Discussions

News: Jspresso Java RIA Framework 3.0.0

  1. Jspresso Java RIA Framework 3.0.0 (8 messages)

    The Jspresso team is proud to announce the immediate availability of the Jspresso Java RIA framework 3.0.0 release. Jspresso - http://www.jspresso.org - is a free and opensource framework dedicated to building RIAs that offer a desktop-like user experience. Among many improvements, one of the major features of this release is the native support of Adobe's Flex as a deployment option. All Jspresso-based applications will instantly run on the Flash plugin without a single, hand-written, line of MXML or ActionScript in their code base. Nor is there any GUI code generation involved. Jspresso relies on a generic Flex client engine that dialogs with the Jspresso Java backend through Adobe's BlazeDS using a generic set of GUI commands. This approach relieves the developer from the DTO pain you usually find in this type of applications while still leveraging the style and power of a Flex client-side and keeping the development server-centric. Last but not least, Jspresso applications, bootstrapped by a Maven archetype, build entirely in Maven and can be directly imported in Eclipse with full WTP support. The server stack remains unchanged (servlet / Spring / Hibernate) and all the previous frontend technologies remain fully supported.

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. too bad..[ Go to top ]

    Nice concept... but the demo is terrible, especially the swing one, the ui is slow, unresponsive and the interface poorly design Same for the flash app as well, didn't even bother with the Ajax demo nor even spend anymore time on it. I think you guys really need to polish the demo up properly. I know as a techie, I shouldn't pass judgment on the technical qualities of framework based on a lousy implementation, but come on, put some effort into the demo.
  3. edit[ Go to top ]

    I mean lousy implementation of the demo using the framework, not lousy implementation of the framework itself...
  4. Re: Too bad..[ Go to top ]

    Hi Steven, First of all, thank you for your comments. I really consider them as being a source for improving Jspresso, although I can't say I was very pleased ;-). Maybe you could help me further : 1/ "slow and unresponsive UI" : I think this is due to network latency. The server (1Gb RAM Debian box) is set-up in France and hosts the site, the maven repo, the SVN repo and Tomcat (with 128Mb max java heap) for the demo. This is all I can afford for the moment. Could you tell me where you launched the demo from ? and your ping time for www.jspresso.org ? Sadly, slightly higher rate of network round-trips (although I do work on it) is the price to pay to implement a real MVC that is network distributed (always keeps your server model in sync)... Do you have any recommandation for (free) inhouse testing of network caracteristics (like a WAN simulator)? I'm actually looking at linux tc (traffic simulator) to artificially play with the network latency. 2/ "interface poorly designed" : I must admit that I'm more an architect than a UI designer... Any suggestion on how to handle things differently ? The kind of recommandations could be : "use an acordion instead of menus to navigate the workspaces". BTW, note that the hand-written code for the demo application is approximately (formatted, comments included): - 800 lines of spring XML (I'm currently working on a custom schema to make things more compact) - 400 lines of Java code - 150 lines of resource bundle properties files (English + French translations). Jspresso can be extended so that the runtime generated GUI meets your requirements. But it actually needs more coding. As an alternative to a public reply, you can reach me at vvandens [at] jspresso [dot] org. Any other suggestion is greatly appreciated. Regards, Vincent
  5. Re: Too bad..[ Go to top ]

    Just a quick follow-up. I've succesfully setup "traffic control" to simulate a high latency WAN. For those of you who are interested here are the commands I used (on a virtual Ubuntu hardy linux box) : - "sudo tc qdisc add dev eth0 root netem latency 500ms" : sets the interface eth0 to simulate 500ms latency - "tc qdisc ls dev eth0" : lists the applied configurations on the eth0 interface - "sudo tc qdisc del dev eth0 root" : deletes the applied configurations on the eth0 interface With a 500ms network latency, the UI performance degrades noticeably. To be complete, the Ajax library Jspresso uses for the Ajax frontend (WingS) makes heavy usage of nested HTML tables; and there is a known bug in firefox 3.0.x (https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=438509) that introduces a huge performance regression on such cases. It is fixed in FF 3.5 that is due mid 2009. Regards, Vincent
  6. I've done RIA's in OpenLaszlo and ZK. I think you need an app that demostrates all the widgets similar to ZK's http://www.zkoss.org/zkdemo/userguide/#f1 and OpenLaszlo's http://www.openlaszlo.org/lps4.2/laszlo-explorer/index.jsp?navset=nav10.xml&bookmark=Introduction & http://www.openlaszlo.org/lps4.2/examples/components/component_sampler.lzx The demos on your site are a bit paltry. Put something on the site that would make me, a 24 year programming veteran, want to dig deeper. I've done Java Swing, HTML, OpenLaszlo, & ZK. There's nothing on your site that says "WOW! This is cool. I'm going to spend time seeing how this is done." My 2 cents, Cary
  7. Hi Cary, Thanks for the comment; your 2 cents are valuable. Well, Jspresso actually differs from ZK and OpenLazlo in the way that it doesn't actually has its own UI components library; but it relies on 3d party UI libraries in an abstract way that offers various deployment options at runtime on a single and unmodified codebase (the various view factories create the views based on an assembly of java beans that are UI technology neutral). This way, Jspresso is not tied to a particular UI. Having said that, I think that your advice is really valuable since I can build an app that would demonstrate all the available UI assemblies (and other functionalities like security, validation, built-in actions, autocompletion, list of values, ...). Along with each of the demonstrated point, the app would show the underlying beans assembly. Reading the comments, I should have avoided the online demo. Still learning from pain ;-) Regards, Vincent
  8. Hi Cary,
    Thanks for the comment; your 2 cents are valuable.

    Well, Jspresso actually differs from ZK and OpenLazlo in the way that it doesn't actually has its own UI components library; but it relies on 3d party UI libraries in an abstract way that offers various deployment options at runtime on a single and unmodified codebase (the various view factories create the views based on an assembly of java beans that are UI technology neutral). This way, Jspresso is not tied to a particular UI.

    Having said that, I think that your advice is really valuable since I can build an app that would demonstrate all the available UI assemblies (and other functionalities like security, validation, built-in actions, autocompletion, list of values, ...). Along with each of the demonstrated point, the app would show the underlying beans assembly.

    Reading the comments, I should have avoided the online demo. Still learning from pain ;-)

    Regards,
    Vincent
    Pain is the way we learn, my friend ;-) I, for one, liked the online demo and experienced no performance problems ... and without an online demo of the product I would not have looked further. After all, if a developer can't use his own product, what good can it be? So I respect your courage putting it out there - I wish all businesses would do that. Anyway, for whatever it's worth, I'm impressed and will look in tonight to see if I can contribute. I definitely can use something better than OpenLazlo in this area in my view ...
  9. Ethan, You are my ray of light in these shady days ;-) Anyway, I definitely agree on reworking the demo. I've just begun the design of a Jspresso showcase as Cary suggested. I think it can really demonstrate the coverage of the framework (what I couldn't actually do on a tiny restricted business case). You are warmly welcome. Regards, Vincent