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General J2EE: Do we need J2EE for this?

  1. Do we need J2EE for this? (5 messages)

    We want to write a ERP-Software for our company.

    The number of users will be up to 200 (mostly not at the same time).

    Since usability is important, we plan to choose a Swing GUI.

    What do you think of it? Do we need J2EE for that? Or is this a bit too much?

    If you need more information to answer that question, please ask me.

    Threaded Messages (5)

  2. Do we need J2EE for this?[ Go to top ]

    Of course you do not need J2EE. If your company has an email system and Microsoft Office, you could email spreadsheets back and forth.
  3. When you your use J2EE[ Go to top ]

    Here. Mr. "Race Condition", is just making a joke as you can see.


    Yes!. You should use J2EE. Try reading J2EE/Design Patterns first and look at others solution architecture that could fit your problem.

    Take a look to other ERP Systems like Compiere http://www.compiere.org... or maybe you want something like: www.OBiz.org
  4. When you your use J2EE[ Go to top ]

    But our requirements are really simple. Just a client-server thing. So I try to avoid using complicated J2EE for this. Development is so unproductive with J2EE and so dangerous of project failure.

    I wished to read why J2EE is necessary at all for our requirements and not just yes or no.
  5. Do we need J2EE for this?[ Go to top ]

    Few things to consider before using J2EE:

    a. Having 200 users (which I believe will tend to increase over time), J2EE is a
       good choice so you can take advantage of technologies such as caching,
       pooling, asynch messaging, clustering etc. Having a J2EE server would make
       your system more responsive and minimize downtime.

    b. It is not correct to assume that the 200 users will not use the system at the
       same time. Even if they will never use it at the same time, assume the worst.
       Even 20 users can be a burden if these people tend to process huge
       transactions, include the volume of transactions in your planning.

    c. I assume that the ERP system will be the "backbone" of the company.
       Scalability is a factor. You may want an application that can "expand" and
       "adapt" quickly according to company's future needs. J2EE applications, if
       designed properly, will not have a problem if a change is implemented.

    d. However, do not use J2EE if you have a low budget margin (J2EE projects tend
       to be expensive with personnel compensation) or you cannot find a J2EE
       developer competent enough. J2EE often fails because the developer lacks the
       skills required or the knowledge in implementing design patterns.

    If budget is not a problem, you can also take a look on ERP Systems (SAP for example).
  6. Do we need J2EE for this?[ Go to top ]

    a. Having 200 users (which I believe will tend to increase over time), J2EE is a good choice so you can take advantage of technologies such as caching, pooling, asynch messaging, clustering etc. Having a J2EE server would make your system more responsive and minimize downtime.
    But if a ORM like Hibernate is used, it can do the caching and pooling or am I wrong? This leaves just messaging and clustering. I think JMS can be used without a J2EE environment or not? And by the time we need clustering there should be a aspect available for it I hope...