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News: Dell to launch first Google Android-based phone

  1. Dell to launch first Google Android-based phone (7 messages)

    PC Pro magazine has posted a short news item, "Dell to launch first Googlephone?," in which a rumor of an Android-based phone from Dell will be produced. No word on which carriers might support it, pricing, or other features - although Android itself would be a heck of a feature. If true, this phone would be a killer - provided the pricing is workable. Android allows applications written in Java to be deployed on phones, with a clear API - according to the SDK, which is only an early release so far. (Android isn't referred to as being in an early release stage, but the SDK is.) Such a phone, with proper carrier support, might be the lever needed to make Java development on mobile devices very, very popular. Also see: "Google and Dell tipped to reveal iPhone rival plans" from MarketingWeek.com, referred to by PC Pro's article.
  2. This is great, this would spice up the mobile computing market and competition for the mobile hardware and software. Earlier HTC was supposed to be the first one to come out with Android powered phones. To get some more idea about Android refer to the introduction and sample application . Android is already being termed as the disruptive technology for the mobile software space. Vikas Hazrati http://vikashazrati.wordpress.com
  3. This is really something to watch, this should start to open up the mobile phone technologies into the OS market. I bought a SavaJe phone at JavaOne '06 but they had hopeless support. It was a good Java phone but without support and updates I gave up, it now sits with my large collection of mobile phones dating back to 26oz (735g) 1989 Motorola 8500x. Today I walk around with my hacked iPhone and the Nokia E90, the former as my favourite phone and the latter as an excellent HSDPA bluetooth modem, HSDPA is the 3.5G network we have in Europe giving 7.2meg data. The Nokia is rather closed, there's an SDK for it and of course it runs Java but as usual it's J2ME. Today's phones are more powerful than the desktops we had when J2SE was into it's 4th year so I really don't see why we have to put up with J2ME these days. The mobile Java revolution will be when we see full J2SE on a phone, albeit an old version it will still make Java on mobile devices much easier. Before the iPhone, basically a pocket Mac, I used a Sharp Zaurus, an excellent pocket Linux device, slightly better then the iPhone but it lacked a phone in it, it had bluetooth and wifi through cards though. I love my iPhone, unhacked it's just a fancy phone but hacked it's almost a full Mac, I run an Apache web server on it with PHP and Ruby, I've got a terminal with SSH and I can hack Wifi with it which is great for free access in airports. So, roll on Android, an officially open phone an a community behind it will make a huge difference, I wonder if the iPhone hacking community will move over though, the iPhone is an attractive base to work on. It's funny Joe asked about carriers supporting it, outside of the US there's little concept of carrier and phones, Europe you get most phones for free with your contract and you have a choice of carriers with most phones and a choice of most phones with most carriers. The iPhone was an exception and it's been difficult to persuade the public to fork out money for a phone and yet more money for the contract especially as the contract is more expensive than most other phones. The vase majority of iPhone users I know in the UK (London) have bought then for $400 in the US, hacked them and use them in the UK with pay-as-you-go sims or their old contracts. I will be an early adopter of the Dell phone, I hope I'm not alone. -John-
  4. Today I walk around with my hacked iPhone and the Nokia E90, the former as my favourite phone and the latter as an excellent HSDPA bluetooth modem ..
    Hey John, I found a good comparison of the iPhone with the Nokia e70 .. check it out: http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=iphone Peace, Cameron Purdy Oracle Coherence: Data Grid for Java and .NET
  5. Hey John, I found a good comparison of the iPhone with the Nokia e70 .. check it out:
    http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=iphone

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Oracle Coherence: Data Grid for Java and .NET
    Hey Cam, funny :-). Mines an E90 though not an E70. Yes it's a large phone but it's like a 17" Macbook Pro compared to the new girly version they've just released. The E90 has just about every technical feature you could think of. It's sadly little use in the US given the 15 your old telco infrastructure there but in the rest of the world it's amazing to have broadband (7.2 meg) from your phone. It's quad-band, 800x352 screen, Java MIDP 2.0, Full qwerty keyboard (with backlight), for those that like phone cameras, 3.2mp with autofocus and video at 640x480 at 30 fps., VOIP, Wifi (802.11b and g), simultaneous voice and data at 3.6meg (synchronous), GPS and FM radio. The downside is that it's not sitting on OS-X and it doesn't have the sexy iPhone interface. In an ideal world I'd have the Nokia technical spec in an iPhone like package but with a full qwerty keyboard, the iPhone interface running Android on a Linux or OS-X OS. I'm looking forward to an Android phone, -John-
  6. Excellent news...[ Go to top ]

    Even though I would not call myself a Google fanboy, this is great news. Finally a phone platform you may actually be able to program something meaningful against without wading through a sea of device specific "extensions" (such as sound! On a PHONE!) and with a decent programming language and programming model. It might even get to the point that writing real software for a phone may become, well, enjoyable.
  7. Amazing to see that TSS does not have a reasonable spam filter. Look at the spam messages on this thread! Is someone listening!
  8. Finally taken care of! great!