Slingshot Yourself into JSF 2.0 Development using Tomcat 7 & the JDK

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News: Slingshot Yourself into JSF 2.0 Development using Tomcat 7 & the JDK


  1. It's about time that the enterprise Java community started to embrace JavaServer Faces. And in an effort to promote a general acceptance and understanding of the technology, the editor of TheServerSide, in association with JSF and WebSphere Portal expert Sal Pece, are going to be publishing and promoting a few of the more interesting chapters of their upcoming book JSF Made Easy.

    To start with, the tutorials will be discussing the very basics of how to get started with JSF 2.0. Yes, it's a boring old "Hello World" application done with xhtml pages and the like. But it's unique in the fact that there is no IDE used - all of the examples are developed using nothing more than the JDK and a Tomcat 7 installation, and that goes for every tutorial in the set, right up to the examples that use Spring and Hibernate. These very egalitarian tutorials are IDE agnostic, helping you learn JSF regardless of what your preferred development environment is.

    Anyways, here's the first wave. The following link is your standard, text based, image laden tutorial that discusses the basics:

    Getting Started with JavaServer Faces 2.0: Setup, Configuration and Deployment to Tomcat

    The second link is exactly the same as the first, except that it's different. The second tutorial is a screencapture video of the first tutorial, so if you're too lazy to read, you can just sit back, watch, learn and listen.

    Video Tutorial on Developing a Basic Application with JSF 2.0 and Tomcat 7

    And there will be plenty more to come over the next month.

    Catch Cameron McKenzie & Max Katz at TSSJS 2011 in Las Vegas (March 16th-18th)

    Oh, and by the way, Cameron McKenzie will be presenting a session at TheServerSide Java Symposium on what's new and exciting with JPA 2.0. He'll also be loitering around the various sessions being delivered by Max Katz, author of Practical RichFaces, as Mr. Katz discusses what's new with RichFaces 4.0.

    If you register before February 11th (tomorrow as of writing this), you'll be eligible for the $100 Early-Bird discount, so don't delay and sign up today.

    Register for TheServerSide Java Symposium 2011

    Threaded Messages (4)

  2. So why haven't you jumped into it?[ Go to top ]

    Because, GWT is much better and matured and I can build far more scalable apps using it than JSF - without maintaining state on the server side.

    It is lot more fun as well.

  3. And, because[ Go to top ]

    I hate the JSF life cycle. It reminds you of the old web.  Also, JSF really is not a standard as Rich faces, Ice faces, prime faces all have different implementations to provide second class AJAX and components.

    GWT is Ajaxed from ground up and you program it using much simpler concepts.

  4. And, because[ Go to top ]

     It's clear from this comment that your knowledge of JSF isn't current.

    I really don't get the motivation that makes some people chime in with "this technology sucks" commentary every time someone says certain terms.

  5. And, because[ Go to top ]

    I hate the JSF life cycle. It reminds you of the old web.  Also, JSF really is not a standard as Rich faces, Ice faces, prime faces all have different implementations to provide second class AJAX and components.

    GWT is Ajaxed from ground up and you program it using much simpler concepts.

     

    If you consider JSF2.x, your sentence is no more true. New JSF specification (and implementation) provides an AJAX abstraction layer which can be used by component vendors.