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News: Jahia CMS and Portal Server 4.0 Released

  1. Jahia CMS and Portal Server 4.0 Released (9 messages)

    The Jahia community is proud to announce the release 4.0 of the Jahia Content Management and Corporate Portal Server. Jahia also includes a full search engine, a lightweight document management system (WebDAV support) and a range of collaborative and productivity based web applications (Portlets such as a discussion forum, a WebMail, a ToDo List, a Timesheet...).

    From a technical perspective, Jahia aims to integrate best of the Apache and other open source Java libraries into one easy to install, coherent and homogenous application platform suite. Thus Java developers will benefit from well-known libraries, better documentation and a strong community while end-user and system integrators will immediately benefit of a ready to use pre-integrated platform.

    The Jahia software is 100% Java based and is released under a collaborative source license (contribute or pay paradigm). The full source code, binary versions and some easy to install demo editions are freely available for download on the product community web site: http://www.jahia.org. A demo web site and some guided tours may also be directly experienced online.

    Jahia 4.0 features:
    - Pre-integrated CMS and Portal Servers
    - Full Multilanguage and Internationalization support
    - Content Staging and Workflow capabilities
    - Content Versioning and Locking
    - Document Management with WebDAV support (Apache Slide)
    - Full support of JSTL or Struts taglibs to ease template development
    - Native support of standard Java servlets or Struts servlets as portlets
    - JTidy integration to automatically parse and correct bad HTML code
    - Load balancing support
    And a lot more other nice new features. Please check the Readme file to get more information.

    Threaded Messages (9)

  2. Can anyone compare how does it stack up against WL Portal (from WLP 8)?
    I liked your quick tour.

    Thanks,
    Michael
  3. Is it JSR 168 compliant?[ Go to top ]

    Checked its website, but didn't see anything claiming it is 168-compliant.
  4. Is it JSR 168 compliant?[ Go to top ]

    Jahia currently supports standard servlets as portlets without any code modifications. The prepackaged webapps for example are standard servlets than can run smoothly in standalone mode without Jahia.

    Jahia will integrate Pluto and Jetspeed 2 as soon as possible during the next months (e.g. Jahia 4.1) as our strategy aims to package most of the Apache Java libraries into one homogenous easy to install and easy to use framework.

    Stéphane
  5. Is it JSR 168 compliant?[ Go to top ]

    Jahia currently supports standard servlets as portlets without any code modifications. The prepackaged webapps for example are standard servlets than can run smoothly in standalone mode without Jahia.

    >
    > Jahia will integrate Pluto and Jetspeed 2 as soon as possible during the next months (e.g. Jahia 4.1) as our strategy aims to package most of the Apache Java libraries into one homogenous easy to install and easy to use framework.
    >
    > Stéphane

    So... Is it JSR 168 compliant?
  6. Is it JSR 168 compliant?[ Go to top ]

    I guess it is not JSR 168 compliant now.
    Can anyone help me to delete my previous post? Thank you.
  7. have a look at it[ Go to top ]

    You may not know this but the Jahia team helped write JSR 168.

    It is a very elegant implementation of a portal. Weblogic 7 cannot compare and weblogic 8 is a pollutant for struts.

    Does anyone at BEA understand their products internally?
  8. Pricing[ Go to top ]

    30 000 Euro for a unlimited license isn't really cheap.
  9. Pricing[ Go to top ]

    Don't forget that you can pay your license fee in whole or in part through some contributions in kind. Moreover the base price starts at 4'990 Euro/USD per server (not per CPU) and 30K is the MAX price you may pay for your physical server. So if you compare with other similar products (mid range CMS or Portal Server such as Reddot, Paperthin, M$ CMS Server + Sharepoint...) Jahia is very affordable. I do not include the fact that you have one Portal + one full CMS pre-integrated in one single package... So definitively not as free as pure open source libraries but, hey!, a viral effect on contributions is not so bad after all. This pushes users to become contributors as you have to do it to reduce your license fee and insures that the comminity of developers around the platform is growing faster.
  10. Pricing[ Go to top ]

    This pushes users to become contributors as you have to do it to reduce your license fee and insures that the comminity of developers around the platform is growing faster.

    Just curious, how many developers have "earned their freedom" to date through contributions? From what I read on your site this sounds a bit unfair as the developer's quote to the Jahia community could easily be rejected or reduced in value.

    Also, when you charge $5 per passive user (which I assume is a visitor to the portal and not a user maintaining it), is it even possible to fully pay for your Jahia license through contributions? If you are running a successful portal and your site traffic increases significantly, will you have to continue contributing to the project just to keep your site alive?

    I am open to the idea of a collaborative source project and would probably like to participate but I have my doubts about the practicality of your licensing scheme. Can you give us an idea of the typical monetary value given to community contributed features? On average, how many contributions would it take to obtain a server license for Jahia?