The AjaxParts Taglib from Java Web Parts: AJAX for Java Developers the Easy (yet powerful) Way!", Frank W. Zammetti introduces the AjaxParts Taglib (APT), a component of the Java Web Parts Project (JWP). APT is a taglib that allows for declarative, event-driven Ajax, allowing a developer to add Ajax capabilities to existing or new Web applications without the need to write JavaScript. His article demonstrates how APT works, explains benefits and goes into detail about the capabilities offered out-of-the-box. He also explains ways in which it can be extended to fulfill more advanced users.
    APT is one of those libraries focused exclusively on Ajax. What makes APT different to a large extent from the libraries named above, and nearly every other Ajax library out there, is that it is geared specifically towards Java developers because it is implemented as a custom taglib. This may sound limiting, since only those doing Java web development can use APT, but we prefer to keep the focus narrow to ensure the result is as effective as it can be. What this allows for is AJAX without any coding, without any need to know JavaScript, or how client-side development works. APT takes a declarative, event-driven approach to AJAX, something else which separates it from the rest (the declarative nature at least; there are other event-driven libraries out there). Using APT you can get into the AJAX game without writing a bit of JavaScript yourself! All it takes is a few new tags in your pages (two that are used all the time, two others not as much) and some XML configuration. In addition, APT makes it child’s play to add AJAX functionality to existing web applications without modifying them in any significant way. APT handles all the sticky cross-browser issues for you, as any AJAX library should do. It also deals with simultaneous requests by assuring that they will always complete and not step on each others’ data (even if they were to the same URL and used all the same data, they will still be handled completely independent of one another).
    From your experiences with Ajax libraries, how would you compare APT to others?
  2. What makes APT different to a large extent from the libraries named above, and nearly every other Ajax library out there, is that it is geared specifically towards Java developers because it is implemented as a custom taglib.
    That is funny. All the Ajax tools for JSP developers I saw are custom JSP taglibs. It is absolutely natural just because the taglibs are the portable way to distribute code among J2EE containers. Try to google 'Ajax taglibs' for example Dmitry Yet another Ajax taglib :-)