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News: Introducing the Google Chrome Operating System

  1. Called the Google Chrome Operating System, the new OS will be in netbooks for consumers in the second half of 2010. Read the blog post at http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/introducing-google-chrome-os.html.

    Threaded Messages (37)

  2. Called the Google Chrome Operating System, the new OS will be in netbooks for consumers in the second half of 2010
    Yawn.. I would have taken it seriously, but after seeing Chrome browser, I have lost the interest. There are some good points, but it's too much vapor ware than software. Thanks, I'll stick with Ubuntu and Firefox.
  3. +1
  4. Why it's interesting[ Go to top ]

    So far I see here (and elsewhere actually) a lot of "so what?" type responses. I don't think this is any sort of revolutionary concept, indeed there other examples of essentially the same thing, but it's interesting none the less for a couple of reasons. First, the obvious: It's Google. Like Microsoft, anything they do is significant because, whatever your feelings are about them, they are in many cases the ones that set direction for the rest of the industry. With as much clout as Google has, you've got to pay attention to what they're doing. The second reason is the more interesting though: this really *is not* just Chrome on top of Linux with a new windowing system (yes, that's what it is from a technical perspective, but that's not nearly the whole picture). This is fundamentally much more like Palm's webOS. When you write an app for webOS, or for gOS or whatever it's going to be called, you're writing a webapp. HTML, JavaScript and CSS (and some JavaScript APIs the "operating system" provides to interact with it). It's onceptually like Java in that regard... consider if a PC booted up into a JVM and all apps ran there (this too has been done)... there might be a Linux kernel or even Windows CE or something like that underneath the JVM, but that's the abstraction layer on top of the hardware that the JVM interacts with... the JVM *is* the operating system in that model effectively, just like Chrome effectively *is* the operating system in the gOS model, from the perspective of the applications running on it at least. What Google's doing isn't original; it's been done before. But, it's more interesting when they do it because of the weight they can put behind it. That and the fact that Chrome isn't a bad browser overall and will continue to get better. It's a neat concept that I don't think has been fully developed yet, certainly not by an industry heavyweight like Google. So, I'm interested to see where it goes. webOS similarly is very interesting and in fact I think down the road we could find more competition between Google and Palm than Google and Microsoft. All competitors have a *huge* hill to climb to cut down Microsoft's market share, but at least there's an interesting concept now that they're trying to do that with. All of this of course assumes too that you're onboard with the "web as application platform" model, and the "HTML/JavaScript/CSS" trinity as the basis for application development (plus maybe some plug-ins, I don't know what their plans are). If you're not then I doubt gOS will thrill you, ditto webOS. If you're already there though, or can be convinced, then I think you can start to see the benefits... if they do it right, you can run the same application on your gOS netbook, your Windows-based desktop or your iPhone, and your data lives in the ether (that assumes a lot, most notably that they don't tie this to Chrome specifically and port the APIs to other platforms). So yeah, I'd argue this *is* a big deal and could potentially be a game-changer... only time will tell if it is or not, or if it's just another interesting concept that doesn't really go anywhere. Palm has pretty much gambled their survival on the concept, now Google's going down the same road (minus the gambling their survival!), so let's see what happens.
  5. Re: Why it's interesting[ Go to top ]

    Just to clarify, since I seemingly contradicted myself... I said it's not a revolutionary concept, in the sense that it isn't really anything new. That doesn't mean it's not a big deal though, potentially anyway. It could wind up being a not at all revolutionary (read: new) concept and still be a big, game-changing outcome.
  6. Re: Why it's interesting[ Go to top ]

    +1 Doesn't have to be a revolutionary concept for it to have a large impact. I'm definitely excited about it.
  7. An interesting attempt, but I would be surprised if this is really going anywhere. Google is a mighty company, but just as Microsoft just doesn't seem able to get itself any reasonable market-share in the search engine business, I really don't see Google doing any better the other way around. Even Apple who has been trying basically for longer than Microsoft exists and certainly for longer than Windows exists has only managed to capture a relatively very small piece of the OS pie. Depending on who you ask, Windows still has a market share on the desktop between 90 and 95%. Still, any extra 'help' to fight this insane monopoly is welcome of course.
  8. The one way I can see them having a big impact is if they completely embrace mobility... the initial thrust into netbooks seems to say they're on that path. Most people, me included, believe that as the world evolves we'll have more mobile devices like cell phones (more advanced one would hope) and we'll be more comfortable with our data living "in the cloud". I just think that's the natural evolution, and Google is pretty much at the forefront of that drive. This new OS of theirs, assuming it's engineered well enough to run on numerous devices, can get a big leg-up over the competition in that area. I think Palm has the right idea, and now too does Google it seems... what's maybe more interesting here is how MS responds.
  9. What isn't so obvious is that the apps running on gOS will likely perform as well as native windows application. There were various demo's of 3D real-time scenes at the recent google io conference showing that counter-intuitively, there doesn't have to be much of a performance hit running in a browser. The challenge Google have is to advance the HTML 5 standards to include enhancements (like the mess with video at present) that support their goal of high performance browser application without having to rely on plugins. Obviously people like Microsoft and Adobe with flash will do everything they can to keep the browser standards locked into the last century in order to restrict google's room for movement. J.
  10. If you've done work with the canvas tag as I have, you realize pretty quickly that with modern hardware underneath it, you can get some pretty amazing results. I would imagine that's what you saw in the demos (I'd be surprised otherwise). I'd be willing to bet when you start up a gOS-based netbook you'll be greeted with something along the lines of the Xbox 360 dashboard, really a glorified app launcher. It's just another app running on the platform though, but with a full-screen canvas you could do some pretty amazing things and make it look like a real OS in the process. That's just a guess on my part, but I think it'll wind up being along those lines, and I think that could wind up being really impressive, both visually and functionally.
  11. Since Google added support for the complaint of Opera vs Microsoft about bundling IE with Windows, I'm really looking forward to see witch browsers will be bundled with Chrome OS. How about running IE8 on Chrome OS 1.0! ;-)
  12. Um, but IE is a part of the Windows OS; Bill Gates swore to it in court. Oh, except in Europe, I guess.
  13. Hmmm.... new OS? "Google Chrome running within a new windowing system on top of a Linux kernel". This is not a new OS anymore than Chrome was a new core browser. Chrome took HtmlKit and but a different set of extentions and look/feel on it. This is taking Linux and putting a new stripped down windowing system on top of it. But great marketing.
  14. Hmmm.... new OS? "Google Chrome running within a new windowing system on top of a Linux kernel".

    This is not a new OS anymore than Chrome was a new core browser. Chrome took HtmlKit and but a different set of extentions and look/feel on it. This is taking Linux and putting a new stripped down windowing system on top of it. But great marketing.
    From a technology perspective yes. But, I'd have been more surprised if they did not build on *nux. Why recreate the entire kernel anyway? Before this year's GoogleIO, I'd have been surprised that it is not a flavor of Android. But seeing google push android as an OS for the computationally challenged (lower processing power) at Google IO, I'm not too surprised that ChromeOS will have some overlap. Although, not too happy about it either ;-)
  15. its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    With so many companies prividing software as a service, you dont really need a big fat machine to do heavy weight crunching. Add the whole "cloud computing" to this mix and you realize that you only need a thin client(like browser) and a fast connection to internet. And you can have your os, applications, docs whatever else you need on the web. What do you need the big hard disk and the big OS for ? i think thats the direction this whole "lightweight, simple, secure" OS from google is going !!!! i could be wrong
  16. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    I guess what google have realised is that,to quote Sun, the network is the computer. And all they need to do is slap a simple front end on it. Microsoft still believe the computer is the computer, and so their natural inclination is to lock users to it. Once you realise that the network is the computer, its not such a giant step to see open standards and open protocols as the basic glue. The glue that enables reusable services and components to make up a more flexible definition of what constitutes an application.
  17. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    I guess what google have realised is that,to quote Sun, the network is the computer. And all they need to do is slap a simple front end on it.

    Microsoft still believe the computer is the computer, and so their natural inclination is to lock users to it.

    Once you realise that the network is the computer, its not such a giant step to see open standards and open protocols as the basic glue. The glue that enables reusable services and components to make up a more flexible definition of what constitutes an application.
    So what's wrong with having both the network *and* the computer? I smell another Network Computer flop. Look, a decent netbook with a full-blown OS has the capability to run a browser to access "the cloud", *and* run native applications. Why should I have to choose one or the other? What good does a web-based OS do me when I'm in the subway, or on an airplane, and out of contact with "the cloud"? This is one of the many reasons why Windows-based netbooks outsell Linux-based networks by over 10-to-1. Mark
  18. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    What good does a web-based OS do me when I'm in the subway, or on an airplane, and out of contact with "the cloud"?
    It continues working offline via, say, Google Gears and automatically syncs up once the network becomes available again...
  19. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    ... What good does a web-based OS do me when I'm in the subway, or on an airplane, and out of contact with "the cloud"?

    This is one of the many reasons why Windows-based netbooks outsell Linux-based networks by over 10-to-1.

    Mark
    Huh? So Linux is web-based? I think the "windows lemming factor" is the reason for your 10-to-1 ratio.
  20. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    Once you realise that the network is the computer, its not such a giant step to see open standards and open protocols as the basic glue. The glue that enables reusable services and components to make up a more flexible definition of what constitutes an application.
    Larry Ellison and Scott McNealy been there and done that in the mid 90s and it was just failure. People want bits on their own systems.
  21. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    That *was* true in the 90's... Google is betting that the game has changed and people will be more accepting of "life in the cloud". I for one think they *may* be right, at this point in time (or very soon thereafter). People are already becoming more accepting of the concept. Witness the rise of webmail, online office apps, Flickr, online storage facilities, even Facebook. People are becoming much more comfortable with the idea of their data residing "out there". It's not fully accepted yet to be sure, but I think we're getting there, and pretty rapidly. We may be right in the midst of the tide changing! Maybe Larry and Scott were 100% right, just 10-15 years too soon :) I think that's exactly Googles' bet, now we'll just have to see if it pays off or not.
  22. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    The geek side of me says "cool, with Google's resources let's see them do something different and innovative with Linux userland" - instead of Yet Another Distro. The practical side of me knows that handy-wavy "cloud, network computing" is an uphill battle. I would expect them to have better luck in the mobile (real mobile) space.
  23. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    That *was* true in the 90's... Google is betting that the game has changed and people will be more accepting of "life in the cloud". I for one think they *may* be right, at this point in time (or very soon thereafter).

    People are already becoming more accepting of the concept. Witness the rise of webmail, online office apps, Flickr, online storage facilities, even Facebook. People are becoming much more comfortable with the idea of their data residing "out there". It's not fully accepted yet to be sure, but I think we're getting there, and pretty rapidly. We may be right in the midst of the tide changing!

    Maybe Larry and Scott were 100% right, just 10-15 years too soon :) I think that's exactly Googles' bet, now we'll just have to see if it pays off or not.
    I still don't by it. I can have my data in the cloud *and* still have a full-blown OS to run my native applications. Why compromise when I can have both? That's not to say that Microsoft can sit on their butts and do nothing. Reports regarding Windows 7 have been fairly positive.
  24. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    I still don't by it. I can have my data in the cloud *and* still have a full-blown OS to run my native applications. Why compromise when I can have both?

    That's not to say that Microsoft can sit on their butts and do nothing. Reports regarding Windows 7 have been fairly positive.
    I also do not want either. There are several scenarios that you lose if you just go with online and cloud. If the service provider goes out of business, service is down for whatever reason and you have a very emergency thing to do, like in my Asia-Pacific country (where all connections are ADSL but still not that stable and when a fiber link dies everyone suffers) if links internet is slow or down you are down, you are too mobile and not everywhere is covered with the internet, you run heavy applications (either process or data transfer heavy) .... Should I count more. Even one of these cases will prevent me of putting a full fledged OS like windows or linux away for perhaps another 10-20 years.
  25. Re: its about the future >>[ Go to top ]

    People are becoming much more comfortable with the idea of their data residing "out there". It's not fully accepted yet to be sure, but I think we're getting there, and pretty rapidly. We may be right in the midst of the tide changing!
    Problem is, data's getting bigger. Who's going to upload several GB of data so they can use an on-line video editor? One of the biggest complaints I hear from non-techie computer users (Hi Mom!) is how long it takes the computer to "do something" where "something" in invariably defined as either launch a program or load some data. Heck, I chafe whenever I have to use a laptop with a 5400RPM drive, I can't imagine what loading data from "the cloud" with a 1Mb ADSL connection would be like. Probably a lot like surfing YouTube, and you know how productive that is... ;)
  26. So true[ Go to top ]

    I have to agree on this one 100%
  27. So true[ Go to top ]

    Once you realise that the network is the computer, its not such a giant step to see open standards and open protocols as the basic glue. The glue that enables reusable services and components to make up a more flexible definition of what constitutes an application.


    Larry Ellison and Scott McNealy been there and done that in the mid 90s and it was just failure. People want bits on their own systems.
    I have to agree on this one 100%.
  28. citizens of computing freaks republic, i dont think u realize what is happening here. finally some IT industry giant makes a move to free home user mass from MS slavery. ubuntu? convince your blonde secretary to use ubuntu. she barely manage to use windows crappolla which we have to admit has the advantage of being pretty accessible even for blondes and mentals. if google will keep this chrome os stupid simple but very stable and realiable we will not hear about MS ever. even tho i would build this chrome os on top of freebsd im happy that finally some giant is willing to offer a seriosu alternative to MS crap. btw: google chrome is a superb piece of browser even tho is still young. which heavy balls browser on this planet has each tab on a separate thread? "Save and restore session" of firefox simply puts me in the LMAO status.
  29. citizens of computing freaks republic, i dont think u realize what is happening here. finally some IT industry giant makes a move to free home user mass from MS slavery.
    +1
    ubuntu? convince your blonde secretary to use ubuntu. she barely manage to use windows ....
    +1
    btw: google chrome is a superb piece of browser even tho is still young.
    One thing that frustrates me: No warning when I close browser with multiple tabs. I remember Google said it's a design philosophy and are trying to figure out a better way. Until they do, I will use FF
  30. ...she barely manage to use windows crappolla which we have to admit has the advantage of being pretty accessible even for blondes and mentals....
    even this can be questioned nowadays. Ubuntu *is* very accessible IMO.
  31. citizens of computing freaks republic, i dont think u realize what is happening here. finally some IT industry giant makes a move to free home user mass from MS slavery
    Slavery? -10 for stupid hyberole
    ubuntu? convince your blonde secretary to use ubuntu. she barely manage to use windows crappolla which we have to admit has the advantage of being pretty accessible even for blondes and mentals.
    Incoherent "engrish"

    if google will keep this chrome os stupid simple but very stable and realiable we will not hear about MS ever.
    Ahh..the old "If I just wish MS away..."

    even tho i would build this chrome os on top of freebsd im happy that finally some giant is willing to offer a seriosu alternative to MS crap.
    BSD would make more sense if they wanted to close source it, but they can close source userland anyway, and Linux has more drivers.
  32. This is a very interesting development as many have already stated, but I was wondering what this means for application developers. If I am planning to develop an application for Chrome OS would this require the application to run in "the cloud" or would it run locally on the computer? Also what about Java applications? how would a JVM run on this new OS? I am not sure if I am jumping the gun here, but I am curious as to how this works.
  33. Bits on their computer?[ Go to top ]

    Come on, what are you smoking? Most people don't even know what bits are or where they would be on their computer. Most people. Most people just want an email app that works, a Web browser that works for Ebay, somewhere to store their photos, etc. Most people don't even know how to use folders to store their files, in fact they don't even store their files, they just get lost somewhere. We're not talking about technies here, or specialist workers, or you and me, we're talking about most people. Cheers, Ashley.
  34. Google Will Fail !!![ Go to top ]

    An interesting idea put forth by Google - i.e. Pushing mass client software content through the browser connected to the web. However, I would have been more interested in seeing Google deliver a strategy which would see their new Chrome OS running all applications that run on Windows including P.C. games, and the myriad of other commercial P.C software out there including those provided by Microsoft. So instead of the tag line reading, "The web is the OS," it should instead read, "If it runs on windows, we run it better on Chrome OS." I think it's foolish for Google to be putting all its eggs in one basket, thinking that software that runs natively, on the O.S., and outside the browser is going to be phased out soon, and everybody will run their client apps in a browser. If Google continues down this path, Microsoft has nothing to fear from them, as I'm not giving up Windows anytime soon as long I play Warcraft III and Starcraft II to come. In other words, Google should be using their clout to get commercial desktop software vendors to build their applications to run on Chrome either through partnerships, or some enhanced virtualization layer in their Chrome OS that's capable of running all Windows based software properly with little or no loss in performance, if not better than they run on Windows.
  35. Re: Google Will Fail !!![ Go to top ]

    I think its curious how people don't 'get' whats going on. Desktops/PCs are yesterday's news. Sure there are plenty of people who can't see the wood for the trees and will try to cling on as long as possible, and trot out all sorts of reasons for the long term dominance of the desktop, but they all face one big problem... reality. Like it or not you live in a connected world where connectivity will be ubiquitous and as reliable as electricity. Where computing power shrinks to the size of a mobile device that you can secret about your person, that you interface with via voice, vision, touch or text. Sure you can still have a desktop to run you're old PC games. But most people will be happy enough with new applications that arrive to satisfy that need. This isn't about competing with Windows. Its about the evolution of computers to the next phase.
  36. Re: Google Will Fail !!![ Go to top ]

    What you can't do is try to build a better Windows than Windows. Its like trying to build a better BMW than BMW. BMW will always make the best BMWs. What you can do though is create a new type of transportation that floats on a bed of air, thus rendering rubber wheeled BMWs obsolete.
  37. Of course Google will fail[ Go to top ]

    Let me guess the whole crap will be based on HTML5. Microsoft and Apple are laughing at Google. Google needs to stick to what it can do - search. It'll just fail at everything else.
  38. Cooool[ Go to top ]

    Now this I'd like to see. I've been a huge fan of Chrome since day one. The performance is second to none, and it's very intuitive. Granted, the bugs need to be worked out as it crashes a few times a day, but it's beta. I'll keep an eye on this one. It's annoying to have to learn the nuances of every new hand held device that hits the market.