Discussions

News: Clustered Drupal through Quercus, Terracotta and Ehcache

  1. Geert Bevin has posted a blog detailing how he used Java to improve the scalability of Drupal - a PHP CMS - by using JVM-level clustering. It's an interesting technology mashup, as it were, using Java, Terracotta DSO, and PHP in the same application. To be entirely clear, Geert is an employee of Terracotta, so the entry is definitely aimed at showing off the capabilities of DSO, but it's so unexpected that it merits looking into. It's also not a new thing to mix different languages like this. Cold Fusion is implemented with Java (BlueDragon, Smith, and IIRC Macromedia's Cold Fusion itself is done with Java now), and the PHP engine in use in the example is Caucho's Quercus - also not a new product. That said, the extension point here is novel. What do you think? Should Java programmers aim themselves more at being polyglot programmers, as Neal Ford has said?

    Threaded Messages (6)

  2. Java modules for Quercus/PHP5[ Go to top ]

    One of the most exciting features of Quercus is, IMO, the ability to write modules for Quercus/PHP5 in java - biz logic in java and presentation logic in PHP: wonderful! But, as long as Quercus is GPL and I have to import com.caucho.quercus.module.AbstractQuercusModule to write a module all of my code will have to be released under the GPL! Maybe this is kind of preventing users from adopting quercus more widely... and that's a pity because it seems a really good thing. I'd suggest to release the code needed to develop modules under the Lesser GPL (hey, that's the good one for libraries, isn't it?) Quite interesting experiment, anyhow. Regards, Raffaele
  3. GPL[ Go to top ]

    Hi Raffaele, I think that the GPL only comes into play when you actually distribute your software. If you're just building solutions and install them internally or for a customer, then you don't need to release your code under GPL. That's how I always understood it. Anyway, of course, that could make it a problem when you build a sellable product, but in many other cases the fact that it's GPL doesn't really matter, imho. Take care, Geert
  4. Re: GPL[ Go to top ]

    Sorry but even if you use it internally you'll have to release the source (obbiously you might keep it secret so that noone will ever sue you, but then a webapp is not the best option...) look here for a milestone case about GPL: http://www.jinchess.com/ichessu/ -Simone
  5. Re: GPL[ Go to top ]

    Sorry but even if you use it internally you'll have to release the source (obbiously you might keep it secret so that noone will ever sue you, but then a webapp is not the best option...)

    look here for a milestone case about GPL: http://www.jinchess.com/ichessu/

    -Simone
    Here is an excerpt from the GPL FAQ page:
    Does the GPL require that source code of modified versions be posted to the public? The GPL does not require you to release your modified version. You are free to make modifications and use them privately, without ever releasing them. This applies to organizations (including companies), too; an organization can make a modified version and use it internally without ever releasing it outside the organization. But if you release the modified version to the public in some way, the GPL requires you to make the modified source code available to the program's users, under the GPL. Thus, the GPL gives permission to release the modified program in certain ways, and not in other ways; but the decision of whether to release it is up to you.
    That to me seems to be saying pretty clearly that you are not obliged to release the code if you use it internally. GPL FAQ here: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#GPLRequireSourcePostedPublic
  6. Re: GPL[ Go to top ]

    [...] you are not obliged to release the code if you use it internally.
    I know that but - who cares? You make money selling software and consultancy or services based on software development. Companies don't like GPL. Companies have money, without money nobody is going to work (professionally) on that software. Quercus is not generally known and used mostly for this reason, I guess. And it's a pity. I suggest - again - to release the libraries required to develop java modules for PHP under the LGPL to ease and widen the adoption of this amazing product. This would be a good commercial move for Caucho
  7. Re: GPL[ Go to top ]

    If you're just building solutions and install them internally or for a customer, then you don't need to release your code under GPL.
    Geert. Careful there. The situation with GPL and consultants/contractors is quite difficult. Here is one clearer-than-average description: "Distribution by/to Independent Contractors. The GPL could be problematic for independent contractors. U.S. copyright law deems work by independent contractors not to be "work for hire" unless the parties expressly agree in writing that the work will be considered a work made for hire. Independent contractors who retain copyright ownership in their work and install it on customers' or end users' computers invoke the distribution clause and may be required to release their work under the GPL, or at least be required to permit others to do so. Thus, the independent contractor may find himself trapped between a rock and a hard place if he needs to maintain proprietary control over the code. Agreeing that the project is "work for hire" means losing ownership rights in relation to the hiring company; but choosing to retain his copyrights may result in losing his proprietary rights to the software." Source: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/38728.html /Henri Karapuu