Optaros' Open Source Catalog and OSS Java Projects

Discussions

News: Optaros' Open Source Catalog and OSS Java Projects

  1. If you haven't yet seen the recently-released "Open Source Catalogue" (which requires registration) it's definitely worth your time - it's a grid comparing different open source projects in various topic areas, with some introductory text describing the report methodology and an attempt to describe what is happening with open source software.
    Optaros' Open Source Catalogue 2007 lists some 260 "projects" in four software categories (operating systems and infrastructure, application development and infrastructure, infrastructure solutions and business applications). The selection and the rating system is based on the experience of Optaros' worldwide consulting and integration work force, substantial research and evaluations, as well as interaction with open source communities and companies. At the end of the day, the selection and evaluation will always be somewhat subjective, even when the analysis and the decisions were made as objectively as possible. However, we are convinced that it is the experience and the implementation knowledge of Optaros' consultants as well as the pragmatic approach in compiling the data that will make this catalogue a very useful tool when thinking about alternatives to existing technologies or starting a new implementation project and identifying suitable frameworks or solutions. The Open Source Catalogue is not intended to replace detailed evaluation or proof of concepts, but provide some help to conduct a first selection.
    A couple of points:
    • Aside from the obvious quibbles (what does "enterprise-readiness" mean anyway?) it's interesting to see how OSS Java projects continue to grow and flourish - remember when "open source Java" was an oxymoron?
    • Hibernate, JBoss, Tomcat and Eclipse are OSS standard bearers in their respective areas. [Editor's note: It's also interesting that no application server got more than three out of four points for maturity. I wonder why, since some of the application servers have been around virtually forever?]
    • The report corroborates the economic arguments I made in "There Is No Open Source Community."
    -John Mark http://www.hyperic.com/ Message was edited by: joeo@enigmastation.com
  2. If you haven't yet seen the recently-released (...) it's definitely worth your time
    It's a *very* superficial overview of the whole software space that maybe has typically 1, and sometimes as many as 2!, OSS projects in each "topic area". Hardly "comparing different open source projects in various topic areas".
  3. But I like the fact that somebody took up the initiative. You're right, though, I'd like to see someone take this up and make it into a real community project. I believe SpikeSource tried something like that with their "business readiness rating" but I don't think that ever really took off. -John Mark http://www.hyperic.com/
  4. Re: true, it's not comprehensive[ Go to top ]

    http://www.java-source.net/
  5. I completely agree with others that the whole exercise lacks depth and breadth..But, still I would like to complement them for the effort. It would have been nice to know the details of the evaluations and the factors considered... Following areas are missing completely - ESB (Servicemix, Mule, Cletix etc) - BPM ( No mention of Intalio, jBPM and others) - Rabi Mishra http://rabisblog.blogspot.com

  6. Following areas are missing completely

    - ESB (Servicemix, Mule, Cletix etc)
    - BPM ( No mention of Intalio, jBPM and others)

    - Rabi Mishra
    http://rabisblog.blogspot.com
    Both areas are available in the document, see Business Process and Workflow Management and SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) chapters. BTW, we are currently working (at Bull) in a similar document (in fact it will be a web site) which go in details on each project to be compared. We will let you know when this review is finished. Regards, Miguel Bonita Project Leader (http://bonita.objectweb.org)
  7. As friendly as some of these alternatives may be originally, I think providing 'IT decision makers' with a dumbed down list of pre-selected choices is not a good thing. The open source software market, even though in some areas choice is more abundant than some people like, is pretty transparent if you take the time to investigate it. The main guarantee you'll get with Spikesource/ Optaros/ etc is that they will recommend the most popular projects in their fields. Which does not always relate to their actual quality.
  8. As friendly as some of these alternatives may be originally, I think providing 'IT decision makers' with a dumbed down list of pre-selected choices is not a good thing. The open source software market, even though in some areas choice is more abundant than some people like, is pretty transparent if you take the time to investigate it. The main guarantee you'll get with Spikesource/ Optaros/ etc is that they will recommend the most popular projects in their fields. Which does not always relate to their actual quality.
    I'm actually being to negative. If a company has an honest focus on the technology and the client's best interest, and won't only go for the obvious/ easiest answers, there might be something to it.
  9. I wonder why there is no mention about open source Ajax toolkits like Google Web Toolkit (GWT) and Yahoo User Interface Library (YUI)!