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News: Vendor Perspective: Mainsoft on running IL in a Java container

  1. In the past we have done hard core tech talks which have been product and vendor agnostic. We have had a lot of interest in getting more talks which DO go into some details on products. This is why we have started a new type of tech talk, named Vendor Perspective.

    This first one is an interview with a customer of Mainsoft, in which we talk about a project where a half-million line C# app was run on Tomcat and Linux.

    Mainsoft provides Visual Mainwin, which allows Microsoft IL to run in a Java container. It’s kind of interesting technology from a computer science perspective, and it may solve a certain class of business problem.

    TheServerSide.com got an exclusive interview with Noam Fogel, VP of Research and Development for Infogate Online. “Essentially, we had 3 years of development investment in our Microsoft software. We were faced with a competitive bid for a Telco project, which required the software to run on Unix and Java. We had 90 days to make it work. I don’t know of any other solution that would have made this possible.” Noam estimated that to port the software by hand would take a team of 3 or 4 developers about 18 months to complete such a project. Mainsoft provided professional services as well as technology to this effort.

    In this interview, we explore some of the issues of using Visual Mainwin to migrate .NET to Java, such as how the project went, performance and maintainability, what types of issues arose in the conversion, etc.

    Read more at Vendor Perspective: Half Million Lines of C# Running on J2EE.

    Note: This new type of content on TSS is in no way sponsored. Feel free to suggest your own ideas for vendor perspectives.

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. Wrong community?[ Go to top ]

    Shouldn't this article just be on TheServerSide.NET? The app was written in C#, not Java. Even if it runs on a Java VM, it's a C# app. To quote from the article:

    "It’s kind of interesting technology from a computer science perspective, and it may solve a certain class of business problem. For Java zealots, this is not satisfying..."

    Emphasis on "kind of" and "not satisfying". I guess I'm a zealot? That's about where I quit reading, too.
  3. Wrong community?[ Go to top ]

    Maybe you should have finished reading the entire sentence: "For Java zealots, this is not satisfying, as it does not convert any .NET programmers to Java programmers."

    He's defining a "Java zealot" as someone whose interest would be limited to converting .NET programmers to Java programmers, and not with the .NET/Java interoperability provided by this product. Only you can decide whether you agree with this definition of a "Java zealot", and whether you are one by this or any other definition.
  4. Wrong community?[ Go to top ]

    From a tech perspective, kewl as **** (but don't tell Rolf or I'll lose my zealot card .. ;-)

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Shared Memories for J2EE Clusters
  5. I love our field[ Go to top ]

    So in theory we could:

    1. Develop in Java and run on JVM on any OS
    2. Develop in .NET and run on CLR on windows
    3. Develop in .NET and run on Mono on linux
    4. Develop in Java and run on CLR using IKVM
    5. Develop in .NET and run on JVM using Visual MainWin

    And then, we get to choose methodologies, frameworks, appservers, IDEs, tools etc etc

    ;-)
  6. I love our field[ Go to top ]

    So in theory we could:1. Develop in Java and run on JVM on any OS2. Develop in .NET and run on CLR on windows3. Develop in .NET and run on Mono on linux4. Develop in Java and run on CLR using IKVM5. Develop in .NET and run on JVM using Visual MainWinAnd then, we get to choose methodologies, frameworks, appservers, IDEs, tools etc etc;-)
    Heh, you forgot

    6. Develop with gcj and run natively on any OS :)

    cheers,
    dalibor topic
  7. Fascinating, and relevant...[ Go to top ]

    ... to both theserverside.com and theserverside.net IMHO, so thanks for posting it here, as I don't check out theserverside.net often.
  8. No mention of EJBs[ Go to top ]

    Since there was no mentioning of EJBs and Tomcat was specially mentioned, it looks like this was a web-app J2EE application. Perhaps I missed it in TFA and since databases are mentioned I suppose they just used JDBC or some other persistence implementation (hiberate, JDO, etc.) for db access.
  9. No mention of EJBs[ Go to top ]

    I've been working with Visual MainWin for J2EE on a few projects which had .NET front ends and EJB based busisness backends. Visual MainWin will generate all the RMI code, and you can refence the EJB from within C# as a C# object. This is a much cleaner solution for us than using .NET - J2EE brigding. We have deployed on both Weblogic and WebSphere. The Mainsoft website has a version of the .NET Petshop that uses the Java Petstore EJBs.
    Web Service clients are generated in a similar way.