Discussions

News: Sun's stars: Where are they now? And why did they leave?

  1. Paul Krill looks at Oracle after the Java acquisition, and wonders where all of the talented Java people have gone.

    "The key forces behind Java, JRuby, and more have all left Oracle."

    Searching for Sun's Stars

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. Isn't it good to change jobs?[ Go to top ]

    I don't know about others, but it's good to change jobs. People leaving sun after the oracle acquisition is a good thing. It lets good people do different things and gain different experiences. It's everyone's interest to see talented individuals move around and do different things.

  3. Isn't it good to change jobs?[ Go to top ]

    I don't know about others, but it's good to change jobs. People leaving sun after the oracle acquisition is a good thing. It lets good people do different things and gain different experiences. It's everyone's interest to see talented individuals move around and do different things.

     

    From the perspective of the individual I would agree. However, from the perspective of the various communities and projects, the uncertainty introduced by the flight of the respective brain trusts is a little unnerving. Do these individuals know something we don't. Which of these projects are "dead men walking" and are going to be terminated or severely diminished in scope and/or priority.

    It's not just me either. My clients, who are just starting to dip their toes back into capital spending waters, are afraid to make decisions in the java space because of the uncertainty. .NET has a perceived level of security viz a viz java right now. I hope Oracle defends or at least clarifies what technologies are on their A-list.

  4. Isn't it good to change jobs?[ Go to top ]

    My feeling in those situations is those business people didn't like Java to begin with and use the acquisition as an excuse. Oracle isn't going any where in the near future and it's clear java is a key component of their business. I've been on projects that started out as potential "java project", but quickly became .NET projects because the business people were more comfortable with .NET.

    I still take the position it's good for people to change jobs because it gives other developers a chance to step up and grow. Of course, if the company doesn't have any junior talent to fill the void, then they have issues. Ultimately, everything dies. That includes both Java and .NET. As Lao Tzu would say "the only constant is change".

  5. Isn't it good to change jobs?[ Go to top ]

    @Peter

    Why is tss.net quite barren ?

    The only big gorilla in the Dotnet world is microsoft, nobody else really participates, just listen to dot net rocks, they only talk about ms technologies. The remainder of the big gorillas (Oracle, IBM, Google etc) play with java in some for or other.

    Another interesting barometer is that of how many dotnet oss projects get cloned into a java equivalent. It seems me that the balance in this regard is quite the opposite with dot net community gaining inspiration from java.

  6. Isn't it good to change jobs?[ Go to top ]

    @Peter

    Why is tss.net quite barren ?

    The only big gorilla in the Dotnet world is microsoft, nobody else really participates, just listen to dot net rocks, they only talk about ms technologies. The remainder of the big gorillas (Oracle, IBM, Google etc) play with java in some for or other.

    Another interesting barometer is that of how many dotnet oss projects get cloned into a java equivalent. It seems me that the balance in this regard is quite the opposite with dot net community gaining inspiration from java.

    I didn't mean to say Java was deficient, just that managers tend to choose what they are comfortable with. I use both and find strengths and weaknesses in both. There are quite a few java OSS projects ported to .NET. I've used quite a few of them.

  7. Isn't it good to change jobs?[ Go to top ]

    I don't know about others, but it's good to change jobs. People leaving sun after the oracle acquisition is a good thing. It lets good people do different things and gain different experiences. It's everyone's interest to see talented individuals move around and do different things.

     

    From the perspective of the individual I would agree. However, from the perspective of the various communities and projects, the uncertainty introduced by the flight of the respective brain trusts is a little unnerving. Do these individuals know something we don't. Which of these projects are "dead men walking" and are going to be terminated or severely diminished in scope and/or priority.

    It's not just me either. My clients, who are just starting to dip their toes back into capital spending waters, are afraid to make decisions in the java space because of the uncertainty. .NET has a perceived level of security viz a viz java right now. I hope Oracle defends or at least clarifies what technologies are on their A-list.

    This questions the basic idea of java's community based approach for developing solutions. If we are dependent on individuals then this concept does not work. We have to believe that there will be equally good if not better people who step in to fill these shoes.
  8. its here to stay[ Go to top ]

    With the big shots such as IBM, Google (thru Android) betting on it, you can assure your Clients that Java is here to stay

     

  9. Alas, Tim[ Go to top ]

    Seeing the true management layer change hands is nothing to be of concern. There are better managers in the world to help shepherd the Java platform.

    My concern is a brain drain. Tim Bray is a individual that knows what the Java platform needs to be competitive against PHP, Zend, .NET, and Ruby. He uniquely bridged the gap between the technologists and executive management at Sun.

    Simon Phipps is the conscience of a large organization. He knows how the distribution license of the Java platform impacts organizations adoption.

    Oracle needs to step up with its own people who can understand what the Java platform needs and how to translate that to budgets and communication to the developer community. I wish I knew the identity of these people at Oracle. Anyone know?

    -Frank Cohen

    http://www.pushtotest.com