A Guide for Eclipse users to get started quicker with IntelliJ IDEA

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News: A Guide for Eclipse users to get started quicker with IntelliJ IDEA

  1. In Getting Started with IntelliJ IDEA as an Eclipse User, readers receive a quick-start guide for IntelliJ, written from the specific perspective of someone used to Eclipse.

    In the Java world, IntelliJ IDEA is the only commercial IDE that commands any considerable share of the marketing--nearly 30% of developers use IntelliJ for at least some projects. While the open-source Eclipse IDE is still the market place with around 2/3 of devs using it, we've noticed that IntelliJ users (as well as some NetBeans fans too) are especially dedicated to their IDE of choice. We wanted to know why.

    So Anton Arhipov, JRebel product lead and multi-IDE user himself, decided to look into it. Inside, he covers:

    • Chapter I – Project structure and configuration, including folders, facets, and the terminology gap between IDEA and Eclipse regarding Modules and Projects.
    • Chapter II – This was the big boy of the report, covering keymap and key bindings, loads of navigation and editor settings, compilation, and a whole list of awesome shortcuts in a printable cheat sheet.
    • Chapter III – This is where we get truly practical with running tests and deploying your app to your application server, along with artifact definition.

    We also asked Andrey Cheptsov and Hadi Hariri from JetBrains to help us out as well, and came up with a solid report of tips and tricks, including a printable, two-page cheat sheet of shortcuts. All in all, it's a great way for Eclipse users to check out what all the fuss is about over IntelliJ--and whether it's really worth it! 

    Read the HTML and download the PDF here: http://zeroturnaround.com/rebellabs/getting-started-with-intellij-idea-as-an-eclipse-user/

  2. Great news for all Eclipse users wanting to migrate away: you don't even have to pay. Eclipse is the only one being so bad (like not supporting the top-used java build tools natively). IntelliJ, Netbeans and even JDeveloper are great IDEs. The latter two being free for a comparable set of features.

  3. Great news for all Eclipse users wanting to migrate away: you don't even have to pay. Eclipse is the only one being so bad (like not supporting the top-used java build tools natively). IntelliJ, Netbeans and even JDeveloper are great IDEs. The latter two being free for a comparable set of features.

     

    NOT.  ALL Eclipse users will NOT be satisfied by the Community Edition of Intellij.  Eclipse users in the enterprise space will give up alot, including hot deploy and remote app server debugging, and will have to be willing to give up on web and jee assists.

     

    NOT exactly 'news' either.  IntelliJ has been offering Community Edition for several years now, IIRC.

     

    I'm responding to the verifiable information of your post.  I am not commenting here on the relative quality of Eclipse vs IntelliJ.

  4. I started using IntelliJ Idea as an Android Studio, and now occasionally trying it on java projects as well.

    One thing I'm missing every time is an instant feedback from unit tests. With Eclipse in less than a second I can save a class, re-run the last test and get results.

    Could not get the same level of responsiveness from Idea - it is a few seconds usually.

  5. Check out the infinitest plugin for intellij http://plugins.jetbrains.com/plugin/3146?pr=idea, that might help you!